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About the project
The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London lying inside the M25.

There are now over 16 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, you can use the map control by clicking on markers to change location or choose different historical views.

If you wish to contribute to the project, you can use a Facebook login to authorise The Underground Map app and tell other users the story of your area, street or house.
N.B. The app is simply used to authorise users and will not post to Facebook.

You can search any of the locations that have been created so far by searching for the title. Type into the box below:
 
There are a series of historical maps covering each decade between 1800 and 1950.
Navigate to the area that you wish to view using the dropdown. Choose a location and then click Reset Location
Search for a street in London by typing its name into the box below:
Users have created a series of historical location articles to go with the historic maps.
Click icons on the mapping to display each article. Subjects are many and various - simply explore!
Explore old maps of London
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1750s
‘A plan of the cities of London and Westminster, and borough of Southwark’, surveyed by John Rocque and engraved by John Pine in 1746.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1800s
Richard Horwood’s ‘PLAN of the Cities of LONDON and WESTMINSTER the Borough of SOUTHWARK, and PARTS adjoining Shewing every HOUSE’ was produced between 1792 and 1799.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1830s
Greenwood's map of London, 1827, surveyed over the previous two years.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1860s
Edward Stanford's Library Map of London and its Suburbs, 1862.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1900s
Ordnance Survey Map of London, Five feet to the Mile, 1893-1896.
View the map.

Featured articles

SEPTEMBER
24
2017

 

Porlock Street, W10
Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether. Porlock Street is now simply a stump of a street, a cul-de-sac without its own name. Before the 1960s it ran up to Barlby Road from Treverton Street.

Formerly Bran(d)sford Street, it had become Portlock Street in 1917. After the Second World War, it became Porlock Road for a while.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2017

 

West Acton
West Acton is a London Underground station between Ealing Broadway and North Acton on the Ealing Broadway branch of the Central line, and is its only intermediate station. On 18 August 1911, the Central London Railway abandoned its policy of no through running with any other railway, and secured powers to build a short extension from Wood Lane to connect with the intended Ealing & Shepherds Bush line of the Great Western Railway, over which it proposed to exercise running powers.

The station is a Grade II listed building and is close to North Ealing tube station on the Piccadilly line, situated 550 metres at the western end of Queens Drive.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
17
2017

 

Forty Farm
Forty Farm was situated where the Sudbury to Kingsbury road crossed the Lidding at Forty Bridge. In the 14th or 15th centuries, people, including the Uxendon family from Uxendon Farm, moved south to form another small community at Forty Green.

This settlement was known as Uxendon Forty, Wembley Forty or Preston Forty. The farm at Forty Green was at first called Pargrave's, and later South Forty Farm.

Even as late as the 19th century, the area had not changed significantly. London's growing need for hay meant that Forty Farm had converted to hay farming by 1852 and indeed was noted for its horses. In the 1831 census, Forty Farm housed 10 people

The construction of the Metropolitan Railway in 1880 effectively destroyed Forty Green, although South Forty Farm continued into the 20th century. In 1928 the farm became the headquarters of the Century Sports Ground. The celebrated gunsmiths Holland & Holland had a shooting ground nearby. As Forty Farm Sports Ground the site of the farm remains green to this day.

The Holland & Ho...
»more


SEPTEMBER
14
2017

 

Ilchester Place, W14
Ilchester Place runs between Abbotsbury Road and Melbury Road, immediately adjacent to the southern boundary of Holland Park itself. Ilchester Place was built in 1929 as a set of small mansion blocks, designed by the architect L Martin.

It takes its name from Edward Fox-Strangways, the Fifth Earl of Ilchester, who bought the estate from Lady Holland in the late 19th century, and continued the process of development on the estate. (See ’History’).

The street is considered to be ‘prime residential’ and consists of large neo-Georgian 3-storey brick-built family houses. It is wide, tree-lined and very quiet. The houses have attractive small front gardens, often with neatly trimmed hedges and well cut lawns, and sub-basement garages. Some of the houses are attractively covered in creeper.

The road is particularly convenient for all the facilities in nearby Holland Park although the houses also have very decent-sized rear gardens.

Due to the width of the road Ilchester Place has a particular feeling of spaciousness.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
11
2017

 

Apex Corner (1920s)
This view of the Apex Corner roundabout shows the original Apex Garage. The Northway Circus roundabout was built as part of general improvements to the road system in the 1920s.

These improvements, along with the North Circular Road, created the Barnet Bypass (A1) and Watford Bypass (A41) which met at the roundabout.

To serve the traffic which passed, a garage called Apex Garage was built on the roundabout. Such was its distinctiveness that 'Northway Circus' began being called 'Apex Corner'.

In time, Apex Corner took over as the name - it is now semi-official, used by Transport For London as the destination on bus routes.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
10
2017

 

Brentford
Brentford was the historic county town of Middlesex. Brentford's economy has diverse company headquarters buildings which mark the start of the M4 corridor; in transport it also has two railway stations and the Boston Manor tube station on its north-west border with Hanwell.

Brentford at the start of its 21st century attracted regeneration of its little-used warehouse premises and docks including the re-modelling of the waterfront to provide more economically active shops, townhouses and apartments, some of which comprises Brentford Dock.

A 19th and 20th centuries mixed social and private housing locality: New Brentford is contiguous with the Osterley neighbourhood of Isleworth and Syon Park and the Great West Road which has most of the largest business premises.

Brentford station was opened in 1849 by the London and South Western Railway.

Between 1950 and 1980 was named Brentford Central.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
7
2017

 

Chingford Lane, E4
Chingford Lane is a main road skirting Woodford Golf Club. Chingford Lane shows some early Warner Estate development with terraced housing dating from the late 1870s.

St.Andrew’s Church of England opened in 1880 with services held in the Working Men’s hall and then in a room nearby. An iron church was erected in 1888. In 1923 the iron was replaced with cement and the frame had moved north to make room for a hall, and kitchen. The original wooden bell-tower was also removed.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
6
2017

 

Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace is the official London residence and principal workplace of the British monarch. Located in the City of Westminster, the palace is a setting for state occasions and royal hospitality. It has been a focus for the British people at times of national rejoicing and crisis.

Originally known as Buckingham House, the building which forms the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1705 on a site which had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. It was subsequently acquired by George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte, and known as The Queen's House. During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard.

Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the East front, which contains the well-known balcony ...
»more


SEPTEMBER
5
2017

 

Garden Museum
The first museum in the world dedicated to the history of gardening. The Garden Museum is based in the deconsecrated parish church of St Mary-at-Lambeth adjacent to Lambeth Palace. The church originally housed the 15th and 16th century tombs of many members of the Howard family, including now-lost memorial brasses to Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (died 1524), his wife Agnes Tilney, Duchess of Norfolk (died 1545) and is also the burial place of Queen Anne Boleyn's mother Elizabeth Boleyn, formerly Howard.

St Mary's, which was largely a Victorian reconstruction, was deconsecrated in 1972 and was scheduled to be demolished. In 1976 John and Rosemary Nicholson traced the tomb of the two 17th century royal gardeners and plant hunters John Tradescant father and son to the churchyard, and were inspired to create the Museum of Garden History.

The museum's main gallery is the main body of the church. The collection comprises tools, ephemera and a library. The tool collection includes items purchased at auction and donations f...
»more


SEPTEMBER
4
2017

 

Abbey Street, SE1
Abbey Street takes its name from Bermondsey Abbey which was situated between Bermondsey Square, Grange Walk and Long Walk. Forerly Great George Street, the street lies on the line of the nave of the abbey church.

The eastern gateway in Grange Walk was demolished in 1760 with the road being extended eastwards some years later.

Neckinger Mills. formerly Bevington & Sons Leather Mills. was one of the most famous tanneries in Bermondsey producing light leathers for shoes and fancy goods. The tanning pits
were located beside the River Neckinger.

It was said that the fish oil used in the tanning process did wonders for the hair and skin of the (largely female) leather workers.

The mills opened in 1801 and continued production until 1981.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
3
2017

 

Doughty Street, WC1N
Doughty Street is a broad tree lined street in the Holborn district. The southern part is a continuation of the short John Street, which comes off Theobalds Road. The northern part crosses Guilford Street and ends at Mecklenburgh Square.

The street contains mainly grade II listed Georgian houses built between 1790 and the 1840s. Many of the houses have been converted into offices and are popular with companies in the legal profession and the media. In the last few years, many of these have been converted back to family homes.

In the nineteenth century, it was an exclusive residential street and had gates at either end to restrict entry and these were manned by porters.

"It was a broad, airy, wholesome street - none of your common thoroughfares, to be rattled through by vulgar cabs and earth-shaking Pickford’s vans; but a self-included property, with a gate at each end, and a lodge with a porter in a gold-laced hat and the Doughty arms on the buttons of his mulberry coat, to prevent any one, except with a mis...
»more


SEPTEMBER
2
2017

 

Addison Road, W14
Addison Road stretches from Holland Park Avenue to Kensington High Street. Addison Road takes its name from Joseph Addison who lived at Holland House. He was an essayist and poet of the late 17th Century whose main claim to fame now is as the founder of the Spectator.

The southern part consists of a busy southbound one-way traffic system. At this end there are two large modern blocks of flats set back from the road. The middle part of the road is the most attractive. It is quiet, tree-lined and has mainly large detached and semi-detached villas, usually painted white. At the north end of Addison Road is Addison Court and unusual 1930’s style 8 storey block of flats.

Many of the houses have large front gardens with small sweeping driveways, and are well set back from the road behind high front walls and gates ensuring maximum secrecy. The grandest house in Addison Road is an ornate blue and green glazed-brick and tiled mansion known as ‘The Peacock House’. This Grade I listed mansion was recently on the market for around £20 ...
»more


SEPTEMBER
1
2017

 

Hendon Park
Hendon Park, totalling 12 hectares, between Queens Road (formerly Butchers Lane) and Shire Hall Lane was created by Hendon Urban District Council in 1903. Hendon Park was part of a medieval estate known as the Steps Fields and owned by the Goodyer family. From 1868 till 1903 it was owned by the Kemp family when Hendon Council opened the park to the public.

The park has a Holocaust Memorial Garden, which contains a pond, many plants and is enclosed by large hedges. The Childrens’ Millennium Wood planted in 2000 is a native tree and grassland area. The rest of the park is mainly informal parkland, with mown grass and mature trees, especially London plane and lime. It is a good spot for watching pipistrelle bats on a summer evening.

The landscape includes one of the largest specimens of Acer palmatum in London. Many mature trees survive from the original planting, despite damage caused by the Great Storm of 1987 during which many trees were uprooted and destroyed.

"Rout the Rumour", a large propaganda rally was held in Hendon Park on Sunday, 21 July 1940. The rally included songs, music and sket...
»more


Sections of The Underground Map text are taken, adapted or remixed from the Wikipedia. Other sections are written by the authors and users of The Underground Map. The Underground Map hereby gives permission for the re-use of all material which is attributed on its website under the Creative Commons License/CC-BY-3.0.