About the project

This is the blog for The Underground Map website – the history site for London.

The project is adding historical maps of London from every decade between 1800 and 1940, a period when London expanded from a city which did not extend beyond Mayfair, Vauxhall, Bethnal Green or Bermondsey. During the Napoleanic Wars at the beginning of this period, Regent’s Park was still countryside and taking the waters of Kilburn was the height of fashion. Our mapping ends at the dawn of the Second World War with London having expanded to its modern size – the Green Belt legislation put paid to further expansion.

There are two parts to the website – the main mapping website and this, the blog, which features London highlights.

To access the main part of the website, search or use the dropdown immediately below.
Or continue to explore the blog – the latest articles can be found at the bottom of this page.

Old and New London: Volume 1 – Temple Bar

Old and New London: Volume 1  was a book published in 1878 by Cassell, Petter & Galpin. Now out of print, it was digitised by the British History Online project. Table of contents Citation: Walter Thornbury, Old and New London: Volume 1 (London, 1878) British History Online www.british-history.ac.uk/old-new-london/vol1 Temple Bar was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, …

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Rossington Avenue, WD6

Rossington Avenue, built in the 1950s, is situated in the north part of Borehamwood. Like other roads on the original Borehamwood estate, it was named for a settlement near to the A1 road – Rossington, a village in South Yorkshire, later became the site for Robin Hood Airport. Borehamwood was planned with small shopping centres …

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