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Plaistow ·
JANUARY
21
2020
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Plaistow
Plaistow is a district in the London Borough of Newham and forms the majority of the London E13 postcode district. Plaistow Road is a former Roman road.

Plaistow, as a name, is believed to come from Sir Hugh de Plaitz who, in 1065, married Philippa de Montfitchet, whose family owned the district. She is reputed to have named it the Manor of Plaiz. A stow was a place of assembly.

Daniel Defoe’s 1724 work, ’Tour of the Eastern Counties’ mentions Plaistow as a town in which there had been much new building as well as repairs to existing houses.

The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway line from Bow to Barking was constructed through the middle of the Parish of West Ham in 1858. The new line opened with stations at Bromley, Plaistow and East Ham.

James Thorne, in his 1876 ’Handbook to the Environs of London’ recounts the changes to the village of Plaistow, with the gentry and merchants having gone and the occupations of the residents changed from agricultural and pastoral to manufacturing.

In 1886...

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Featured articles

JANUARY
11
2020

 

Plaistow
Plaistow is a district in the London Borough of Newham and forms the majority of the London E13 postcode district. Plaistow Road is a former Roman road.

Plaistow, as a name, is believed to come from Sir Hugh de Plaitz who, in 1065, married Philippa de Montfitchet, whose family owned the district. She is reputed to have named it the Manor of Plaiz. A stow was a place of assembly.

Daniel Defoe’s 1724 work, ’Tour of the Eastern Counties’ mentions Plaistow as a town in which there had been much new building as well as repairs to existing houses.

The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway line from Bow to Barking was constructed through the middle of the Parish of West Ham in 1858. The new line opened with stations at Bromley, Plaistow and East Ham.

James Thorne, in his 1876 ’Handbook to the Environs of London’ recounts the changes to the village of Plaistow, with the gentry and merchants having gone and the occupations of the residents changed from agricultural and pastoral to manufacturing.

In 1886...
»more


JANUARY
10
2020

 

Abbey Road, E15
Abbey Road has a name derived from the Cistercian abbey of Stratford Langthorne. The abbey was founded about the year 1135 by Walter de Montfichet. It was a ’daughter house’ of the monastery of Savigney, France. The Cistercian Monks here were known as the ’white monks’ due to their white habits. The pathway which is now Abbey Road may even predate the abbey - it became a route from the church in West Ham Church to the abbey.

The abbey had a particular responsibility for the upkeep of the nearby bridge over the River Lea.

Sir Hubert Llewellyn Smith wrote a history of East London in 1939 and discussed the nursery rhyme ’London Bridge Is Falling Down’. The verses in the rhyme about repairing the bridge with bread, iron, gold and silver applied to the Lea bridge nearby he proposed as the monks used these very items in their time.

Henry VIII dissolved the abbey and the duty to drain the marsh was passed to the new owners of the lands that once belonged to the abbey.

Abbey Road (by then Abbey Lane)...
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JANUARY
9
2020

 

The Railway Tavern
The Railway Tavern was generally known as Charlie Brown’s. The pub lay beside a railway bridge on the corner of Garford Street and close to the gates of the West India Dock.

It was built around 1840 and was greatly extended in 1919.

Charlie Brown, the landlord between 1893 until 1932, hosted in his pub a museum of curiosities gathered from all over the world, brought by seaman sailing to and from the docks. The majority of items in the collection were from the Far East and Pacific. Charlie Brown would pay for any interesting items not already in his collection.

Charlie was a flamboyant character who, alongside being a publican, kept a stable of horses and would ride along the West and East India Dock Roads in riding gear.

Charlie died in 1932 at the age of 72 and his funeral was a renowned East End occasion.

On his death, Charlie Brown’s daughter Ethel took over the Railway Tavern until 1936.

His son - also called Charlie Brown - took over the Blue P...
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JANUARY
8
2020

 

Hog Lane, WC2H
Hog Lane was a lane that went from St Giles’ leper hospital (set up in the 12th century) to the monument to Eleanor at Charing Cross. Also known as Crown Street, like many London streets, Hog Lane became a busy thoroughfare. The name possible derived from the location of a pound at St. Giles, where animals were held as they were driven into London, as a stop before the final journey to the City markets. The road dates from around 1675.

Hog Lane was to eventually form the foundations the part of what we now know as Charing Cross Road north of Cambridge Circus.
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JANUARY
7
2020

 

Tower of London
The Tower of London is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames and lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The Tower of London was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078

As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains, despite later activity on the site.
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JANUARY
6
2020

 

Romford
Romford is the administrative centre of the London Borough of Havering and one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. Romford was originally a market town in Essex. The town developed on the main road to London with Romford Market was established in 1247.

The railway station open in 1839 which was key to the development of the Star Brewery. The Eastern Counties Railway services operated between Mile End and Romford, with extensions to Brentwood and to Shoreditch in 1840. A second station was opened in 1892 by the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway, giving Romford a rail connection to Tilbury Docks. The two stations were combined in 1934.

There was a shift from agriculture to light industry during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and then to retail and commerce.

In the 20th century, Romford significantly expanded, becoming a municipal borough in 1937 and part of Greater London since 1965 when the area was transferred from Essex.


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JANUARY
5
2020

 

Frith Street, W1D
Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder. Frith Street was laid out in the late 1670s but is marked on Rocque’s map mistakenly as "Thrift Street".

After the late 18th century, the street became the home to many artistic and literary people including the artist John Constable, painter John Alexander Gresse, politician John Horne Tooke and John Bell, the sculptor. William Hazlitt wrote his last essays while he was lodging at no. 6.

A young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart stayed at no. 20 with his father and sister in 1764–65. From 1924 to 1926 John Logie Baird lived at no. 22 where in 1926 he demonstrated television to members of the Royal Institution.

Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club moved to 47 Frith Street.

In 1989, the Frith Street Gallery was founded here though in 2007 the gallery moved to Golden Square.
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JANUARY
4
2020

 

Grahame Park
Grahame Park was built on the site of the old Hendon Aerodrome. The estate is named in honour of Claude Grahame-White, the aviation pioneer who established the Hendon Aerodrome and aviation school on the site. Most roads, blocks and walkways have names linked to the aviation history of the site.

The building of the estate was a joint project between the Greater London Council and Barnet Council. The estate was designed in a ’Brutalist. style and the first residents moved in during October 1971. Barnet Council is refurbishing much of the estate with a 2032 completion date.

The Royal Air Force Museum is situated immediately to the south-east of the estate.
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JANUARY
3
2020

 

Maudsley Hospital
The Maudsley Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in the Denmark Hill area. In 1907, a leading psychiatrist, Henry Maudsley, offered London County Council £30,000 to help found a new mental hospital that would be exclusively for early/acute cases rather than chronic cases. It was to have an out-patients’ clinic and provide for teaching and research.

The Council agreed to contribute half the building costs and then covered the running costs which were almost twice as high per bed as the large asylums.

Construction of the hospital was completed in 1915. Before it could open, the building was requisitioned to treat war veterans.

After the war it was returned to the control of London County Council and it finally opened as the Maudsley Hospital in February 1923.

The Maudsley is now the largest mental health training institution in the UK.
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JANUARY
2
2020

 

Denmark Hill
Denmark Hill is an area named after a street (and hill) in Camberwell. Nearby streets whose names refer to different aspects of the same topographical feature include Dog Kennel Hill, Champion Hill and Red Post Hill. It marks the edge of the Thames valley plain in this area — from here to the river the land is flat.

The original name for the summit was Dulwich Hill. The name of the area was changed to Denmark Hill in honour of the husband of Queen Anne, Prince George of Denmark, who lived there.

The area is home of the Maudsley Hospital and King’s College Hospital, and also of Ruskin Park, named after John Ruskin, who once lived nearby. The preface to Ruskin’s ’Unto This Last’ is dated ’Denmark Hill, 10th May, 1862’.

The Salvation Army’s William Booth Memorial Training College on Champion Park which was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott was completed in 1932; it towers over South London. It has a similar monumental impressiveness to Gilbert Scott’s other...
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JANUARY
1
2020

 

Vine Hill, EC1R
Vine Hill now displays no evidence on the vines that once flourished in the grounds on which it stands. Vine Hill is a cul-de-sac with a steep flight of steps leads up to busy Rosebery Avenue.

Nearly 500 years ago, the gardens of the Bishops of Ely covered the land between here and their town house east of Hatton Garden.

In the late 16th century, Sir Christopher Hatton - with the help of Queen Elizabeth - had seized most of the estate. The estate then passed down through three generations to Baron Hatton of Kirby in 1640. Financial difficulties caused him to dispose of it and by 1660 Hatton Garden and a series of smaller roads had replaced both house and grounds.

The Hatton vineyard was swept away in about 1710 when this area was developed.
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