The Underground Map


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FEBRUARY
27
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Argyll Street, W1F
Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century. Sixty acres in the parish of St Martin in the Fields were granted in January 1560 by Queen Elizabeth to William Dodington. In 1622, Richard Wilson sold some 35 acres of them to William Maddox, a merchant taylor of London.

Maddox’s estate comprised 11½ acres called Millfield. Millfield, which took its name from Tyburn Mill, was on ’the east side of the highway from Charing Cross’ (i.e. Swallow Street).

The western portion of Millfield was bisected by a footpath leading from the north-west corner of the field to the gate on the north side of Six Acre Close. This footpath later became Kingly Street. Benjamin Maddox’s lease of Millfield to James Kendrick in 1670 marked the beginning of building development. Kendrick sub-let the ground to various tenants who began to build. At the end of the seventeenth century, Abraham Bridle and John James had a sub-lease of land fronting Tyburn Road, where they started building. Bridle gave his name to a passage o...

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Featured articles

FEBRUARY
26
2020

 

Argyll Street, W1F
Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century. Sixty acres in the parish of St Martin in the Fields were granted in January 1560 by Queen Elizabeth to William Dodington. In 1622, Richard Wilson sold some 35 acres of them to William Maddox, a merchant taylor of London.

Maddox’s estate comprised 11½ acres called Millfield. Millfield, which took its name from Tyburn Mill, was on ’the east side of the highway from Charing Cross’ (i.e. Swallow Street).

The western portion of Millfield was bisected by a footpath leading from the north-west corner of the field to the gate on the north side of Six Acre Close. This footpath later became Kingly Street. Benjamin Maddox’s lease of Millfield to James Kendrick in 1670 marked the beginning of building development. Kendrick sub-let the ground to various tenants who began to build. At the end of the seventeenth century, Abraham Bridle and John James had a sub-lease of land fronting Tyburn Road, where they started building. Bridle gave his name to a passage o...
»more


FEBRUARY
15
2020

 

Arnos Grove
Arnos Grove is an area within the London Borough of Enfield. It was originally a medieval estate of the Arnold family in Middlesex. Its natural grove, much larger than today, was for many centuries the largest woodland in the chapelry of Southgate. It became associated with Arnolds (Arnos) Park when its owner was permitted to enclose much of its area from common land to create the former park.

The modern district of Arnos Grove is centred on the western end of Bowes Road. The Arnos Grove estate was centred on the modern Morton Crescent.

Arnos Grove station opened on 19 September 1932 as the terminus on the first section of the Piccadilly line extension from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters. Services were further extended northward on 13 March 1933. The station was designed by architect Charles Holden, and has been described as a significant work of modern architecture. It is Grade II listed.
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FEBRUARY
5
2020

 

Blackmoor Street, WC2B
Blackmoor Street was in the Drury Lane slum. The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are n...
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FEBRUARY
4
2020

 

Earnshaw Street, WC2H
Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street. Earnshaw Street runs south from New Oxford Street and was built as a result of, the construction of New Oxford Street in 1844–1847. The new street followed a path which went from New Oxford Street to St Giles’s Church.

Arthur Street was renamed after Thomas Earnshaw, a Bloomsbury-based maker of chronometers.

Its original buildings were demolished and replaced by large Ministry of Defence premises, occupying the whole area between Earnshaw Street, Bucknall Street, St Giles High Street, and Dyott Street. In 2007, these buildings in turn were demolished to make way for the St Giles Court development.
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FEBRUARY
3
2020

 

Argyle Street, WC1H
Argyle Street, originally Manchester Street, was named after the former Argyle House. On Tompson’s map of 1803 this area was laid out as fields - there were no previous streets or buildings here.

Argyle Street had been planned by its developers Dunstan, Flanders, and Robinson in 1823–1824 but was begun in 1832. Cruchley’s map of 1827 shows its extent only planned as far as Dutton Street. The whole street was finished by 1849.

It absorbed the former Manchester Street and was then renumbered.

Charles Dickens’s sister Fanny and her husband Henry Burnett, a singer and music teacher, lived here in 1839.

The development was aimed at the working classes. However, it was decidedly middle-class in the 1841 census, with many resident barristers, clerks and a solicitor.

By 1848 the entire area was reported to be overcrowded and squalid. When G. H. Duckworth walked round the area in July 1898 as part of an update of Booth’s poverty maps, he noted the existence of a ’home for fallen women’ at t...
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FEBRUARY
2
2020

 

Junction Road, N19
Junction Road dates from 1813. Junction Road was built at the same time, and as part of the same scheme as the then-new Archway Road and laid out as an area of working class housing. The early residents were largely those who had to move from the St Pancras area as that station was built.

Junction Road is now home to Archway Tower, a building whose appearance is locally divisive.

Junction Road railway station stood on the corner of Junction Road and Station Road until its closure in 1960 as a good line. Passenger services ran from 1872 to 1916.

In 2004 Junction Road was branded “the worst street in the borough” for its level of grime, graffiti and “festering rubbish” but has since improved greatly due to the efforts of Islington Council.

The street has a number of notable restaurants, bars and pubs.
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FEBRUARY
1
2020

 

Oxendon Street, W1D
Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby. Panton Street and Oxendon Street stand on the site of the close of land marked on the plan of 1585 as Scavengers Close. The area of Scavengers Close was three acres, but discrepancies in measurements were of frequent occurrence at this date.

Scavengers Close was bought by Henry VIII from the Mercers’ Company and described in a list of the "Kynges new purchest landes" as "iii acres of pasture in a close ny to the muse" in the tenure of Thomas Wood.

The plan of 1585 shows a building marked "Gynnpowder howse" in the north-west corner and three other small buildings, one of which may have been the conduit referred to in various deeds. In 1619 Richard Wilson, a descendant of Thomas, sold extensive property in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields to Robert Baker, whose widow, together with her daughter Mary and her son-in-law, Henry Oxenden, in 1637 granted a 32 years’ lease of "a messuage, a cookhouse, a tennis court and 4 acres of ground" there to Simo...
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