The Underground Map


 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  BLOG 
18.232.51.69 
Oxford Circus ·
APRIL
8
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Great Marlborough Street, W1F
Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. In the 16th century, the land it was laid out over belonged to the Mercer’s Company but was surrendered to Henry VIII in 1536.

The land was subsequently owned by a brewer Thomas Wilson whose son Richard sold it to William Maddox in 1622. Maddox called the estate ’Millfield’.

In 1670, William Maddox’s son Benjamin let the land to James Kendrick who in turn sub-let what is now Great Marlborough Street to John Steele. The land remained undeveloped, with building focusing on Tyburn Road (Oxford Street) to the north.

The street began development in the early 18th century, when Steele let five acres of land to Joseph Collens for property development. It was named after John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough who as commander of the English Army won the Battle of Blenheim in 1704.

The Pantheon was based at the far eastern end of Great Marlborough Street, built on what had previously been gardens in 1772. A popular place of e...

»more



 

Featured articles

APRIL
2
2020

 

Great Marlborough Street, W1F
Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough. In the 16th century, the land it was laid out over belonged to the Mercer’s Company but was surrendered to Henry VIII in 1536.

The land was subsequently owned by a brewer Thomas Wilson whose son Richard sold it to William Maddox in 1622. Maddox called the estate ’Millfield’.

In 1670, William Maddox’s son Benjamin let the land to James Kendrick who in turn sub-let what is now Great Marlborough Street to John Steele. The land remained undeveloped, with building focusing on Tyburn Road (Oxford Street) to the north.

The street began development in the early 18th century, when Steele let five acres of land to Joseph Collens for property development. It was named after John Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough who as commander of the English Army won the Battle of Blenheim in 1704.

The Pantheon was based at the far eastern end of Great Marlborough Street, built on what had previously been gardens in 1772. A popular place of e...
»more


APRIL
1
2020

 

Orange Square, SW1W
Orange Square is a small open area in Belgravia. Under the mature London plane trees of Orange Square is a statue of a young Mozart by Philip Jackson. Mozart as an eight year old lived at 180 Ebury Street in 1764 and 1765 while on a grand tour of Europe with his father. There, the child prodigy composed his first two symphonies.

In 1764, Orange Square - then called Pimlico Green - was an open area with sheep and donkeys grazing, and market gardens providing local vegetables.

Orange Square has a pub called The Orange which started as the Orange Coffee House and Tavern in 1776.

A timber yard was built around 1839 by John Newson who lived and worked from 19 Bloomfield Terrace. He built the houses of Bloomfield Terrace, called after the original name of his wife as well as some in the neighbouring streets of Ebury Street and Bourne Street. The shops on Pimlico Road, which date from the early 1840s are the oldest surviving buildings on Orange Square. Around this time the informal name Pimlico...
»more


PREVIOUSLY ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP...

Print-friendly version of this page