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Website · Old Oak Common · NW6 · Contributed by Scott Hatton
MARCH
16
2017



The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
There are now over 23 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - use the Google Map control to change to a particular decade.The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

AUGUST
16
2018

 

Goodhall Street, NW10
Goodhall Street is part of the Old Oak Lane Estate. Goodhall Street is part of some rows of cottages had been built in 1889 by the LNWR for its employees in nearby Willesden Junction. Originally, the whole estate was simply called Railway Cottages. The London and Northwestern Railway, (LNWR) was the largest railway company in the country at the time.

Between 1915 and 1935, a new pub, The Fisherman’s Arms, appears to have replaced three houses on Old Oak Lane to serve the estate.

Late 19th century public health legislation had brought about general improvements in housing. Nevertheless the uniform rows of Old Oak made a fairly hard edged environment. Although there are subtle variations of facing brick and detail from one terrace to another, the overall impression is one of uniformity.
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AUGUST
6
2018

 

Golborne Road, W10
Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John's Church in Paddington. Until the middle of the nineteenth century it was no more than a country footpath crossing the fields of Portobello Farm, but in 1870 the road was widened, shops were built and the road was extended over the railway.

It was planted with trees and named Britannia Road. Later the trees were cut down and the street was called Golbourne and later Golborne Road.

By the beginning of the twentieth century, the area was one of the most overcrowded and poverty-stricken in London.

The thoroughfare was extensively bombed during WWII, after which the Victorian-era slums were cleared to make way for the Trellick and the Swinbrook and Wornington estates, which housed immigrant arrivals from the Caribbean.

Stella McCartney moved into a chapel on Golborne Road next to a curry house in 2002, heralding its arrival as a fashionable destination. Now going the way of upmarket Portobello Road (which intersects it), gastropubs ...
»more


AUGUST
5
2018

 

Old Kent Road, SE1
The Old Kent Road is famous as the cheapest property on the London Monopoly board. The route of Old Kent Road is one of the oldest trackways in England and was first metalled by the Romans as the road from Dover to Londinium. The Saxons later called this Watling Street. Chaucer’s pilgrims travelled along this route from London and Southwark on their way to Canterbury.

Although the name appears as simply Old Kent Road on maps, it is usually referred to by Londoners as The Old Kent Road. The Old Kent Road runs from the Bricklayers’ Arms roundabout, where it meets the New Kent Road, Tower Bridge Road, and Great Dover Street, to New Cross Road, which begins a little to the east of the mainline railway bridge - the change in street-name is coincident with the border with Lewisham borough. Before the county of London was created this would have been the boundary between Surrey and Kent, hence the change in name.

At the junction with the presently named Shornecliff Road (previously Thomas Street) was the bridge cross...
»more


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