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Arnos Grove ·
FEBRUARY
18
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Arnos Grove
Arnos Grove is an area within the London Borough of Enfield. It was originally a medieval estate of the Arnold family in Middlesex. Its natural grove, much larger than today, was for many centuries the largest woodland in the chapelry of Southgate. It became associated with Arnolds (Arnos) Park when its owner was permitted to enclose much of its area from common land to create the former park.

The modern district of Arnos Grove is centred on the western end of Bowes Road. The Arnos Grove estate was centred on the modern Morton Crescent.

Arnos Grove station opened on 19 September 1932 as the terminus on the first section of the Piccadilly line extension from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters. Services were further extended northward on 13 March 1933. The station was designed by architect Charles Holden, and has been described as a significant work of modern architecture. It is Grade II listed.

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Featured articles

FEBRUARY
15
2020

 

Arnos Grove
Arnos Grove is an area within the London Borough of Enfield. It was originally a medieval estate of the Arnold family in Middlesex. Its natural grove, much larger than today, was for many centuries the largest woodland in the chapelry of Southgate. It became associated with Arnolds (Arnos) Park when its owner was permitted to enclose much of its area from common land to create the former park.

The modern district of Arnos Grove is centred on the western end of Bowes Road. The Arnos Grove estate was centred on the modern Morton Crescent.

Arnos Grove station opened on 19 September 1932 as the terminus on the first section of the Piccadilly line extension from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters. Services were further extended northward on 13 March 1933. The station was designed by architect Charles Holden, and has been described as a significant work of modern architecture. It is Grade II listed.
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FEBRUARY
1
2020

 

Oxendon Street, W1D
Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby. Panton Street and Oxendon Street stand on the site of the close of land marked on the plan of 1585 as Scavengers Close. The area of Scavengers Close was three acres, but discrepancies in measurements were of frequent occurrence at this date.

Scavengers Close was bought by Henry VIII from the Mercers’ Company and described in a list of the "Kynges new purchest landes" as "iii acres of pasture in a close ny to the muse" in the tenure of Thomas Wood.

The plan of 1585 shows a building marked "Gynnpowder howse" in the north-west corner and three other small buildings, one of which may have been the conduit referred to in various deeds. In 1619 Richard Wilson, a descendant of Thomas, sold extensive property in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields to Robert Baker, whose widow, together with her daughter Mary and her son-in-law, Henry Oxenden, in 1637 granted a 32 years’ lease of "a messuage, a cookhouse, a tennis court and 4 acres of ground" there to Simo...
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