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Borehamwood ·
MAY
26
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Clarendon Road, WD6
Clarendon Road runs north from Shenley Road. The road is older than most streets in Borehamwood, dating as it does from prior to the First World War. It receives its name from the Earl of Essex and Clarendon who also built the Nascot estate in Watford a few decades previous to its construction.

Clarendon Road and Eldon Avenue are now the two entrances into the BBC Elstree Centre, previously ATV/Central TV and the Rock Studios before that.

»more

MAY
13
2020

 

Streatham Vale
The development of Streatham Vale dates from the 1920s Although the Greyhound Inn was established around 1730, the area was rural until the early twentieth century.

In 1875, the western half of Greyhound Lane became Streatham Vale.

From 1922, the Streatham Vale Estate - built largely by two firms, R.H. Miller and Wates of Norbury - kickstarted suburban development.

Around 1930 schools opened on Streatham Vale, the Greyhound Inn was rebuilt and the River Graveney was culverted to prevent flooding.
»read full article


MAY
12
2020

 

Abercairn Road, SW16
Abercairn Road was the first road laid out in the Streatham Vale Estate Abercairn Road and its offshoots were first constructed by the builder R.H. Miller in 1922.
»read full article


MAY
11
2020

 

Eardley Road, SW16
Eardley Road dates from the 1870s In 1875, the local station was renamed Streatham Common in place of its former name of Greyhound Lane.

Just after this date, the first houses appeared on Eardley Road and a handful of industries were established, bringing local employment opportunities.
»read full article


MAY
10
2020

 

Streatham Vale, SW16
Streatham Vale was created when Greyhound Lane was split in two by the arrival of the railway The lane began as a track connecting Mitcham with Norwood. By 1730, the Greyhound Inn was in existance.

The opening of Greyhound^ Lane station in 1862 at first brought few changes to the rural area. In 1875 the station was renamed Streatham Common and after that date half of Greyhound Lane became Streatham Vale.

In 1922, the Streatham Vale Estate was built. The building firm Wates of Norbury built eastwards from Streatham Vale to the railway.

Subsequently, schools opened on either side of Streatham Vale and the Greyhound Inn was rebuilt.
»read full article




 

APRIL
30
2016

 

Paddington
The first underground railway station in the world ran from Paddington - opened as Paddington (Bishop's Road) by the Metropolitan Railway on 10 January 1863 as the terminus of the company's route from Farringdon. Paddington mainline railway station - Paddington station - has a commuter service serving stations west of London, a mainline service to Oxford, Bristol, Bath, Taunton, Devon, Cornwall and South Wales. There is also an express rail line to Heathrow Airport.

In Paddington Station there is a display case showing Paddington Bear, a character of children's fiction who, in the book, is first discovered at this station and hence named after it.

Important places in Paddington include St Mary's Hospital - where penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming - and Paddington Green police station.

Alan Turing, the pioneer mathematician was born in Warrington Crescent.
»read full article


APRIL
28
2016

 

Eastminster
Eastminster (The Abbey of St. Mary de Graces) was a Cistercian abbey on Tower Hill and founded by Edward III in 1350. It was located just outside the Roman London Wall. New Abbey was its alternative name.

The abbey was dissolved in 1538, and the site has for centuries been occupied by the London part of the Royal Mint.
»read full article


APRIL
25
2016

 

The 'Royal Blue' horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road (1912)
The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge's. The shops behind, including Boots the Chemist, Stewart & Wright's Cocoa Rooms and the Northumberland Hotel, are covered in advertisements.
»read full article


APRIL
23
2016

 

Bullbaiters Farm
Bullbaiters Farm near Boreham Wood was originally called Bullbeggar's Farm - Bullbeggar meaning 'hobgoblin' or 'scarecrow'. Above the central door was the Byng family crest - onwers of the farm, who were based in Wrotham Park, South Mimms.

In the 1861 census, the occupant of Bullbaiters Farm was 60 year old William King, who farmed 190 acres and employed 3 men and 2 boys. In addition to his family two farm labourers also lived in the farm. Thrift Farm, nearby, was occupied by a farm labourer according to the census - so it may have been used as a farm cottage. Quite often, especially involving what had been smaller tenanted farms, the fields would be combined into a larger farm and the 'redundant' farm house used as farm cottages.
»read full article


APRIL
21
2016

 

Finstock Road, W10
Finstock Road is a turning out of Oxford Gardens. Finstock is an Oxfordshire place name.
»read full article


APRIL
19
2016

 

Avenue Farm
Cowhouse Farm was linked to Hodford Farm in Golders Green for a long period. As Cricklewood suburbanised, the farm became surrounded by housing. Latterly Dickers Farm and finally Avenue Farm, it was closed in 1932.

Its access track finally became Farm Avenue.
»read full article


APRIL
17
2016

 

Lothrop Street (1907)
2015 Postcode of a street in the Queen’s Park Estate
»read full article


APRIL
10
2016

 

Barnet Gate Wood
This small woodland is public open space, owned and managed by Barnet Council. It is a remnant of the extensive Middlesex Forest which covered most of this area after the last Ice Age.

Barnet Gate Wood is a small ancient woodland, with a canopy of oak and hornbeam, and an understorey dominated by rhododendron. Some of the hornbeam are in strange shapes as they were originally trained as hedges and then allowed go wild.

The entrance is by a path from Hendon Wood Lane, near the junction with Barnet Road. There is also access from the Dollis Valley Greenwalk and London Loop, at wooden posts numbered 12 and 13, which are points on the Barnet Gate Wood Nature Trail.

Barnet Gate Wood is part of Moat Mount Open Space and Mote End Farm, a Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Borough Grade II.

»read full article


APRIL
7
2016

 

Highwood Hill, NW7
Highwood Hill links the Rising Sun pub with Totteridge. Highwood Hill marks the junction of two ridges, one stretching east to Totteridge and the other south-east through Holcombe Hill to Mill Hill and Bittacy Hill.

“It is no uncommon thing to see 100 loads of hay go up to London on market day and each of the teams bring back a load of dung for dressing the land”, writes John Middleton in his "View of the Agriculture of Middlesex" (1798).

Hay farming, he says, was mixed with sheep farming; pig farming too “purchased fat by the hog­butchers of London”.

Some got rich through hay farming and some built many large mansions along Totteridge Lane, Highwood Hill and The Ridgeway. The landlords of these properties were allowed to enclose fields all over the area and the common lands, where the poor could graze their pigs, cows and geese, became much smaller and fewer, impoverishing those dependent on such land.

Lavish parks were laid out around their mansions, and the resident...
»more


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