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Arnos Grove ·
FEBRUARY
24
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Arnos Grove
Arnos Grove is an area within the London Borough of Enfield. It was originally a medieval estate of the Arnold family in Middlesex. Its natural grove, much larger than today, was for many centuries the largest woodland in the chapelry of Southgate. It became associated with Arnolds (Arnos) Park when its owner was permitted to enclose much of its area from common land to create the former park.

The modern district of Arnos Grove is centred on the western end of Bowes Road. The Arnos Grove estate was centred on the modern Morton Crescent.

Arnos Grove station opened on 19 September 1932 as the terminus on the first section of the Piccadilly line extension from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters. Services were further extended northward on 13 March 1933. The station was designed by architect Charles Holden, and has been described as a significant work of modern architecture. It is Grade II listed.

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Featured articles

JUNE
26
2016

 

Woodhouse College
Woodhouse College is a further education establishment which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 19. After the First World War, the former residence of ornamental plasterer Thomas Collins (1735–1830) in the Woodhouse area of Finchley was reconstructed; the house became The Woodhouse School in 1923. A blue plaque commemorating Thomas Collins is on the wall outside the present college office. The school coat of arms with the motto ’Cheerfulness with Industry’ is still displayed above the stage in the college hall.

During the Second World War, the school continued to function while the basement was used by the ARP service. The names of the forty-seven former pupils who died during WWII are recorded in a hand-illuminated Roll of Honour which hangs at the foot of the main staircase near the front entrance to the college.

The Roll of Honour also records the names of the four houses of the old grammar school: Gordon, Livingstone, Nightingale and Scott.
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JUNE
20
2016

 

25 Park Lane
25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon. Sassoon’s Park Lane home was previously owned by his parents Edward Sassoon and Aline Caroline de Rothschild. It was by all accounts a great town house and a great venue for entertaining.

Built in 1895-6 by T. H.Smith and C. E. Sayer for Barney Barnato a South African the house was 13,000 square feet. Peter Stansky author describes the house as having had a four-story-high marble staircase, a conservatory, a winter garden and a ballroom.

Previously decorated by his mother Lady Sassoon after the First World War he undertook extensive changes filling the house with French Furniture, tapestries and his most important paintings. The ballroom was painted by Jose Maria Sert who also painted a room at Port Lympne Mansion.

In 1920 Peter Stanksky notes that Sassoon commissioned him to do the room, despite the distress the Port Lympne Mansion rooms had bought on. The work was entitled Caravans of the East which covered the walls with Greek temple...
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JUNE
19
2016

 

St Mary Matfelon
St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel. For more than 600 years a Christian church stood on the site of Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel High Street. St Mary Matfelon was the second-oldest church in Stepney, having been created as a chapel-of-ease for the local area in the 13th century. A new church was built on the site, largely paid for by Octavius Coope, in 1877.

On 26 August 1880, the new church was devastated by fire, leaving only its tower, vestry and church rooms intact. It was rebuilt, opening in 1882.

On 29 December 1940, a Nazi fire raid destroyed the church. It was left in disrepair until it was finally demolished in 1952. The site of the church became St Mary’s Gardens in 1966 and is now a public park called Altab Ali Park. An outline of the footprint of the church is all that remains of it.

The outside of the original church in the middle ages was whitewashed. Its bright white colour prompted locals to call it the ’white chapel’ which became the name of the area.
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JUNE
16
2016

 

Camden Road
Camden Road is one of the few railway stations in England in which there is a police station. The first Camden Road (North London Railway) station was opened in 1850 and was situated on the east side of what is now St. Pancras Way. It was renamed Camden Town (NLR) on 1 July 1870 but was closed on 5 December 1870 when it was replaced by the second station situated a short distance to the west.

The present Camden Road station is the second station of this name (the first, on the North London Railway lasted from 1850-1870) and is located at the corner of Royal College Street and Camden Road. Designed by Edwin Henry Horne and opened as "Camden Town" by the North London Railway on 5 December 1870, it was renamed "Camden Road" on 25 September 1950 to avoid confusion with the London Underground Northern line Camden Town which had opened in 1907. Thus, between 1907 and 1950, there were two stations called ’Camden Town’.

In addition to the frequent local passenger service, the station is a busy location for freight traffic due to its proximity to the j...
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JUNE
13
2016

 

Ark Burlington Danes Academy
Burlington Danes Academy is a Church of England non-selective, co-educational secondary school within the English academy programme, located on a 10-acre site. The school re-opened as an academy in September 2006, but traces its origins to two separate schools, Burlington School for girls founded in 1699 and St Clement Danes School, founded in 1862, both originally situated in Westminster.

St Clement Danes moved to Du Cane Road in 1928, while Burlington school for Girls took over a magnificent Art Deco building in 1937. Almost 40 years later, in 1976, the two schools merged to create Burlington Danes Church of England School.

The school accepts students between the ages of 3 and 18 and the total school capacity is 1620.
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JUNE
2
2016

 

St Martin Pomary
St Martin Pomeroy was a parish church in the Cheap ward of the City of London. The church stood on the east side of Ironmonger Lane in the Cheap ward of the City of London. John Stow suggested that the name "Pomary" indicated that apple trees had once grown near the church. The patronage of the church belonged to the prior and canons of St Bartholomew the Great, until the dissolution of the priory, when it passed to the Crown.

In 1627 much of the north wall had to be rebuilt, and two years later the whole church was "repaired and beautified" at the cost of the parishioners. The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt. Instead the parish was united with that of St Olave Jewry and the site of the church retained as a burial ground.

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