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Highbury ·
MAY
29
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Newington Green, N16
Newington Green is a road, open space and neighbourhood on the border between Islington and Hackney. Appearing in the Domesday Survey of 1086, the main activity for centuries was agriculture - latterly growing hay for nearby London.

In the 16th century, the area became connected to the court of Henry VIII. The king reputedly used a house on the south side of the Green and in 1523 a resident of the north side of the Green, in Brook House, was the future 6th Earl of Northumberland, Henry Percy. He was noted for his role in the affairs of Anne Boleyn. Brook House was later demolished, renamed Bishop’s Place, and divided into tenements.

The area became the home of English Dissenters during the 17th century. They moved to places tolerant of them and one such place was Newington Green. A dissenting academy was set up on north of the Green, run by Charles Morton. One of the academy’s students was Daniel Defoe, the writer famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe. Another pupil was Samuel Wesley, father of John Wesley.

One of the most notable resi...

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MAY
15
2020

 

Mildmay Park, N1
Mildmay Park was named after Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer under Elizabeth I Sir Walter Mildmay was one of the special commissioners in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots. He founded Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1584.

Many 1850s thoroughfares are named after Mildmay, including Mildmay Road, Mildmay Grove North and Mildmay Grove South.

Mildmay Park became a Jewish area in the late nineteenth century until the 1930s, and had a radical club and a synagogue. The club’s premises survive as the home of the less radical Mildmay Club.

Mildmay Park was also a station on the North London Railway and situated on the street. Opened in 1880, it closed in 1934. The station building was demolished in 1987, but remnants of the platforms can still be seen at track level.
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MAY
14
2020

 

Clarendon Road, WD6
Clarendon Road runs north from Shenley Road The road is older than most streets in Borehamwood, dating as it does from prior to the First World War. It receives its name from the Earl of Essex and Clarendon who also built the Nascot estate in Watford a few decades previous to its construction.

Clarendon Road and Eldon Avenue are now the two entrances into the BBC Elstree Centre, previously ATV/Central TV and the Rock Studios before that.
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MAY
13
2020

 

Streatham Vale
The development of Streatham Vale dates from the 1920s Although the Greyhound Inn was established around 1730, the area was rural until the early twentieth century.

In 1875, the western half of Greyhound Lane became Streatham Vale.

From 1922, the Streatham Vale Estate - built largely by two firms, R.H. Miller and Wates of Norbury - kickstarted suburban development.

Around 1930 schools opened on Streatham Vale, the Greyhound Inn was rebuilt and the River Graveney was culverted to prevent flooding.
»read full article


MAY
12
2020

 

Abercairn Road, SW16
Abercairn Road was the first road laid out in the Streatham Vale Estate Abercairn Road and its offshoots were first constructed by the builder R.H. Miller in 1922.
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OCTOBER
18
2016

 

Wentworth Street (1901)
Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London. The earliest depiction of Wentworth Street appears c.1560, bounded by hedges. The area immediately east of Petticoat Lane (Middlesex Street) was built up by the 1640s with substantial houses divided by yards and gardens. The southern side of Wentworth Street had properties whereas the northern side formed the boundary of the Tenter Ground, an open space used for stretching and drying silk (there were several 'tenter grounds' in the immediate area).

The northern side east of Brick Lane formed the southern boundary of the Fossan Estate.

The street was so named after Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Cleveland who owned much land in the area in the 1630s and 1640s, although early maps call it 'Wentford Street' and 'Winford Street', probably both unintentional errors.

The entire length of Wentworth Street from Petticoat Lane to Brick Lane was strongly defined by buildings by the 1740s. By the 19th century, much of the street had fallen on hard times, ...
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OCTOBER
16
2016

 

Whitehall Close, WD6
Whitehall Close was named for the Whitehall Studios which formerly stood on the site. It was built in the early part of the 21st century after the final demolition of a cinema screen manufacturer which stood on the site before,
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OCTOBER
8
2016

 

St Benet Sherehog
St Benet Sherehog was a medieval parish church built before the year 1111 in Cordwainer Ward, in what was then the wool-dealing district. A shere hog is a castrated ram after its first shearing.
The church was originally dedicated to St Osyth. Sise Lane in the parish uses an abbreviated form of the saint’s name. The historian John Stow believed that the later dedication of "Benet Sherehog" was derived from a corruption of the name of Bennet Shorne, a benefactor of the church in the reign of Edward II.

The patronage of the church belonged to the monastery of St Mary Overy until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown.

Matthew Griffith chaplain to Charles I was rector from 1640 until 1642, when he was removed from the post and imprisoned after preaching a sermon entitled "A Pathetical Persuasion to Pray for Publick Peace" in St Paul’s Cathedral.

St Benet’s was one of the 86 parish churches destroyed in the Great Fire of London, and it was not selected to be rebuilt when the 1670 Act of Parliament became law. The parish was united to that of St Stephen Walbrook...
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OCTOBER
6
2016

 

Moss Hall Crescent, N12
Moss Hall Crescent was built on land of a house called Moss Hall. The Moss Hall estate begun to be sold piecemeal after its sale in 1833. Moss Hall Crescent arrived in the 1860s. Moss Hall was demolished in 1927.
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OCTOBER
4
2016

 

Plough Inn
The Plough at Kingsbury Green was established in 1748. One in nine houses in 18th century Kingsbury was an inn, with the Plough being one of them.

During the 19th and early 20th centuries Kingsbury, a picturesquely rural district a short distance from London, attracted many walkers and cyclists, and the Plough Inn, with its attractive gardens, was once the headquarters of thirteen cycling clubs. It was at the Plough, too, that four Frenchmen and their three performing bears used to stay.

It was rebuilt in 1932 and resited to the west, later known as the Carlton Lounge.
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OCTOBER
2
2016

 

RAF Bomber Command Memorial
The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial is a memorial commemorating the crews of RAF Bomber Command who embarked on missions during the Second World War. The controversy over the tactics employed by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War meant that an official memorial to the aircrews had been delayed for many years. Despite describing bombers as "the means of victory" in 1940, British prime minister Winston Churchill did not mention Bomber Command in his speech at the end of the war.

An appeal was made for £5.6 million to build the memorial, and funding came from donations made by the public, as well as substantial amounts from Lord Ashcroft and businessmen John Caudwell and Richard Desmond. Robin Gibb, the singer, became a key figure behind the appeal, working alongside Jim Dooley to raise funds and have the memorial built.

Liam O’Connor designed the memorial, built of Portland stone, which features a bronze 2.7 metre sculpture of seven aircrew, designed by the sculptor Philip Jackson to look as though they have just returned from a bombing mission and left their aircraft.

Alumi...
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