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Website · Euston · NW6 · Contributed by Scott Hatton
MARCH
16
2017



The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
There are now over 23 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - use the Google Map control to change to a particular decade.The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

JULY
12
2018

 

Hasmonean High School
Hasmonean High School is a secondary school and sixth form with academy status for pupils from Orthodox Jewish families. The school was founded by the late Rabbi Dr Solomon Schonfeld (1912–1984) as Hasmonean Grammar School. Dr Schonfeld had rescued thousands of Jews from the Holocaust and pioneered Jewish day school education. Dr Schonfeld saw that the area had high numbers of Orthodox Jews but did not have a religious school to cater for them. Jewish law discourages mingling of the sexes when possible, especially when they are unmarried, so two separate schools needed to be set up, one for boys and one for girls.

The boys’ school became a voluntary aided Local Authority School in 1957. In September 1975, the girls moved to the present purpose-built Page Street site in Mill Hill. In 1984, voluntary aided status was extended to the girls’ school, and the two sections joined as one.

The total school capacity is 1494.
»read full article


JULY
11
2018

 

Silk Stream
Silk Stream is just over 4 kilometres long and lies entirely within the current London Borough of Barnet. The name is believed to derive from Sulh or Sulc, the Old English for plough or furrow.

The Silk Stream winds from the area near to Edgware Hospital and flows into the Welsh Harp. Silk Stream is a tributary of the River Brent. Its own main tributary - Burnt Oak Brook - runs for about 1.5 kilometres from near the M1 motorway and meets the Silk Stream at Burnt Oak. It has several other tributaries including Edgware Brook, the Edgwarebury Brook and Deans Brook.
»read full article


JULY
10
2018

 

Sunny Hill Park
Sunny Hill Park is a 22 hectare park, situated within the angle formed by the A1 and the A41. Sunnyhill Fields was an area of Church Farm, very popular as a site for viewing the planes at the adjacent Hendon Aerodrome.

In 1921 Hendon Council - the local authority - purchased 16 acres for a park, which opened in 1922, and in 1929 it was enlarged when further land was acquired.

An area in the south-east corner was formerly part of St Mary’s Churchyard, an important archaeological site with evidence of Roman and Anglo-Saxon occupation.

It is a hilly site about 900 metres long and 400 metres at its widest. The park still has hedgerows showing former field boundaries and mature trees. Together with the neighbouring Hendon Churchyard, it is a Site of Local Importance for Nature Conservation.

»read full article


JULY
9
2018

 

Magpie Alley, EC4Y
Magpie Alley marks the position occupied by the dorter (dormitory) of the Friary of the Blessed Virgin of Mount Carmel, commonly called the Whitefriars Monastery After the dissolution of the monasteries the whole of this area became infested with thieves and all sorts of law breakers. They came here claiming sanctuary from the jurisdiction of the City, a liberty enjoyed by the friars before them.

It seems that, along with many other taverns, the Magpie was flourishing in Whitefriars Street during the mid-18th century. The food dished up by the landlord was so poor that the place earned the title of the ‘maggot pie’. Naturally, later landlords were overjoyed that the corruption process had been at work and along the way it had been changed to the Magpie.

Over the years the layout of Magpie Alley and its neighbours seems to have become just a little confused. At one time the Alley left Whitefriars Street approximately opposite to the Harrow public house, but that access has now been stopped. Access from the main street is now via Brittons Court. Complications are further deepened through the obliteration of Geor...
»more


JULY
8
2018

 

Abbots Gardens, N2
Abbots Gardens is a circular road with an entrance onto East End Road. From 1683 until 1700 Richard Cromwell - son of Oliver Cromwell - lodged in the house of Thomas Pengelly, thought to be located where Abbots Gardens are today. This later became named Cromwell Hall.

During the war a V2 Rocket landed in Abbots Gardens.
»read full article


JULY
7
2018

 

College Yard, NW6
College Yard is a small alleyway off of Winchester Avenue, NW6. The yard dates from the first decade of the twentieth century.
»read full article


JULY
6
2018

 

Alperton Street, W10
Alperton Street is the first alphabetically of the named streets of the Queen's Park Estate in W10. The Queen's Park estate was built between 1874 and 1900 by the ‘Artisans and Labourers' General Dwellings Company.

The architecture of the 2000 homes is Gothic style with distinctive brickwork adorned with pinnacles and turrets along the main avenues. The estate still retains the 'six avenues' and originally, the streets were named A to P.

Over time the streets were given full names such as Alperton, Barfett, Caird Street and so on. The lettered streets represented some person or place connected with the company. Droop, for example, was one of the directors, and Alperton was the location of the company’s brickworks.
»read full article


JULY
5
2018

 

Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability
The Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability is located in London Borough of Wandsworth. The Royal Hospital is an independent medical charity that provides rehabilitation and long term care to people with complex neurological disabilities caused by damage to the brain or other parts of the nervous system. This damage is often caused by traffic accidents and progressive neurological conditions such as Huntington’s disease and multiple sclerosis. It is one of the 200 largest UK charitable organisations ranked by annual expenditure.

The Hospital was established in July 1854 at a meeting held at the Mansion House, chaired by the Lord Mayor of London. The hospital’s founder, Andrew Reed, had a record as a practical philanthropist, having previously set up four other charities, and Charles Dickens, the celebrated author, was one of the first high-profile figures to show his support by helping Reed raise funds for it.

The RHN was originally known as the Hospital for Incurables. It was based in a converted workhouse in Carshalton, Surrey,...
»more


JULY
4
2018

 

Garrett Lane, SW18
Garratt Lane connects Wandsworth High Street to Tooting Broadway and is approximately 4 kilometres long. Garratt Lane has mixed usage along its length. In the north it contains newly developed stores including a large single-storey shopping mall with parking above. The stretch between Allfarthing Lane and Burntwood Lane is mainly diverse shophouses including a few professional services. The southern portion is mainly residential, although around Summertown there are a few light industries and the Wimbledon Stadium.

The southernmost part of Garratt Lane is unusual in that two parallel streets exchanged names. The original Garratt Lane was a narrower street than Garratt Terrace, which was the main connection to Tooting Broadway. Many people mistakenly called it Garratt Lane, so it was agreed to exchange the names.

The south-east end of Garratt Lane, running from the junction with Fountain Road and Upper Tooting Road was previously called Defoe Road.

Most large public houses have survived along Garratt Lane, including The Old Sergeant and the Lea...
»more


JULY
3
2018

 

Ashcroft Technology Academy
Ashcroft Technology Academy is a state secondary school within the English academy programme. It accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. The school also offers further education for students aged 16–18 (academic years 12 and 13) in their Sixth Form. The academy underwent a multi-million pounds refurbishment programme which was completed in Summer 2010. This included a purpose built sixth-form and an Autism Resource Centre. The total school capacity is 1300.

ADT College was established in 1991 as a City Technology College, funded by donations from various organisations including ADT Security Services (whose owner at the time was Baron Michael Ashcroft), Unisys, British Gas and Young’s (who sponsored the schools "music bunker"). In 2007, the school was converted into an academy and renamed Ashcroft Technology Academy after its main private benefactor. Preceding this period the Building was the site of Mayfield School, an all-girl’s comprehensive
»read full article


JULY
2
2018

 

Putney High School
Putney High School is an independent girls school. It admits students from the ages 4–18. Founded in 1893 it is a member of the Girls’ Day School Trust, a union of 26 schools with 19,500 students and 3500 staff.

Formerly, there were three school houses Austen, Bronte and Eliot, named after well-known female authors, all of whom felt that their sex gave them a disadvantage and used pseudonyms when writing. George Eliot lived for a time in Holly Lodge, Southfields, a house within walking distance of the Putney High School site.

As of September 2013, the school uses an updated system of four houses, Ferrier, Stark, Hepburn and Burton, named after influential women all of whom were nominated by the students (Kathleen Ferrier, Freya Stark, Audrey Hepburn and Beryl Burton).

The school is situated on Putney Hill and the total school capacity is 988. There are no nursery classes.
»read full article


JULY
1
2018

 

Cressida Road, N19
Cressida Road partially lies along the line of an old footpath. The local Vestry announced, in the Times of 4 April 1891, replace an ancient footpath with a road. Cressida Road was completed by the end of 1892. The stretch of Gresley Road running between Cheverton and Whitehall Park was added to it by the LCC.
»read full article


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