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The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Cock Lane, EC1A
Cock Lane is a small street leading from Giltspur Street in the east to Snow Hill in the west. In the mediaeval period, it was known as Cokkes Lane and was the site of legal brothels. It is famous as the site of the house (No. 25) where the supposed Cock Lane ghost manifested itself in 1762, and as being the place where the writer John Bunyan, who wrote England’s first best-seller, died from a fever in 1688.

The junction of Giltspur Street and Cock Lane was known as Pye Corner, famous as marking the furthest extent of the Great Fire of London: commemorated by the Golden Boy of Pye Corner. This effigy was originally built into the front of a public house called The Fortune of War which used to occupy the site but was pulled down in 1910.

Read the Cock Lane entry on the Wikipedia...

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In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Citations and sources

Gillian Bebbington's 1972 work on street name derivations
The free encyclopedia

Links and further reading

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Featured articles

SEPTEMBER
30
2018

 

Alfred Mews, WC1E
Alfred Mews is situated off Tottenham Court Road, running behind the gardens of North Crescent. It was built at the same time as Alfred Place and North Crescent, for which it would be the Mews.

Odell’s Livery Stables was here by 1819 and in 1841 its occupants were those of a typical mews: carman, wheelwright, carpenter, coach and harness maker, livery stables.

By 1901 the prestigious furniture makers Hewetson, Milner & Thexton, Ltd. was in the Mews. They resisted the estate’s attempts to extend Alfred Place through their property but eventually were forced to move to premises at 209–212 Tottenham Court Road at a much higher rent, going bankrupt shortly afterwards in 1907.

The Mews buildings were all demolished and replaced by twentieth-century non-residential buildings and it is now mainly a service entrance for Heal’s.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
29
2018

 

Argyle Square, WC1H
Argyle Square is one of the streets of the Battle Bridge Estate. Argyle Square is situated between St. Chad’s Street (formerly Derby Street) and Argyle Street (formerly Manchester Street) which bounds the estate on the south.

The Battle Bridge field originally laid both sides of Gray’s Inn Road, sharing its name with the name usually applied to this part of London prior to the erection here of the memorial to King George IV in 1830, when the area became known as King’s Cross.

The development of the New Road (Euston Road) in the middle of the eighteenth century cut across the 18-acre part of the field west of Gray’s Inn Road, leaving most of it south of the new road.

This field was owned by a William Brock in 1800 and continued to be used for gardens and meadows.

In the early 1820s, when a remaining 16½ acres was purchased by Thomas Dunstan, William Robinson, and William Flanders. 15¼ acres were south of Euston Road and the remainder on the north side was eventually sold to b...
»more


SEPTEMBER
28
2018

 

Belgrove Street, WC1H
Belgrove Street, formerly Belgrave Street, leads south from Euston Road. Building was begun at the Euston Road end in 1834, when the first four houses were entered in the local rate book as due for rating. By 1839 there were seventeen houses. Daw’s map of 1868 (on which it is still spelled "Belgrave Street") indicates that this was its full complement, much of its length being absorbed by the back and front gardens of Hamilton Place (as the large houses facing the Euston Road were then called).

Of the original houses only Nos. 1 to 8 on the west side remain.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
27
2018

 

Grafton Way, WC1E
Grafton Way was formerly Grafton Street. Grafton Way runs east from Cleveland Street and crosses Whitfield Street and Tottenham Court Road to Gower Street. The part west of Tottenham Court Road was the first to be built in 1777, The eastern section was formerly known as Grafton Street and that west of the square as Upper Grafton Street. The section between Tottenham Court Road and Gower Street was a later development and was known as Grafton Street East.

58 Grafton Way (formerly 27 Grafton Street) was occupied by General Francisco de Miranda from 1803 to 1810, when he returned to Venezuela to lead the rebellion against the Spanish government.

»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2018

 

St James the Less
St James the Less is an Anglican church built by George Edmund Street in the Gothic Revival style. St James the Less was built in 1858–61. A grade I listed building, it has been described as "one of the finest Gothic Revival churches anywhere". The church was constructed predominately in brick with embellishments from other types of stone. Its most prominent external feature is its free-standing Italian-style tower, while its interior incorporates design themes which Street observed in medieval Gothic buildings in continental Europe.

St James the Less is now embedded in the centre of the Lillington Gardens estate, which was built around the church in three phases between 1964–72. The estate replaced a 12-acre area of dilapidated stucco-fronted houses with a dense low-rise series of residential buildings, constructed with dark red brick cladding interspersed with concrete bands.

The designers, Darbourne & Darke, set out specifically to complement the church and to avoid the use of precast concrete cladding, contemporary at the time, because they fe...
»more


SEPTEMBER
25
2018

 

Ashley Lane, NW4
Ashley Lane is divided into an official road and a track which is part of a nature reserve. The lane is over 500 years old, and was an important medieval road. Cardinal Wolsey travelled along it on his final journey to York in 1530. The southern part is a made-up road of housing. Crossing north over the A1, it finally becomes a bridleway which runs between Hendon Golf Course and Hendon Cemetery. The lane is the continuation of the route to Oakhampton Road.

The northern section is a one hectare Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Grade II. The lane has retained its ancient hedgerows, which have developed into narrow belts of woodland. The main trees are Pedunculate oak and ash, together with some wild service-trees, and the hedge bottom flora include ramsons and bluebells.

A small stream, a tributary of Dollis Brook, crosses the lane.


»read full article


SEPTEMBER
24
2018

 

Ashurst Road, N12
Ashurst Road was built by the British Land Company. West of Friern Barnet Lane and north of Woodhouse Road the White House estate of 55 acres of Frederick Crisp was acquired in 1908 by the British Land Co.

By 1911 Ashurst Road, Petworth Road, Bramber Road, Warnham Road and Buxted Road had been laid out between Woodhouse Road and Friern Park and the first two had been built up.

Lewes Road was later inserted and Horsham Road was constructed across the grounds of Brook House.


»read full article


SEPTEMBER
23
2018

 

Beethoven Street, W10
Beethoven Street is a street in the Queen’s Park Estate. The original streets of the Queen’s Park Estate were given names A Street, B Street, C street etc. up to P Street. They were eventually given real names but one of the distinguishing features of the Estate are these sequential streets.

The north-east corner of the Estate was acquired in 1874 by the United Land Company.

Four streets were eventually laid out - Beethoven, Mozart, Herries, and Lancefield Streets.

The terraced houses were tightly packed: a few, facing Kilburn Lane, were to be worth £500 and the rest £300. Less than half of the plots, towards the northern end, had been numbered by 1883 but Beethoven and Mozart Streets had been built up by 1886.

Both poor and comfortable households existed when surveyed in 1899 in Beethoven, Herries, and Lancefield Streets.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
22
2018

 

Dollis Farm
Dollis Farm was on the west side of Holders Hill Road near the junction which is now Holders Hill Circus. Two roads ran north of Hendon, Ashley Lane (which now runs through the back of Hendon Golf Course) and Holders Hill Road. Much of the land was held by All Souls College in 1597.

Dollis Farm was situated close to where Holders Circus is today on the western side of Holders Hill Road. Jeremy Bentham used the farm as a retreat and rented rooms there from 1788 onwards.

The farm existed until the death of the last farmer, Thomas Whiting, in 1930.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2018

 

Garston
Garston is a suburb of Watford in Hertfordshire, located between the North Orbital Road (A405) and Watford’s border with Three Rivers. In an undated charter, probably of the thirteenth century, Nicholas son of John de Garston gave to John de Westwick and Ellen his wife a messuage and land at Garston. By the middle of the fifteenth century it had come into the possession of William Halle of Shillington, ’a good and benevolent man’.

During the 1850s, a number of properties were constructed around the junction between Horseshoe Lane and Cart Path, including the Church of All Saints, which dates from 1853. By the end of the nineteenth century, the settlement at Garston included the Church, an infant school, post office and the Three Horseshoes Public House.

In the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries further piecemeal development occurred on Horseshoe Lane and Cart Path. As Watford expanded northwards during the mid to late twentieth century, the existing settlement was partially subsumed within the newly constructed suburban housing estates.

The Building Researc...
»more


SEPTEMBER
20
2018

 

Arkley Windmill
Barnet Gate Mill or Arkley Windmill is a grade II* listed tower mill at Barnet Gate. Barnet Gate Mill was built in 1823. A claim that it was built during the Napoleonic Wars (c.1800) has not been substantiated. Although steam had been added in 1895, it was working by wind until 1918, latterly on two sails. The mill was restored in 1930. A new cap, fantail and gallery around the cap being made. The work was done by Thomas Hunt, the Soham millwright. In a further restoration in 1985, the missing pair of sails was replaced.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
18
2018

 

Admiral Duncan
The Admiral Duncan is well-known as one of Soho’s oldest gay pubs. It is named after Admiral Adam Duncan, who defeated the Dutch fleet at the Battle of Camperdown in 1797.

The Admiral Duncan has been trading since at least 1832. In June of that year, Dennis Collins, a wooden-legged, Irish ex-sailor living there was charged with high treason for throwing stones at King William IV at Ascot Racecourse. Collins was convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered, as the medieval punishment for high treason was then still in effect. However, his sentence was quickly commuted to life imprisonment. and he was subsequently transported to Australia. In December 1881, a customer received eight years penal servitude for various offences in connection with his ejection from the Admiral Duncan public house by keeper William Gordon.

On the evening of 30 April 1999, the Admiral Duncan was the scene of a nail bomb explosion which killed three people and wounded around 70. The bomb was the third to be planted in a one-man camp...
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SEPTEMBER
17
2018

 

Coathouse Farm
Coathouse Farm was the seat of the Peacock family. Coathouse - also known as Courthouse and Court House) - was situated at the north-west corner of Nether Street. It was assessed with fourteen hearths in 1664.

The farm house was partly demolished in 1927 and completly by 1936. The buildings were used by the Sandwell Ladies College.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
16
2018

 

Black Boy
The Black Boy public house stood on the Mile End Road. This pub was present by 1750; in 1856, listed as 9½ Mile End Road but at 179 Mile End Road in 1910. It was re-built in its present form in 1904 at the time of the construction of Stepney Green Station. The pub closed in c.1996 and the building now houses two fast food outlets (2006). It also traded as the Farmers Arms in the 1940s and as Fifth Avenue in its final years.

From 137 Mile End Road to the Black Boy Tavern, the houses are all pulled down in 1902 for the construction of the Whitechapel & Bow Railway.

Until 1902, the pub had an alleyway connecting it to the mysterious XX Place.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
15
2018

 

Deepdale Close, N11
Deepdale Close forms part of the Halliwick Park estate built by Barratts. When laid out, there were 11 houses in Deepdale Close.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
14
2018

 

Hampstead Garden Suburb
Hampstead Garden Suburb is a suburb, north of Hampstead, west of Highgate, and east of Golders Green. It is an example of early twentieth-century domestic architecture and town planning located in the London Borough of Barnet in northwest London. The master plan was prepared by Barry Parker and Sir Raymond Unwin.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
13
2018

 

Yeading
Yeading was one of the final suburbs to develop in westernmost London. The first land grant including Yeading was made by Offa in 790 to Æthelhard, Archbishop of Canterbury: in the place called on linga Haese [Hayes] and Geddinges [Yeading] around the stream called Fiscesburna (Crane or Yeading Brook).

Anglo-Saxon settlement in Yeading therefore seems probable, but the history of Yeading in subsequent centuries is not as clear as that of Hayes. Such details as the names of many Yeading manor holders remain unknown.

Yeading Dock was one of many docks built along the Grand Union Canal in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The main industry in Hayes and Yeading at this time was brickmaking, and the canal provided a reliable way of transporting larger numbers of bricks. Yeading’s brickworkers could be known to keep pigs as a second source of income. A bourgeois writer, one Elizabeth Hunt, wrote in 1861 that in Yeading dirt, ignorance and darkness reign supreme. In 1874, however, one James Thorne wrote that t...
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SEPTEMBER
12
2018

 

The Angel
The Angel Public House is grade II listed and dates from the 1830s. The building potentially includes material from a 17th century building formerly occupying the site. The Angel name has been recorded since that date.

In the 15th century an inn and rest house for travellers called The Salutation was kept at or near this site by monks from Bermondsey Priory. In 1682 The Angel was in a position diagonally opposite its present site, and was referred to by the famous diarist Samuel Pepys as "the famous Angel." The former Redriffe stairs used to be located immediately to its west.

By the 19th century, The Angel marked the commencement of a continuous built-up river frontage running to the east. Gaps in the frontage are evident providing access to the river via stairs.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
11
2018

 

Albemarle Street, W1S
Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk. Albemarle Street and the surrounding area was built by a syndicate of developers.

In 1684, the syndicate had purchased and demolished a Piccadilly mansion called Clarendon House from Christopher Monck, the near-bankrupt 2nd Duke of Albemarle. It was sold for £20,000, some 20% less than the duke had paid for it nine years before. Clarendon House backed onto fields and on them, the syndicate also built Old Bond Street, Dover Street and Stafford Street.

Albemarle Street has associations with Lord Byron and Oscar Wilde.

The Royal Institution was established at 21 Albemarle Street in 1799. Because of the Institution’s popularity through its scientific lectures, Albemarle Street became London’s first one-way street to avoid the traffic problems which had attended a series of lectures by Humphry Davy.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
10
2018

 

Barlby Road, W10
Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10 Barlby Road started its life as Edinburgh Road, a small cul-de-sac street with a school, running from Ladbroke Grove, beside the railway lines towards Old Oak Common.

Today the start of Edinburgh Road can still be seen in Barlby Road, but it used to be of cobbles and tarmac whereas now it is part of a small concreted car park for the occupants of houses.

In 1902, five acres of land were quickly bought for the Clement Talbot Motor Works in North Kensington. It was established in 1903 as the UK’s first purpose-built car factory. The workshops, built in brick with the latest saw-tooth roof line liberally glazed to provide the maximum natural light, were equipped with the most modern machine tools from every part of the world.

Edinburgh Road was extended to provide access to the south front of the works and it was almost immediately renamed Barlby Road.

Barlby Road was then extended to connect Ladbroke Grove with North Pole Road and Scrubs Lane, providing a through road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
9
2018

 

Alma Grove, SE1
Alma Grove was formerly Alma Road, and before that Tenter Ground Lane. A map from 1850-51 confirms that at this time the local area remained largely undeveloped with the exception of Alma Grove (then Tenter Ground Lane) and Southwark Park Road (then Blue Anchor Road).

The name Alma Grove records both the date of its development and famous military victories of the Crimean War still fresh in the public’s mind at that time.


»read full article


SEPTEMBER
8
2018

 

Amelia Street, SE17
Amelia Street originally consisted of late 19th century tenement blocks built by James Pullen, a local builder, between 1886 and 1901. Amelia Street predated most of the streets in the area being of eighteenth century origin.

James Pullen & Son, who advertised themselves as “lead burners and manufacturers of the patent cast lead D trap & plumbers’, tinmen’s and blow pipe solder”, had a builder’s yard in Amelia Street and traded from premises at 73 Penton Place, Kennington Park Road.

Pullen acquired property in the area and the first block was erected in 1886 at the Penton Place end of Amelia Street. This was surrounded by controversy, as by-law approval for the development had been refused by the Metropolitan Board of Works.

The first two blocks were condemned upon completion but that they were allowed to remain when Mr Pullen agreed to change the design.

During the 1980s the buildings between Manor Place and the south side of Amelia Street were demolished by the council using their housing improvement powers. The demolition of the rest of the Pul...
»more


SEPTEMBER
7
2018

 

Great Windmill Street, W1F
Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre. The street took its name from a windmill on the site which was recorded 1585 and demolished during the 1690s. In a parliamentary survey of 1658 the mill was described as "well fitted with Staves and other materials".

The area was developed around 1665 but the building was speculative and of poor quality; this led to a royal proclamation in 1671 that prohibited unlicensed development in "Windmill Fields, Dog Fields and Soho". Later that year, Thomas Panton, one of the original speculators, was granted a licence to continue his scheme with the condition that it was supervised and directed by Sir Christopher Wren who was the Surveyor General of the King’s Works. By 1682, maps show that both sides of the street were developed along their whole length.

In 1767 the Scottish anatomist and physician William Hunter FRS built a large house at number 16 after demolishing an earlier large dwelling. Hunter’s house incorporated a large library, a museum and an anat...
»more


SEPTEMBER
6
2018

 

Eynsham Drive, SE2
Eynsham Drive dates from the late 1950s with the construction of the Abbey Wood Estate. A parade of shops was constructed in 1966 with Abbey Wood Library helping to form a focus for the new estate.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
5
2018

 

Albany Street, NW1
Albany Street runs from Marylebone Road to Gloucester Gate following the east side of Regent’s Park. The street was laid out during the 1820s, and takes its name from Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, the younger brother of King George IV.

The freeholds of the west side of the street are owned by the Crown Estate, as part of Regent’s Park. The southern part of the east side of the street is part of the Regent’s Park Estate.

The building numbering system has odd numbers on the west side, and even numbers on the east. At the Marylebone Road end is the Holy Trinity Church. Next is "The White House", formerly a set of luxury flats, and now a hotel renamed "The Melia White House". Both stand on traffic islands to themselves. Numbers 31 and 33 are Grade I listed buildings, designed by John Nash. Between 35 and 55 there is an inserted street. This area was occupied by a huge construction called "The Colosseum" designed by Decimus Burton. It was demolished in 1875, and replaced by houses called "Colosseum Terrace" in 1878.

At...
»more


SEPTEMBER
4
2018

 

Barfett Street, W10
Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 Barfett Street forms part of the Queens Park Estate, built by the Artisans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company.

The Artisans Company’s first project was Shaftesbury Park, a development of 1,200 two-storey houses covering 42.5 acres built in 1872 on the site of a former pig farm in Battersea. The success of Shaftesbury Park led to the construction of Queen’s Park, built in 1874 on a far more ambitious scale on 76 acres of land to the west of London, adjacent to the railway line out of Paddington (Queen’s Park station opened in 1879), purchased from All Souls College, Oxford.

The architecture of that estate of some 2000 small houses is distinctively Gothic-revival, with polychrome brickwork, pinnacles and turrets along the bigger roads.

Barfett Street was originally called "B Street" since the Estate had street names of numbers and letters: Avenues 1-6 and streets A-P.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
3
2018

 

Mortimer Place, NW6
Mortimer Place can be found in Kilburn, NW6. A.A.Milne was born in Kilburn in 1882. The house where he was living was destroyed in the war when a V1 fell in the vicinity and the site is now occupied by Remsted House, part of the Mortimer Estate, at the junction of Mortimer Place and Kilburn Priory.

In 1948 the L.C.C. began clearing the area between Greville Road and Mortimer Place and Crescent, which it replaced with the Mortimer Crescent estate, eight smallscale, brick blocks of flats, which were opened c. 1955.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
2
2018

 

Adler Street, E1
Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road. The street was named after Nathan Marcus Adler, Chief Rabbi of Great Britain 1845–1890. Originally it was called Union Street.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
1
2018

 

Abingdon Road, N3
Abingdon Road runs north east from Long Lane, roughly parallel with the North Circular Road. Now a development of typical Finchley suburbia, Abingdon Road was laid out in a narrow field backed by a footpath which ran from Bow Lane to Tarling Road past a gravel pit in Victorian times.

Tudor Primary School, now at the end of the road, was built between Abingdon Road and the footpath, cutting it off.
»read full article


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