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Website · Charing Cross · NW6 · Contributed by Scott Hatton
MARCH
16
2017


The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
There are now over 23 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - use the Google Map control to change to a particular decade.The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

OCTOBER
31
2018

 

Acorn Street, E1
Acorn Street, Bishopsgate, was named from an old tavern sign. The writer Dodsley said that it was named after the" Acorn," which stood on the site of the King’s Arms Tavern, Bishopsgate. An acorn was one of the badges of the Arundel family but there is no evidence that they had any connection with the neighbourhood.

Adams Court near Old Broad Street, probably bears the name of a former owner of the property. Sir Thomas Adams was Lord Mayor in 1645.

Once called both Acorn Court and Acorn Alley it originally ran west from Bishopsgate to Skinner Street, appearing in John Strype’s Survey of London (1598).

It seems to have been rebuilt in 1799.

Acorn Street was finally demolished to make way for an expansion to Liverpool Street station.
»read full article


OCTOBER
30
2018

 

Aldermanbury, EC2V
Aldermanbury is the Saxon name for ’Eldermen’ (elder statesmen) and ’bury’ (house or home). Aldermanbury originally ran north-south, between Lad Lane in the south and Love Lane in the north and parallel between Wood Street in the west and Basinghall Street in the east. The street dates back to the time of Edward the Confessor. Its current length is curtailed compared with former times.

The London historian Stow believed that the first Guildhall stood on the east side of Aldermanbury; thus the street received its name as being adjacent to the bury or court of the aldermen of the city (Harben). At the time of Stow’s Survey, however, the Guildhall had been relocated to the corner of Basinghall Street and Cateaton Street.

The Reverend Thomas White (c.1550 - 1624), Vicar of St Dunstan-in-the-West, Fleet Street, left £3000 in his will “for the acquisition of a house for the making of a College of Ministers, Rectors (Readers) and Curates within the City of London and the suburbs of the same." Sion College hall was built at the corner of London Wa...
»more


OCTOBER
29
2018

 

Lind Road, SM1
Lind Road is named for Swedish opera singer, Johanna Maria Lind. Born in Stockholm in 1820, Johanna Maria Lind ’the Swedish Nightingale’ settled in Surrey from 1855.

Hans Christian Andersen wrote several of his stories with her in mind. There’s also a theory he wrote the Snow Queen about her after she failed to return his affections.

Lind first performed in London in 1847. In honour of her Surrey connection, there is Lind Road and a pub called the Nightingale on Carshalton Road. No recording of Lind’s singing exists.

After 1865, the lord of the manor Thomas Alcock developed the streets of the ’New Town., east of the High Street, but left it to an assortment of builders to put up cramped terraced housing here for the working classes. Shops and several pubs lined Lind Road.
»read full article


OCTOBER
28
2018

 

Manoel Road, TW2
Manoel Road is named after the last king of Portugal. Manoel became king in 1908. His mother had been born in Twickenham. He was 18 years old when he came to the throne after assassins had killed his father and older brother. He was deposed two and a half years later in a Republican revolution.

Fulwell Lodge became home to ex-King Manoel II of Portugal who lived here after 1913 with his German wife Princess Victoria Augusta of Hohenzolern. After his death in 1932 the estate was purchased and developed for housing.

Nearby streets include Portugal Gardens and Lisbon Avenue.
»read full article


OCTOBER
27
2018

 

Pratt Street, NW1
Pratt Street was named for Charles Pratt, 1st Earl of Camden. Charles Pratt was the Lord Chancellor between 1766 and 1770 and had been Attorney General.

The development of Camden Town started with the ’Kentish Town Act’ of 1788. This allowed Charles Pratt and his heirs to lay out streets on his property. There were building leases for 1400 houses.

Pratt Street named after the Earl, was started in 1791.
»read full article


OCTOBER
26
2018

 

Mornington Cresent, NW1
Mornington Cresent was named after Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington. Garret Wesley was a talented composer from County Meath in Ireland who in 1760 was created Earl of Mornington and Viscount Wellesley. The future victor at the Battle of Waterloo - Arthur Wellesley who became the Duke of Wellington - was Garret Wesley’s third son.

He also had a daughter Anne who married local landowner Henry FitzRoy in 1790. Owning this patch of Camden, Henry named Mornington Crescent, Mornington Place, Mornington Terrace and Mornington Street after the title of his father-in-law.

Mornington Crescent was begun in 1821 although the northernmost part of the crescent was called Southampton Street until 1864.

The Crescent became quite an artists’ colony in the latter part of the nineteenth century with Spencer Gore, Frederick Pickersgill and Walter Sickert residing there.

The Mornington Crescent Gardens were designed for the enjoyment and leisure of the residents but were built over in 1928 when the Carreras cigarette factory was built.
»read full article


OCTOBER
25
2018

 

Dagenham Heathway
Dagenham Heathway station was opened in 1932. In 1932 the electrified District line of the London Underground was extended to Upminster through Dagenham with stations opened as Dagenham and Heathway and today called Dagenham East and Dagenham Heathway.

The station was constructed and initially operated by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway with services provided by the District line from the outset. The station changed to its present name in 1949.

Services on the London Tilbury & Southend line at Dagenham East were withdrawn in 1962.
»read full article


OCTOBER
24
2018

 

Savile Row, W1S
Savile Row is known worldwide for gentlemen’s tailoring. This street which is the centre for men’s bespoke clothing is named after a woman, Dorothy Savile.

Burlington House was inherited in 1704 by Dorothy’s future husband, Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork.

Dorothy Savile, an accomplished artist, married Boyle in 1721.

Savile Row - originally Savile Street - was named after the maiden name of the Duke’s now wife and situated behind Burlington House as part of the Burlington Estate. It was developed between 1731 and 1735.

Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.

Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself.
»read full article


OCTOBER
23
2018

 

Aberdeen Road, N5
Aberdeen Road connects Aberdeen Park with Sotheby Road. In a directory of 1870 and in the 1871 Census, this was called Aberdeen Park Road. In 1888 it became Aberdeen Road. Along it was Aberdeen Terrace.
»read full article


OCTOBER
22
2018

 

Leighton Road, NW5
The route of Leighton Road followed an original path from the Assembly House Inn on Kentish Town Road to Maiden Lane. In 1804, the pathway was described as having a stile at the eastern end and a bowling green on its north side (on the site of the current 37 Leighton Road).

The owner of the land surrounding the path was Joshua Prole Torriano. Naming the path ’Evans Place’, Torriano sold off small freehold plots to individuals.

In 1816, Evans Place was renamed as Gloucester Place. The plots were just enough for large individual houses, or small groups developed at this same time causing a diverse built environment.

Leighton Road assumed its current name in the 1860s when it was linked to Torriano Avenue.

37 Leighton Road was one of the first new houses to be completed - in 1824. It was originally one of a pair but its twin was demolished when Lady Margaret Road was laid out mid century.
»read full article


OCTOBER
21
2018

 

St Michael Paternoster Royal
St Michael Paternoster Royal is a church in the City of London. The original building, which was first recorded in the 13th century, was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The church was rebuilt under the aegis of Sir Christopher Wren. However St Michael’s was severely damaged during the London Blitz in the Second World War. It was restored between 1966 and 1968.

In 1423 Richard "Dick" Whittington, the fabled Lord Mayor of London, was buried within its precincts; although the tomb is now lost.
»read full article


OCTOBER
20
2018

 

Quality Court, WC2A
Quality Court is a courtyard, built around 1700. A wonderful labyrinth of alleys and courts used to straggle between Chancery Lane and Fetter Lane, but sadly, of these dozens of minute burrows, only a handful now remain. Quality Court, as we might devise from its name, was one of the more ‘classy’ addresses in the district. It was built about 1700, although not specifically with the view of attracting the upper crust of society to its confines, but with its stylish houses and spacious accommodation that is just what happened. When the properties went up for sale they came in droves, but, of course, the dwellings were few and so the speculators made their offers to the highest bidders.

John Strype, writing up his survey in 1720 says this is ‘a very handsome, large and airy Court, lately built, with very handsome brick houses…’ It was then called New Court but resulting from the life style of the new inhabitants was commonly known as Quality Court – much in the same way as we now refer to selected roads wher...
»more


OCTOBER
19
2018

 

Olympia
Olympia is an exhibition centre, event space and conference centre in West Kensington, London, England. The venue is home to a range of international trade and consumer exhibitions, conferences and events.

Olympia first opened its doors to the public on 26 December 1886.

Read the Olympia (London) entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


OCTOBER
18
2018

 

Old Barge House Alley, SE1
This is an article about Old Barge House Alley. Before the streets of London were constructed of durable materials they were so pot-holed and ridged that travelling along them could often be a hazardous business. Apart from this, the movement of traffic about the City was thoroughly disorganised – farmers driving herds of cattle to market were a constant obstacle and accidents were a frequent occurrence. Although the problem was not so much volume of traffic, as it is today, travelling only a short distance in the chaos took a long time. The Thames offered an escapement route and those who could afford to hire a sculler and oarsman travelled in relative comfort and at reasonable speed. In those days all the major activities were centred reasonably close to the River and only a short walk away from the innumerable jetties along the waterside. Royalty and noble lords built their houses close to the Thames with easy access to private stairs where they boarded their luxurious barges.

The Monarch owned barges for differ...
»more


OCTOBER
17
2018

 

Blithfield Street, W8
Blithfield Street is a quiet cul-de-sac running north from Stratford Road. In 1868, Thomas Hussey was given permission to build on the site of the bowling green behind the Devonshire Arms public house. He built this as a cul-de-sac off Stratford Road in 1869. There were 17 houses in all, and it catered for the poorest members of the community.

The houses are three-storey terraced Victorian houses painted in many different colours and nowadays the street is tree-lined. Some of the houses have exterior shutters and first floor balconettes which gives the street a particularly attractive ‘villagey’ feel.
»read full article


OCTOBER
16
2018

 

Star Street, E1
Star Street was, for a while, Planet Street. Star Street was a little over half a mile along Commercial Road and led southwards. It was originally designated Dock Street and then Planet Street, but became Star Street in June 1865. In December 1891, it reverted to being Planet Street again. Finally it disappeared in the 1960s.

Star Place was a short cul-de-sac of just six houses in the 1880s - a small alley running east/west at the bottom of Star Street.

After taking Star Street as representative of the parish of St. George in the East and describing its squalor at length in his study published as Ragged London in 1861, John Hollingshead says of nearby Devonshire Street that it was "... as full of hunger, dirt and social degradation as Star Street..."

The Census taken on 6 February 1861 notes that "... in Star Street there are living in 123 houses about 1500 persons, including 300 children, many without shoes or stockings..." The average rent per room for a week was is 9d with the low...
»more


OCTOBER
15
2018

 

Watney Street, E1
Watney Street is the location for a famed East End street market. Watney Street began its life as Duke Street, sometime in the Napoleanic period. The southern end of Watney Street was then called Charles Street.

In 1902, Watney Market, which ran along the length of Watney Street, had over 100 shops and stalls. By 1928 the number of stalls had more than doubled.

By the 1960s Watney Market was in decline: people were moving away, and beginning to shop elsewhere. By 1979 there were only eighteen stalls left.

68 Watney Street housed an early branch of Sainsbury’s. In 1881 John James Sainsbury took over his brother-in-law Edward Staples’ shop selling cheese and salt bacon to dockers and lightermen, many of them Irish (Mary Ann Staples, whose family had built up a chain of shops, married John James Sainsbury in 1869).

In 1956 the ’Watney Streeters’ gang – most of them dockers - were involved in brawls with the Kray twins.
»read full article


OCTOBER
14
2018

 

Aberdeen Park, N5
Aberdeen Park was first laid out between 1853 and 1854. It was named after George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen (1784-1860), First Lord of the Treasury (Prime Minister) from December 1852 to January 1855.

In 1806 most of the site was simply fields, Ten Acres and Nineteen Acres owned by Francis Masseres and occupied by Samuel Palmer. In 1848 they were called Great Field and Little Field, over fourteen acres, the property of George Morrice.

A smaller part of Aberdeen Park was owned in 1806 by a Mr Mallett and occupied by a Captain Agnew with a ’house, offices and pleasure grounds’, the same portion in 1848 being owned by John Foster.

After 1877, there was agricultural land - the Aberdeen Park Nursery - occupied as a horticultural nursery in 1904 by W. Clinton and then Frederick James Clinton was there as a nurseryman until 1935. Aberdeen Court is now on the site.

In December 1934 the Islington & Holloway Press described Aberdeen Park as being owned by Canon W. D....
»more


OCTOBER
13
2018

 

Seaforth Crescent, N5
Seaforth Crescent appeared on the map in 1982. The architects of the buildings there were Darbourne & Darke.
»read full article


OCTOBER
12
2018

 

The Angel
The Angel was a public house in Webber Street. The Angel was on the site presently occupied by 27-31 Webber Street. Next door was the Marshall Building.

The first licencee is recorded as early as 1797. The street, and thus the address of the pub, went through a series of renumbering. It was listed as 1 Webber Street in 1862, the address was 31 Webber Street by 1944, and finally as 71 Webber Street.

By the 1970s, both the Angel and Marshall Building had been replaced by warehousing. 21 Webber Street had become a print works and 35 Valentine Place a large joinery works.
»read full article


OCTOBER
11
2018

 

Aden Road, EN3
Aden Road was first mentioned in 1893 when plans for six houses were submitted It was named for the then British "Aden Settlement" in what is now Yemen.
»read full article


OCTOBER
10
2018

 

Treaty Street, N1
Treaty Street was called London Street until 1938. First recorded in 1835, Copenhagen Primary School, situated on London Street, was opened in 1887 as Buckingham Street school. It was renamed Copenhagen Council School in 1938.

Before the Second World War, the street ran down to the Regents Canal and was lined with terraced houses. The streetscape has somewhat changed since then with the 1948 York Way Court being the major feature.
»read full article


OCTOBER
9
2018

 

William Barefoot Drive, SE9
William Barefoot Drive is named for prominent local politician who was Mayor of Woolwich three times. William Barefoot (1872-1941) was a notable politician in south-east London during the early part of the 20th century.
»read full article


OCTOBER
8
2018

 

William Morris Gallery
The William Morris Gallery is the only public museum devoted to English Arts and Crafts designer and early socialist William Morris. The William Morris Gallery, opened by Prime Minister Clement Attlee in 1950, is located at Walthamstow in Morris’s family home from 1848 to 1856, the former Water House, a substantial Grade II* listed Georgian dwelling of about 1750.

Water House was set in its own extensive grounds (now Lloyd Park). The gallery underwent major redevelopment and reopened in August 2012; in 2013 it won the national prize for Museum of the Year.

The gallery’s collections illustrate Morris’s life, work and influence. They include printed, woven and embroidered fabrics, rugs, carpets, wallpapers, furniture, stained glass and painted tiles designed by Morris himself and by Edward Burne-Jones, Philip Webb, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Ford Madox Brown, and others who together founded the firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company in 1861.

The gallery also holds a substantial collection of furniture, textiles, ceramics and glass by Morris’s followe...
»more


OCTOBER
7
2018

 

William Morris Close, E17
William Morris Close is named after the famous artist. William Morris spent his childhood at the nearby Water House, which is now the William Morris Gallery.
»read full article


OCTOBER
6
2018

 

Wilton Cresent, SW1X
Wilton Crescent is named after Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton. Egerton was the scond son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster - Wilton Crescent forms part of the Grosvenor estate.
»read full article


OCTOBER
5
2018

 

Woffington Close, KT1
Woffington Close is named for stage performer Peg Woffington. Peg Woffington was an 18th-century actress who performed in Teddington, near to where the road is located.

She is buried in Teddington parish church.
»read full article


OCTOBER
4
2018

 

Wren Road, SE5
Wren Road is named for Sir Christopher Wren. The road was built on the grounds of a former house said to have been occupied by Wren.
»read full article


OCTOBER
3
2018

 

Woodford Green
Woodford Green, historically part of Essex, it was absorbed into Greater London in 1965. Part of the suburb of Woodford in northeast London, Woodford Green lies within the London Borough of Redbridge – though part of the western green (known as the Woodford Side) falls under the Borough of Waltham Forest.

Woodford Green is surrounded by forests, lakes, country parks and open spaces. The A104 bisects Woodford Green, forming its high street.


»read full article


OCTOBER
2
2018

 

East Crescent, N11
East Crescent was previously an unadopted road. In 1946, the local council recommended that the name East Crescent was assigned to the private street constructed for users of temporary houses.
»read full article


OCTOBER
1
2018

 

Ruislip
Ruislip is a London Underground station in Ruislip in north London. The station is on the Uxbridge branch of both the Metropolitan line and Piccadilly line, between Ruislip Manor and Ickenham stations. Ruislip was formerly a parish in the county of Middlesex covering the neighbouring areas of Eastcote, Northwood, Ruislip Manor and South Ruislip. The parish appears in the Domesday Book, and some of the earliest settlements still exist today, designated as local heritage sites. The parish church, St Martin’s, dates back to the 13th century and remains in use.

The buildings at the northern end of Ruislip High Street form the core of the original village square and are now Grade II listed. It originally featured a central water pump which was moved out of the road in the 1970s as a result of increased traffic.

The Metropolitan Railway (Harrow and Uxbridge Railway) constructed the line between Harrow-on-the-Hill and Uxbridge and commenced services on 4 July 1904 with, initially, Ruislip being the only intermediate stop. At first, services were operated by steam trains, but track electrification was completed in the subsequent months and electric trains...
»more


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