Carlton Vale, NW6

Road in/near Maida Vale, existing between 1861 and now

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Road · Maida Vale · NW6 ·
JANUARY
6
2017

Carlton Vale runs from the Edgware Road to Kilburn Lane.


In 1850 the Reverend Edward Stuart sold 47 acres to a consortium of five developers, of whom the largest was James Bailey. They laid out roads and sewers and divided the site among themselves, subletting to smaller firms who built a few houses each.

Carlton Vale was originally called Carlton Road and was laid out over the former fields of Kilburn Bridge Farm.

Several of the contractors aimed high with their early efforts but the isolated, muddy location - the vale was the flood plain of the River Westbourne - failed to attract buyers and the estate remained incomplete for several decades.

A new type of building, in red or multi-coloured brick, was used from the 1860s. It was soon to spread over the remaining unbuilt-upon land.

Carlton Vale was extensively rebuilt after World War Two bombing.

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Maida Vale

Maida Vale took its name from a public house named after John Stuart, Count of Maida, which opened on the Edgware Road soon after the Battle of Maida, 1806.

The area was developed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in the early 19th century as middle class housing. The main building started in the mid 19th century and from the 1860s red brick was used. The first mansion blocks were completed in 1897.

Maida Vale nowadays makes up most of the W9 postal district - the southern part of Maida Vale at the junction of Paddington Basin with Regent's Canal, with many houseboats, is known as Little Venice. The area to the south-west of Maida Vale, at the western end of Elgin Avenue, was historically known as Maida Hill.

Maida Vale tube station was opened on 6 June 1915, on the Bakerloo Line.
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