Hopefield Avenue, NW6

Road is in an area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before

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Road · Queen's Park · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
1
2000


Street/road in London NW6



ADD A STORY TO HOPEFIELD AVENUE
VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Queen's Park

Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen's Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen's Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen's Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen's Park 'proper' formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen's Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen's Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett's wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen's Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queens Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen's Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen's Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen's Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR. As of December 2013, no mainline services calling at the station and the Watford service has been transferred to London Overground.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
1879 Royal Agricultural Society Show:   Washout summers are not only a modern phenomenon
1950 to 1963 at 3 woodnook road, sw16:   house with gas mantles, kitchen range, bread and milk delivered by horse drawn vans.
6 East Row, W10: Scott Hatton:   Scott Hatton lived here in 1960
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed):   The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Al-Sadiq and Al-Zahra Schools:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 16. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Aldershot Manor Park:   
Ark Brunel Primary Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Ark Franklin Primary Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Beethoven Street School:   Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate.
Black Park Country Park:   
Blackheath:   
Boxhill:   
Bricket Wood Sports and Country Club:   
Brondesbury:   Brondesbury was originally "Brand’s manor", a small hamlet in Middlesex.
Brondesbury College:   Brondesbury College for Boys is a selective independent school for boys.
Brondesbury College London:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Selective (grammar).
Brondesbury Park:   Brondesbury Park is an affluent suburb and electoral ward of the London Borough of Brent.
Bulstrode Park:   
Canterbury Park:   
Capel Manor Environmental Centre for Schools:   
Castle Park:   
Cherry Tree Park:   
Chipperfield Common:   
Christ Church CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Clandon Park:   
Clarence Park:   
Clayton Arms:   A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Cock Marsh:   
Crown Court Brookman Park:   
Custom:   
Deer Park:   
Dorothy Gardner Centre:   Local authority nursery school (Nursery) which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 5.
Earlsfields:   Between Thorplands on the east and Shoot Up Hill on the west lay several fields called Earlsfields.
Early Years Service at Holmfield House:   This is a children’s centre.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance:   Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Epping Forest Public Open Space:   
Eton Dorney:   
Grays Beach Riverside Park:   
Guards Club Park:   
Ingress Park:   
Islamia Primary School:   Islamia Primary School is a voluntary aided primary, Islamic faith school.
Islamia School for Girls’:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16.
Jack of Newbury:   The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Jarman Park:   
Kensal House:   There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Kensal Town:   Soapsuds Island
Kilburn:   Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).
Kilburn Lane Farm:   A farm existed in Kilburn Lane until the 1860s, by which time it had been disrupted by the railway line.
Lads of the Village:   One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Lancefield Coachworks:   Lancefield Coachworks was a builder of bespoke bodies for expensive car chassis always introducing sporting elements into designs.
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority:   
Lee Valley White Water Centre:   
Lily Hill Park:   
Lower Green:   
Lower Park:   
M25 Junction 30:   Junction 30 (J30) of the M25 motorway is the junction to the north of the Dartford River Crossing.
Malorees Junior School:   Foundation school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 7 and 11.
Mary Paterson Nursery School:   Local authority nursery school (Nursery) which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 5.
Marylebone Boys’ School:   Free schools (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Mertsham:   Merstham is a largely residential dispersed village in four sections in the borough of Reigate and Banstead, and lying near to the M23 and M25 motorways.
Middle Row Bus Garage:   Middle Row Bus Garage was situated on the corner of Conlan Street and Middle Row, W10.
Middle Row School:   Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Moneyhole Lane Park:   
North West Locality Hub Lead -Queen’s Park Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
North West London Jewish Day School:   Academy converter (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Northfleet Urban Country Park:   
Northlands Park:   
Odney Club:   
Portobello Arms:   The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Preston Recreation Ground:   
Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee School:   Community special school which accepts students between the ages of 4 and 19.
Queen’s Park Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Queen's Park:   Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.
Queens Park Estate:   The part of Queen's Park which is in the W10 postcode and City of Westminster, is known as the Queens Park Estate.
Queen’s Park:   
Queen’s Park Library:   Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
River Gardens:   
Runnymede:   
Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Salusbury Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Selby Square, W10:   Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate
Shrub End Playing Field:   
Silwood Park:   
St Albans Centurians Rugby League Club:   
St Luke’s CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 5 and 11.
St Thomas’ CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Stoke Park:   
Tesco Sports Ground:   
The Brocas:   
The Earl Derby:   The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road.
The Flora:   The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters:   A lost pub of London W10
The Home Park:   
The Prince of Wales (Chilled Eskimo):   A pub in Kensal Town
The Rough Park:   
The Royal Pavillion:   
The Rye:   
The St Marylebone Church of England Bridge School:   Free schools special which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 19.
The Underground Map:   The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.
The Whites:   
Theobold Park:   
Tidemills:   
Titness Park:   
Town Mead:   
Upper Park:   
Weald Country Park:   
Wedlake Street Baths:   In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
West End Sidings Estate:   The West End Sidings Estate takes its name from the former West End railway sidings running along the Midland Railway.
West End Sports Ground:   
West Kilburn:   West Kilburn is the westernmost slice of London W9, centered around Fernhead Road.
Wilberforce Primary:   Academy sponsor led (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Wombwell Park:   


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Adair Road junction with Southam Street (1932):   A wet day in London W10.
Adair Road, W10:   Adair Road junction with Appleford Road, March 1964
Adair Road, W10:   Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910):   2015
Golborne Road bridge (1960s):   We think that this photo dates from the late 1960s, according to fashions and car registrations.
Harrow Road (1920s):   Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson's the chemist (1906):   Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900):   This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge:   Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lothrop Street (1907):   2015
Rural Brondesbury (1894):   This photo says that it depicts the field where Mapesbury, Dartmouth, Teignmouth and Exeter Roads are now situated.
Western Dwellings from below (1960s):   This photo was taken from the bottom of Southern Row steps.
William Miller's Yard:   William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Adair Road, W10 · Adair Tower, W10 · Adela Street, W10 · Albert Road, NW6 · Alderson Street, W10 · Allington Road, NW6 · Allington Road, W10 · Alperton Street, W10 · Appleford House, W10 · Appleford Road, W10 · Ashmore Road, W9 · Athelstan Gardens, NW6 · Barfett Street, W10 · Barlow Road, NW6 · Beethoven Street, W10 · Bembridge Close, NW6 · Bosworth Road, W10 · Bradiston Road, W9 · Bravington Road, W9 · Briar Walk, W10 · Brooklands Court, NW6 · Brooksville Avenue, NW6 · Bruce Close, W10 · Bruckner Street, W10 · Brunel Mews, W10 · Bunny Lane, TW13 · Caird Street, W10 · Callcott Road, NW6 · Carlisle Road, NW6 · Cavendish Close, NW6 · Cavendish Place, NW2 · Cavendish Place, W1 · Cavendish Road, NW6 · Chatsworth Road, NW2 · Chatsworth Road, NW6 · Chevening Road, NW6 · Christchurch Avenue, NW2 · Christchurch Avenue, NW6 · Christchurch Court, NW6 · Claremont Road, W10 · Claremont Road, W9 · Clarence Road, NW6 · College Parade, NW6 · College Yard, NW6 · Conlan Street, W10 · Coomassie Road, W9 · Coverdale Road, NW2 · Coverdale Road, NW6 · Creighton Road, NW6 · Dart Street, W10 · Dartmouth Road, NW2 · Denholme Road, W9 · Donaldson Road, NW6 · Douglas Road, NW6 · Dowland Street, W10 · Drakes Courtyard, NW6 · Drayford Close, W9 · Droop Street, W10 · Dudley Road, NW6 · Dunmore Road, NW6 · Dunster Gardens, NW6 · Dyne Road, NW6 · East Row, W10 · Edenham Way, W10 · Embrook Street, W10 · Enbrook Street, W10 · Esher Common NT, KT22 · Esmond Road, NW6 · Exeter Parade, NW2 · Exeter Road, NW2 · Exeter Road, NW6 · Farrant Street, W10 · Fermoy Road, W9 · Fernhead Road, W9 · Fifth Avenue, W10 · First Avenue, W10 · Forest Close, NW6 · Fourth Avenue, W10 · Galton Street, W10 · Garlinge Road, NW2 · Gladstone Mews, NW6 · Golborne Gardens, W10 · Great Western Road, W9 · Great Western Studios, W9 · Harrow Road, W10 · Hartland Road, NW6 · Harvist Road, NW10 · Harvist Road, NW6 · Hawthorn Walk, W10 · Hazlewood Crescent, W10 · Hazlewood Tower, W10 · Heather Walk, W10 · Herries Street, W10 · Honiton Road, NW6 · Hopefield Avenue, NW6 · Hormead Road, W9 · Horton Road, SL3 · Huxley Street, W10 · Ilbert Street, W10 · James Collins Close, W9 · James House Appleford Road, W10 · John Fearon Walk, W10 · Kempe Road, NW10 · Kempe Road, NW6 · Kensal Road, W10 · Keslake Road, NW6 · Keslake Road, NW6 · Kilburn Lane, NW6 · Kilburn Lane, W10 · Kilburn Lane, W9 · Kilravock Street, W10 · Kimberley Road, NW6 · Kingscroft Road, NW2 · Kingsley Road, NW6 · Kingswood Avenue, NW6 · Lancefield Street, W10 · Landau House, NW2 · Lavie Mews, W10 · Linburn House, NW6 · Lincoln Mews, NW6 · Lonsdale Road, NW6 · Lothrop Street, W10 · Loveridge Mews, NW6 · Lynton Road, NW6 · Malvern Place, NW6 · Manchester Drive, W10 · Mapesbury Road, NW2 · Mapesbury Road, NW6 · Maple Walk, W10 · Marban Road, W9 · Marne Street, W10 · Maxilla Walk, W10 · Middle Row, W10 · Milman Road, NW6 · Montrose Avenue, NW6 · Mowbray Road, NW2 · Mowbray Road, NW6 · Mozart Street, W10 · Nutbourne Street, W10 · Oliphant Street, W10 · Onslow Close, W10 · Park Mews, W10 · Parry Road, W10 · Peach Road, W10 · Pennymore Walk, W9 · Peploe Road, NW6 · Petrie Close, NW2 · Plympton Avenue, NW6 · Plympton Road, NW6 · Porlock Street, W10 · Portnall Road, W9 · Post Office Way, SW95 · Radnor Road, NW6 · Raymede Street, W10 · Riverton Close, W9 · Ronan Walk, W10 · Rupert Road, NW6 · Saint Cuthberts Road, NW2 · Salusbury Road, NW6 · Second Avenue, W10 · Severn Avenue, W10 · Shoot Up Hill, NW2 · Shoot-up Hill, NW2 · Sixth Avenue, W10 · Southam House Adair Road, W10 · Southam Street, W10 · Southern Row, W10 · St Cuthbert?s Road, NW2 · St Laurence Close, NW6 · St Laurences Close, NW6 · Stansbury Square, W10 · Station Terrace, NW10 · Streatley Road, NW6 · Summerfield Avenue, NW6 · Summit Court, NW2 · Sycamore Walk, W10 · Symphony Mews, W10 · Teignmouth Road, NW2 · Tennyson Road, NW6 · The Arches, NW6 · The Avenue, NW6 · The Quadrant, NW6 · The Ridge, RH8 · Third Avenue, W10 · Tolhurst Drive, W10 · Tollbridge Close, W10 · Torbay Road, NW6 · Trellick Tower · Treverton Street, W10 · Wayne Kirkum Way, NW6 · Wedlake Street, W10 · West Row, W10 · Western Dwellings · Western Mews, W9 · Willesden Lane, NW6 · William Dunbar House, NW6 · William Saville House, NW6 · Winchester Avenue, NW6 · Windermere Avenue, NW6 · Woodfield Place, W9 ·
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Links

Queen’s Park
Facebook Page
Kilburn
Facebook Page
The Notting Hill & North Kensington Photo Archive
Facebook group
Born in W10
Facebook group
Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.
Time Out
Listings magazine

Maps


Land ownership in Willesden (1823) FREE DOWNLOAD
Map of land ownership in the Willesden area in 1823
City of London Corporation

John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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