Mutrix Road, NW6

Road in Kilburn

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Road · Kilburn · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
1
2000


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VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Go to Kilburn

Kilburn

Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).

Kilburn High Road originated as an ancient trackway, part of a Celtic route between the settlements now known as Canterbury and St Albans. Under Roman rule, the route was paved. In Anglo-Saxon times the road became known as Watling Street.

Kilburn grew up on the banks of a stream which has been known variously as Cuneburna, Kelebourne and Cyebourne, which flows from Hampstead down through Hyde Park and into the River Thames. It is suggested the name means either Royal River or Cattle River ('Bourne' being an Anglo-Saxon word for 'river'). That river is known today as the Westbourne.

The name Kilburn was first recorded in 1134 as Cuneburna, referring to the priory which had been built on the site of the cell of a hermit known as Godwyn. Godwyn had built his hermitage by the Kilburn river during the reign of Henry I, and both his hermitage and the priory took their name from the river.

Kilburn Priory was a small community of nuns, probably Augustinian canonesses. It was founded in 1134 at the Kilburn river crossing on Watling Street (the modern-day junction of Kilburn High Road and Belsize Road). Kilburn Priory's position on Watling Street meant that it became a popular resting point for pilgrims heading for the shrines at St Albans and Willesden. The Priory was dissolved in 1536-37 by Henry VIII, and nothing remains of it today. The priory lands included a mansion and a hostium (a guesthouse), which may have been the origin of the Red Lion pub, thought to have been founded in 1444. Opposite, the Bell Inn was opened around 1600, on the site of the old mansion.

The fashion for taking 'medicinal waters' in the 18th century came to Kilburn when a well of chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) was discovered near the Bell Inn in 1714. In an attempt to compete with the nearby Hampstead Well, gardens and a 'great room' were opened to promote the well, and its waters were promoted in journals of the day as cure for 'stomach ailments'.

In the 19th century the wells declined, but the Kilburn Wells remained popular as a tea garden. The Bell was demolished and rebuilt in 1863. The Kilburn stretch of Watling Street, now called Edgware Road and Kilburn High Road, was gradually built up with inns and farm houses. Kilburn did not attract any significant building until around 1819 in the area near St John's Wood.

Much of the area was developed in the last decades of the 19th century by Solomon Barnett, who named many of the streets after places in the West Country (e.g. Torbay) or after popular poets of the day (e.g. Tennyson) in honour of his wife.

There are three railway stations on Kilburn High Road: Kilburn tube station (Jubilee line) at its northern end and a little to the south Brondesbury station (London Overground). Approximately a mile further south is Kilburn High Road station (also London Overground). The name of Ian Dury's first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, refers to this road, as does the Flogging Molly song, "Kilburn High Road" and the Shack song, "Kilburn High Road".

Kilburn tube station opened as Kilburn and Brondesbury on 24 November 1879, as part of the Metropolitan and St. John's Wood Railway run by the Metropolitan Railway. Following the merger of the Metropolitan Railway into London Transport in 1933, it then became part of the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line on 20 November 1939, at which time the station was extensively rebuilt. The station was renamed to its current name on 25 September 1950. It was transferred to the Jubilee line on its opening, on 1 May 1979.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Cannon Stream:   The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Gaumont State:   The Gaumont State Cinema is a Grade II listed Art Deco theatre. While it still exists, it is no longer a cinema.
Kilburn Bridge:   Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge Farm:   Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn Grange Park:   Kilburn Grange Park is a 3.2 hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn High Road:   What was Watling Street in earlier times, became Edgware Road and finally Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn Park:   Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm:   Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Kilburn Wells:   Kilburn Wells. a medicinal spring, existed between 1714 and the 1860s.
Kingsgate Community Centre:   Kingsgate Community Association was set up in 1982 by a group of local people who wished to establish a community centre in what was then a derelict building.
Oaklands Hall:   On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
Red Lion:   The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
The Grange:   The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Kilburn High Road (1880s):   This photo was taken on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Eresby Road, which has since disappeared.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Abbey Road, NW6 · Abbots Place, NW6 · Acol Road, NW6 · Addison Court, NW6 · Algernon Road, NW6 · Alpha Place, NW6 · Birchington Road, NW6 · Bransdale Close, NW6 · Brondesbury Mews, NW6 · Buckley Road, NW6 · Cambridge Avenue, NW6 · Cambridge Court, NW6 · Cathedral Walk, NW6 · Cleve Road, NW6 · Colas Mews, NW6 · Cotleigh Road, NW6 · Coventry Close, NW6 · Daynor House, NW6 · Douglas Court, NW6 · Dunster Gardens, NW6 · Dynham Road, NW6 · Gascony Avenue, NW6 · Goldsmith Place, NW6 · Gorefield Place, NW6 · Grange Place, NW6 · Grangeway, NW6 · Greville Mews, NW6 · Greville Place, NW6 · Greville Place, W9 · Greville Road, NW6 · Hemstal Road, NW6 · Hermit Place, NW6 · Kilburn Bridge, NW6 · Kilburn High Road, NW6 · Kilburn Place, NW6 · Kilburn Priory, NW6 · Kilburn Square, NW6 · Kilburn Vale, NW6 · Kings Gardens, NW6 · Kingsgate Place, NW6 · Kingsgate Road, NW6 · Linburn House, NW6 · Linstead Street, NW6 · Loveridge Road, NW6 · Mallard Close, NW6 · Manor Mews, NW6 · Maple Mews, NW6 · Mazenod Avenue, NW6 · Messina Avenue, NW6 · Mortimer Crescent, NW6 · Mortimer Crescent, NW6 · Mortimer Place, NW6 · Mutrix Road, NW6 · Netherwood Street, NW6 · Oxford Road, NW6 · Palmerston Road, NW6 · Plaza Parade, NW6 · Priory Road, NW6 · Priory Terrace, NW6 · Quex Mews, NW6 · Quex Road, NW6 · Regents Plaza, NW6 · Smyrna Road, NW6 · Springfield Lane, NW6 · Springfield Walk, NW6 · St Marys Mews, NW6 · Swiss Terrace, NW6 · The Arches, NW6 · The Terrace, NW6 · Victoria Mews, NW6 · Wavel Mews, NW6 · Webheath, NW6 · Wells Court, NW6 · Woodchurch Road, NW6 ·


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What is Mutrix Road, NW6 like as a place to live?

TRANSPORTATION
Good
DAILY LIFE
Good
SAFETY
Average
HEALTH
Average
SPORTS AND LEISURE
Good
ENTERTAINMENT
Good
DEMOGRAPHICS
Good
Data from placeilive.com/

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Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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