Harrow Road, W10

Road in/near Kensal Town, existing until now

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Road · Kensal Town · W10 · Contributed by The Underground Map
December
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2017

Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.

Harrow Road is an ancient route which runs from Paddington in a northwesterly direction towards Harrow. It is also the name given to the immediate surrounding area of Queens Park and Kensal Green, straddling the NW10, W10 and W9 postcodes. With minor deviations in the 19th and 20th centuries, the route remains otherwise unaltered. There are dozens of other existing roads throughout the United Kingdom using the same name which do not lead to or from Harrow but merely use the name of the town or, in some cases, a person of that name.

Before urbanisation the entire road was known as the "Harrow Road" but, as various local authorities came into existence and imposed independent numbering schemes and more localised descriptions on the parts of the road within their respective boundaries, the principal name was replaced in a number of places along its course.

Starting at the junction of Harrow Road and Edgware Road at Paddington Green, Harrow Road (A404) passes through Maida Hill, Queens Park and Kensal Green. This stretch runs partially alongside and underneath the Westway urban motorway.

At the junction of Ladbroke Grove the road leaves the City of Westminster and forms the boundary between the London Borough of Brent and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (except for the length between Kensal Green station and the entrance to Kensal Green Cemetery where it is entirely within Brent) until reaching Scrubs Lane where it becomes entirely within the borough of Brent.

It becomes High Street (Harlesden), Craven Park, Hillside and Brentfield.

Passing over the River Brent which formed the pre-1965 boundary between the former Municipal Borough of Willesden and the Metropolitan Borough of Wembley (both now defunct) and from which the modern borough takes its name, Harrow Road enters Wembley and passes through an area formerly known as Tokyngton.

Still numbered the A404, Harrow Road briefly becomes High Road (Wembley) and then Harrow Road (Sudbury), renumbered to be the A4005 at the junction with Watford Road (which continues to be the A404).

It passes from the London Borough of Brent into the London Borough of Harrow at the Sudbury Court Drive junction and for a while it is Sudbury Hill, London Road (Harrow) and finally Roxeth Hill High Street. The road finishes at the town centre on Harrow Hill.

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ADD A STORY TO HARROW ROAD
VIEW THE KENSAL TOWN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE KENSAL TOWN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE KENSAL TOWN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE KENSAL TOWN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE KENSAL TOWN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Kensal Town

Soapsuds Island

Kensal New Town was built between the Grand Central Canal (which opened in 1801) and the Great Western Railway line (opening in 1837) in the 1840s.

Single-storey cottages with gardens suitable for drying clothes were the first buildings and Kensal Road, Middle Row, West Row, East Row and Southern Row all appeared between 1841 and 1851. The rows of cottages quickly degenerated into a slum, mainly due to overcrowding, industrialisation and pollution.

The area was dominated by the Western Gas Company and Kensal Cemetery, which provided work but did little to improve the environment. Women were primarily involved in laundry work giving the area its nickname of ‘Soapsuds Island’.

The area was isolated from the rest of London at a time when Portobello Lane (now Portobello Road) was a muddy track sometimes impassable in bad weather.

Cut off from the municipal authorities it was left to charities to attempt to alleviate the social and health problems.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the cottage laundry industry began to be replaced by larger mechanized concerns.

In 1902 Charles Booth described it as, “Just as full of children and poverty as was the old woman’s dwelling in the nursery rhyme.” By this date the area had been transferred to the newly formed Royal Borough of Kensington. When the Piggeries and Potteries in Notting Dale were finally cleared in the early 20th century most of the displaced residents moved north into Golborne ward and Kensal.

By 1923 in the Southam Street area 140 houses contained some 2500 inhabitants. A series of evocative photographs by Roger Mayne in the 1950s showed that little had changed. It was only from the 1960s that the overcrowded and dilapidated terraces were cleared and replaced by social housing including Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower.

OTHER LOCATIONS NEAR HERE
Adair Road junction with Southam Street (1932) · Adair Road · Adair Road · Adair Road · Adair Tower · Adela Street · Admiral Mews · Alderson Street · Alperton Street · Appleford Road · Ark Brunel Primary Academy · Athlone Gate · Bales College · Banister Road · Beethoven Street School · Beethoven Street · Bosworth Road · Branstone Street · Bruce Close · Caird Street · Chamberlayne Farm · Chilled Eskimo · Conlan Street · Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) · Corner of Rackham Street · Dissenters’ Chapel · Droop Street · Early Years Service at Holmfield House · East Row · Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance · Enbrook Street · Exmoor Street · Farrant Street · Galton Street · Gas Light and Coke Company · Golborne Road bridge (1960s) · Hazlewood Tower · Hewer Street · Hudson's the chemist (1906) · Huxley Street · Ilbert Street · James House Appleford Road · John Fearon Walk · Kensal Community Centre · Kensal House · Kensal House · Kensal Road · Kensal Town · Kilburn Lane · Kilravock Street · Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) · Ladbroke Grove looking north (1950) · Ladbroke Grove railway bridge · Lancefield Coachworks · Lavie Mews · Lionel Mews · Lothrop Street (1907) · Lothrop Street · Middle Row Bus Garage · Middle Row School · Middle Row · Oliphant Street · Peach Road · Porlock Street · Queen’s Park Primary School · Queens Park Estate · Queen’s Park Library · Rackham Street · Rackham Street · Rackham Street · Raymede Street · Ronan Walk · Saint John the Evangelist · Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary School · Selby Square · Southam House Adair Road · St Charles Square after bombing (1950) · St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) · St Martins Mission · St Thomas’ CofE Primary School · Stansbury Square · The Eagle · The Lloyd Williamson School · The Paradise · The St Marylebone Church of England Bridge School · The Victoria (1920s) · Tollbridge Close · Trellick Tower · Treverton Street · W36 · Wedlake Street Baths · Wedlake Street · West Row · Western Dwellings · Western Dwellings from below (1960s) · Wilberforce Primary · William Miller's Yard · Wornington Road ·
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Links

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Maps


Inner West London (1932) FREE DOWNLOAD
1930s map covering East Acton, Holland Park, Kensington, Notting Hill, Olympia, Shepherds Bush and Westbourne Park,
George Philip & Son, Ltd./London Geographical Society, 1932

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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