Beresford Square, SE18

Road in/near Woolwich Arsenal, existing between 1837 and now

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Road · Woolwich Arsenal · SE18 ·
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2018

Beresford Square dates from early 19th century and was named after the Anglo-Irish general William Beresford.

Beresford Square (c. 1890). Workers leaving the Royal Arsenal are walking past the elegantly designed public convenience.
Credit: Ideal Homes
William Beresford was Master-General of the Ordnance and Governor of the Royal Military Academy.

Beresford Square was the result of a series of clearances meaning that some of the buildings are older than the square.

The west side of Beresford Square, was known as the High Pavement. Land to its east was part of the Burrage Estate, named for its 14th-century owner, Bartholomew de Burghersh.

The Salutation Inn stood almost at the northern end of the High Pavement. It had a tea garden and may have had Woolwich’s first theatre, dating from before 1721. That garden later became Salutation Alley with about 20 timber cottages. It was adjudged a slum and cleared in the 1970s. In 1833 the Salutation pub moved to new premises next door.

An 1831 clearance formed a better entrance to the Royal Arsenal and its news gate became known as Beresford Gate, later the Royal Arsenal Gatehouse. In 1837 the square too was named after Beresford.

Most of the commercial buildings around the square were rebuilt in the final two decades of the 19th century.

Throughout the 20th century, Beresford Square remained the centre of Woolwich life.

In 1913, the Woolwich Arsenal Cinematograph Company started a cinema in a building between the Salutation pub and Holy Trinity Church. The cinema, later the Century Cinema was demolished after 1964, along with Holy Trinity, the Salutation Inn and other neighbouring buildings.

Woolwich Market had officially opened in September 1888. The market was open every day bar Sundays. As the market was often overcrowded, plans were presented for the widening of both Beresford Street and Plumstead Road, and by the 1970s, the pedestrianisation of the square.

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Beresford Square (c. 1890). Workers leaving the Royal Arsenal are walking past the elegantly designed public convenience.
Ideal Homes

VIEW THE WOOLWICH ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WOOLWICH ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
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VIEW THE WOOLWICH ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
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VIEW THE WOOLWICH ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE WOOLWICH ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

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South Essex and North Kent (1805)
Ordnance Survey First Series. The first completed map was of the county of Kent in 1801. The first use of the term Ordnance Survey in manuscript was in 1801, but it did not appear on an engraved map until 1810. William Mudge was the effective head from the start and actual head of the Survey from 1804 to 1820.
Reproduced from the 1805 Ordnance Survey map.

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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