Bridge Approach, NW1

Road in/near Chalk Farm, existing between 1855 and now

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Road · Chalk Farm · NW1 ·
August
21
2015

Bridge Approach was once a busy thoroughfare connecting Regents Park Road with the world.


Regents Park Road was a major east west route from central London to the east was very busy. To the north lay Bridge Street.

In the 1960s, two children were knocked down and killed at the railway bridge. As a result the bridge was closed to traffic and one of the five entry points into Primrose Hill was blocked to cars whilst still allowing pedestrian access. The road was renamed Bridge Approach.

Regents Park Road was no longer a through route. The massive decrease in traffic flows encouraged restaurants and shops to settle and form a more vibrant Primrose Hill. Although they have many attributes, the presence of busy through routes ultimately prevents the formation of a relaxed village neighbourhood which Primrose Hill has susequently become.

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Chalk Farm

Chalk Farm has nothing to do with chalk at all. Though there once was a farm...

Chalk Farm's name, deceptively rural, derives from the name of the village on its site, Chalcot. These days it absorbs the spread from Camden Town and has many lively pubs, live music venues, and restaurants. Within London it is best known as the site of The Roundhouse, a former circular railway engine shed which was subsequently converted for arts and performance use.

Chalk Farm station was opened on 22 June 1907 by the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR). Trains originally operated between Golders Green and Charing Cross tube station, with extensions to Edgware and Kennington in 1923 and 1926, respectively.
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