Bridge Approach, NW1

Road in Chalk Farm, existing between 1855 and now

 HOME  ARTICLE  MAP  FULLSCREEN  STREETS  RECENT  BLOG  HELP  CONTACT 
Click here to log in on Facebook Advanced
MAPPING:1750180018301860190019302017Fullscreen map
Road · Chalk Farm · NW1 · Contributed by The Underground Map
August
21
2015


Regents Park Road was a major east west route from central London to the east was very busy. To the north lay Bridge Street.

In the 1960s, two children were knocked down and killed at the railway bridge. As a result the bridge was closed to traffic and one of the five entry points into Primrose Hill was blocked to cars whilst still allowing pedestrian access. The road was renamed Bridge Approach.

Regents Park Road was no longer a through route. The massive decrease in traffic flows encouraged restaurants and shops to settle and form a more vibrant Primrose Hill. Although they have many attributes, the presence of busy through routes ultimately prevents the formation of a relaxed village neighbourhood which Primrose Hill has susequently become.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

VIEW THE CHALK FARM AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALK FARM AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALK FARM AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALK FARM AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALK FARM AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
 Upload an image
You can add an image to this location if you are logged into our Facebook app.
 Add new information to this location
You can add text to this location if you are logged into our Facebook app.
 
 Log on via Facebook
You can use a Facebook id to add material to this website.

Address not listed? Add it here...
Go to Belsize Park

Belsize Park

The Manor of Belsize dates back to 1317, with the name is derived from French bel assis meaning 'well situated'.

Belsize Manor was built by Daniel O'Neill for his wife, the Countess of Chesterfield, in the 17th century. Urbanisation took place largely between 1852 and 1878, by which time it extended to Haverstock Hill. After World War I, the construction of blocks of flats began, and now a great many of the larger houses are also converted into flats.

Belsize Park underground station was opened on 22 June 1907 by the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway as an intermediate station on its line from Charing Cross to Hampstead. It is served by three lifts and there are 219 steps. The station was designed by Leslie Green and has his familiar facade of ox-blood faience with four round arched windows. It remained largely untouched until the late 1980s when the lifts were replaced and a new ticketing system installed.

It was during the 1930s that Belsize Park contributed most to the artistic and intellectual life of Hampstead. Artists associated with the Mall studios included Dame Barbara Hepworth from 1927 to 1939, her first husband John Skeaping and second Ben Nicholson from 1931 to 1939, and Henry Moore, who lived at no. 11A Parkhill Road from 1929 to 1940. They were members of Unit One, a group of artists and architects founded in 1933 by Paul Nash (1889-1946), who lived at no. 3 Eldon Grove from 1936 to 1939. Sir Herbert Read, the poet and art critic, who lived in 1934-5 at the Mall studios, which he described as a 'nest of gentle artists', published the group's manifesto, a theory of modern style.

Another centre was no. 37 Belsize Park Gardens, meeting place of MARS, an architectural group, and home of Jack Pritchard, who founded Isokon, a firm making modern furniture designed by people like Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer, refugees who brought a European dimension to the abstract design movement in the arts. Others included Piet Mondrian, the Dutch painter, who stayed with the Pritchards before moving to no. 60 Parkhill Road (1938-41). Pritchard also commissioned Wells Coates in 1934 to build the Isokon or Lawn Road flats, partly to house artistic refugees, on a site which he owned. Built in concrete in a functional style, the flats came to be recognized as 'a milestone in the introduction of the modern idiom into London'.

In World War II, a large underground air-raid shelter was built here and its entrance can still be seen near the tube station at Downside Crescent. The area on Haverstock Hill north of Belsize Park underground station up to Hampstead Town Hall and including part of a primary school near the Royal Free Hospital was heavily bombed.

Belsize Park these days is a lively area with many restaurants, pubs and cafés along Haverstock Hill and also England's Lane.

Glossary: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 9, edited by C R Elrington.



LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Benevolent Institution for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Tailors:   The Benevolent Institution for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Journeymen was founded on 10 February 1837.
Chalk Farm:   Chalk Farm has nothing to do with chalk at all. Though there once was a farm...
Chalk Farm:   Chalk Farm was originally a farmhouse and later a tavern set in fields. But Chalk Farm has nothing to do with chalk at all.
Haverstock School:   Haverstock School (formerly Haverstock Comprehensive School), is a comprehensive school for students aged 11 to 18.
Queen’s Crescent Market:   Queen’s Crescent Market is one of London’s oldest street markets, and is still held every Thursday and Saturday.
The Load of Hay:   The Load of Hay was established by 1721.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Ainger Road, NW3 · Auden Place, NW1 · Baptist Gardens, NW5 · Belmont Street, NW1 · Berkley Grove, NW1 · Berkley Road, NW1 · Bridge Approach, NW1 · Camden Lock Place, NW1 · Camden Lock, NW1 · Castle Road, NW1 · Castlehaven Road, NW1 · Chalcot Road, NW1 · Chalk Farm Parade, NW3 · Chalk Farm Road, NW1 · Chamberlain Street, NW1 · Crogsland Road, NW1 · Dumpton Place, NW1 · East Yard, NW1 · Edis Street, NW1 · Egbert Street, NW1 · Erskine Road, NW3 · Eton College Road, NW3 · Eton Hall, NW3 · Eton Rise, NW3 · Eton Road, NW3 · Eton Villas, NW3 · Ferdinand Place, NW1 · Ferdinand Street, NW1 · Fitzroy Road, NW1 · Gloucester Avenue, NW1 · Hadley Street, NW1 · Harmood Street, NW1 · Hartland Road, NW1 · Haven Street, NW1 · Hawley Crescent, NW1 · Hawley Cresent, NW1 · Hawley Road, NW1 · Hillview, NW3 · James Cameron House, NW1 · Kent House, NW1 · Kentish Town Road, NW1 · Kingstown Street, NW1 · Leybourne Road, NW1 · Maitland Park Road, NW3 · Maitland Park Villas, NW3 · Manley Street, NW1 · Marsden Street, NW5 · Middle Yard, NW1 · Modbury Gardens, NW5 · Powlett Place, NW1 · Primrose Hill Studios, NW1 · Primrose Mews, NW1 · Prince of Wales Road, NW3 · Princess Road, NW1 · Provost Road, NW3 · Rhyl Street, NW5 · Sharpleshall Street, NW1 · St Georges Mews, NW1 · St Georges Terrace, NW1 · St Marks Crescent, NW1 · St Marks Cresent, NW1 · Steele?s Mews South, NW3 · Steele?s Road, NW3 · Stucley Place, NW1 · The Courtyard, NW1 · The Stables Market, NW1 · Torbay Street, NW1 · Water Lane, NW1 · Waterside Place, NW1 · West Yard, NW1 ·


USING THIS MATERIAL IN OTHER ARTICLES


COMMENTS

Print-friendly version of this page

What is Bridge Approach, NW1 like as a place to live?

TRANSPORTATION
Good
DAILY LIFE
Good
SAFETY
Average
HEALTH
Average
SPORTS AND LEISURE
Good
ENTERTAINMENT
Good
DEMOGRAPHICS
Good
Data from placeilive.com/

Links

Belsize Park
Facebook Page
Chalk Farm
Facebook Page
Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.
Time Out
Listings magazine

Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
1 


COPYRIGHT TERMS:
Unless a source is explicitedly stated, text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Articles may be a remixes of various Wikipedia articles plus work by the website authors - original Wikipedia source can generally be accessed under the same name as the main title. This does not affect its Creative Commons attribution.

Maps upon this website are in the public domain because they are mechanical scans of public domain originals, or – from the available evidence – are so similar to such a scan or photocopy that no copyright protection can be expected to arise. The originals themselves are in public domain for the following reason:
Public domain Maps used are in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighbouring rights.

This tag is designed for use where there may be a need to assert that any enhancements (eg brightness, contrast, colour-matching, sharpening) are in themselves insufficiently creative to generate a new copyright. It can be used where it is unknown whether any enhancements have been made, as well as when the enhancements are clear but insufficient. For usage, see Commons:When to use the PD-scan tag.