Victoria

Underground station, existing between 1862 and now

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Underground station · Victoria · SW1V ·
MAY
22
2013

The railways largely replaced the canals as a means of transport. Uniquely for a main line station, Victoria station was built on top of one.

Concourse at Victoria (Central) on a Summer Saturday in 1955
Credit: Ben Brooksbank
Before the railway arrived in 1862, this area - like the area immediately south of it - was known as Pimlico. The Grosvenor Canal ended in a large basin here.

Victoria station’s origins lie with the Great Exhibition of 1851, when a railway called the West End of London and Crystal Palace Railway came into existence, serving the site of the exhibition halls which had been transferred to Sydenham from Hyde Park. The terminus of that railway was at Stewarts Lane in Battersea on the south side of the river. In 1858 a joint enterprise was set up to take trains over the river: it was entitled the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway; and was a mile and a quarter in length. The railway was owned by four railway companies: the Great Western (GWR); London & North Western (LNWR); the London, Brighton and South Coast (LBSCR); and the London Chatham and Dover Railways (LCDR). It was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1858.

The station was built in two parts: those on the western side, opened in 1862, with six platforms, ten tracks and an hotel (the 300-bedroom Grosvenor) were occupied by the Brighton company; whilst adjacent, and in the same year, the Chatham company were to occupy a less imposing wooden-fronted building. The latter’s station had nine tracks and was shared by broad-gauge trains of the GWR, whose trains arrived from Southall via the West London Extension Joint Railway through Chelsea. The GWR remained part owner of the station until 1932, although its trains had long since ceased to use it. Each side of the station had its own entrance and a separate station master; a wall between the two sections effectively emphasised that fact.

At the start of the twentieth century both parts of the station were rebuilt. It now had a decent frontage and forecourt, but not as yet a unified existence. Work on the Brighton side was completed in 1908 and was carried out in red brick; the Grosvenor Hotel was rebuilt at the same time. The Chatham side, in a Edwardian style with baroque elements, designed by Alfred Bloomfield, was completed a year later. The two sections were eventually connected in 1924 by removing part of a screen wall, when the platforms were renumbered as an entity. The station was redeveloped internally in the 1980s, with the addition of shops within the concourse, and above the western platforms.

The station was now serving boat trains, and during WWI it became the hub of trains carrying soldiers to and from France, many of them wounded. After the war the Continental steamer traffic became concentrated there, including the most famous of those trains, the Golden Arrow. The area around the station also became a site for other other forms of transport: a bus station in the forecourt; a coach terminal to the south; and it is now the terminal for trains serving Gatwick Airport.

Victoria is also well-served by London underground. The sub-surface Circle and District Lines opened on December 24, 1868; and the Victoria Line line came to Victoria Station with the third phase of construction of the line - the station’s platforms were opened on March 7, 1969, six months after the Victoria line had started running in outer London.

xxx

Concourse at Victoria (Central) on a Summer Saturday in 1955
Ben Brooksbank

THE STREETS OF VICTORIA
Abbey Orchard Street, SW1P Abbey Orchard Street was the heart of a former slum area.
Allington Street, SW1E Allington Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Ambrosden Avenue, SW1P Ambrosden Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Arneway Street, SW1P Arneway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Artillery Place, SW1P Artillery Place is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Artillery Row, SW1P Artillery Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ashley Gardens, SW1P Ashley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ashley Place, SW1P Ashley Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Bloomberg Street, SW1V Bloomberg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bloomburg Street, SW1V Bloomburg Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Bressenden Place, SW1E Bressenden Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Brewers Green, SW1H Brewers Green is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Bridge Place, SW1V Bridge Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Buckingham Palace Road, SW1V Buckingham Palace Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Buckingham Place, SW1E Buckingham Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Cardinal Walk, SW1E Cardinal Walk is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Carey Place, SW1V Carey Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Carlisle Mansions, SW1P Carlisle Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Carlisle Place, SW1P Carlisle Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Castle Lane, SW1E Castle Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Catherine Place, SW1E Catherine Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Chadwick Street, SW1P Chadwick Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Coburg Close, SW1P Coburg Close is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Dean Bradley Street, SW1P George Granville Bradley was Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1881.
Douglas Street, SW1P Douglas Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
East Concourse, SW1V East Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Eaton Lane, SW1W Eaton Lane is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Eaton Row, SW1W Eaton Row is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Eccleston Bridge, SW1V Eccleston Bridge is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Eccleston Square Mews, SW1V Eccleston Square Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Eccleston Square, SW1V Eccleston Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Elverton Street, SW1P Elverton Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Emery Hill Street, SW1P Emery Hill Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Evelyn Mansions, SW1P Evelyn Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Francis Street, SW1P Francis Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Gillingham Row, SW1V This is a street in the SW1V postcode area
Gillingham Street, SW1V Gillingham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Greencoat Place, SW1P Greencoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greenwood, SE26 Greenwood is a road in the SE26 postcode area
Greycoat Gardens, SW1P Greycoat Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Place, SW1P Greycoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Street, SW1P Greycoat Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Grosvenor Gardens Mews East, SW1W Grosvenor Gardens Mews East is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Grosvenor Gardens Mews North, SW1W Grosvenor Gardens Mews North is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Grosvenor Gardens, SW1W Grosvenor Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Guildhouse Street, SW1V Guildhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Hatherley Street, SW1P Hatherley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hide Place, SW1P Hide Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hobart Place, SW1W Hobart Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Howick Place, SW1E This is a street in the SW1E postcode area
Howick Place, SW1P Howick Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Hudsons Place, SW1V Hudsons Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
King’s Scholars’ Passage, SW1P King’s Scholars’ Passage is a road in the SW1P postcode area
King’s Scholars’ Passage, SW1V King’s Scholars’ Passage is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Kingsgate Parade, SW1E Kingsgate Parade is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Lambs Close, SW1W Lambs Close is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Longmoore Street, SW1V Longmoore Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Lower Belgrave Street, SW1W Lower Belgrave Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Lower Grosvenor Place, SW1W Lower Grosvenor Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Main Concourse, SW1V Main Concourse is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Medway Street, SW1P Medway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Monck Street, SW1P Monck Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Mansions Morpeth Mansions, SW1P Morpeth Mansions Morpeth Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Mansions, SW1P Morpeth Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Morpeth Terrace, SW1P Morpeth Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Neat House Place, SW1V Neat House Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Neathouse Place, SW1V Neathouse Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
New Palace Yard, SW1A New Palace Yard was built by William II (William Rufus).
Old Pye Street, SW1P Old Pye Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Overbridge, SW11 A street within the SW1V postcode
Palace Street, SW1 This is a street in the SW1 postcode area
Palace Street, SW1E Palace Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Post Office Way, SW1P Post Office Way is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rochester Row, SW1P Rochester Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rochester Street, SW1P Rochester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rutherford Street, SW1P Rutherford Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Seaforth Place, SW1E Seaforth Place is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Spenser Street, SW1E Spenser Street is a road in the SW1E postcode area
St Anns Street, SW1P St Anns Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St Matthew Street, SW1P St Matthew Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St. Matthew Street, SW1P St. Matthew Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Stag Place, SW1E Stag Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Stillington Street, SW1P Stillington Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Strutton Ground, SW1P Strutton Ground is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Tachbrook Mews, SW1V Tachbrook Mews is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Terminus Place, SW1 Terminus Place is the home of Victoria Bus Station.
Terminus Place, SW1V Terminus Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Terminus Place, SW1W Terminus Place is a road in the SW1W postcode area
The Royal Mews, SW1E The Royal Mews is a road in the SW1E postcode area
The Royal Mews, SW1W The Royal Mews is a road in the SW1W postcode area
Thirleby Road, SW1P Thirleby Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Udall Street, SW1P Udall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Upper Tachbrook Street, SW1V Upper Tachbrook Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Vauxhall Bridge Road, SW1P This is a street in the SW1P postcode area
Vauxhall Bridge Road, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Victoria Arcade, SW1E Victoria Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Victoria Arcade, SW1V Victoria Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Victoria Square, SW1W Victoria Square, a small residential square, lies on land forming part of the Grosvenor Estate to the south of the Royal Mews.
Victoria Street, SW1E Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1H Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1W Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Victoria Subway, SW1X Victoria Subway is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Victoria Walk, E3 Victoria Walk is a road in the E3 postcode area
Vincent Square, SW1P Vincent Square is a large grass-covered square which provides playing fields for Westminster School, which owns it.
Walcott Street, SW1P Walcott Street was named after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret’s, Westminster in the 1840s.
Warwick Place North, SW1V Warwick Place North is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.
Warwick Row, SW1E Warwick Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Westminster Palace Gardens, SW1P Westminster Palace Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Wilcox Place, SW1E Wilcox Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Wilfred Street, SW1E Wilfred Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Willow Place, SW1P Willow Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Willow Place, SW1V Willow Place is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Willow Walk, N1 A street within the SW1V postcode
Wilton Road, SW1V Wilton Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1V postal area.



Pauline jones
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   
IP: 86.136.68.202
2:1:187
Post by Pauline jones: Bessborough Place, SW1V

I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved L

Message truncated Show whole message

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 6 Nov 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:2:187
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Beeston Place was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate and the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire.
Beeston Place was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate and the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=12074

VIEW THE VICTORIA AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE VICTORIA AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE VICTORIA AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE VICTORIA AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE VICTORIA AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Victoria

The railways largely replaced the canals as a means of transport. Uniquely for a main line station, Victoria station was built on top of one.

Before the railway arrived in 1862, this area - like the area immediately south of it - was known as Pimlico. The Grosvenor Canal ended in a large basin here.

Victoria station’s origins lie with the Great Exhibition of 1851, when a railway called the West End of London and Crystal Palace Railway came into existence, serving the site of the exhibition halls which had been transferred to Sydenham from Hyde Park. The terminus of that railway was at Stewarts Lane in Battersea on the south side of the river. In 1858 a joint enterprise was set up to take trains over the river: it was entitled the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway; and was a mile and a quarter in length. The railway was owned by four railway companies: the Great Western (GWR); London & North Western (LNWR); the London, Brighton and South Coast (LBSCR); and the London Chatham and Dover Railways (LCDR). It was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1858.

The station was built in two parts: those on the western side, opened in 1862, with six platforms, ten tracks and an hotel (the 300-bedroom Grosvenor) were occupied by the Brighton company; whilst adjacent, and in the same year, the Chatham company were to occupy a less imposing wooden-fronted building. The latter’s station had nine tracks and was shared by broad-gauge trains of the GWR, whose trains arrived from Southall via the West London Extension Joint Railway through Chelsea. The GWR remained part owner of the station until 1932, although its trains had long since ceased to use it. Each side of the station had its own entrance and a separate station master; a wall between the two sections effectively emphasised that fact.

At the start of the twentieth century both parts of the station were rebuilt. It now had a decent frontage and forecourt, but not as yet a unified existence. Work on the Brighton side was completed in 1908 and was carried out in red brick; the Grosvenor Hotel was rebuilt at the same time. The Chatham side, in a Edwardian style with baroque elements, designed by Alfred Bloomfield, was completed a year later. The two sections were eventually connected in 1924 by removing part of a screen wall, when the platforms were renumbered as an entity. The station was redeveloped internally in the 1980s, with the addition of shops within the concourse, and above the western platforms.

The station was now serving boat trains, and during WWI it became the hub of trains carrying soldiers to and from France, many of them wounded. After the war the Continental steamer traffic became concentrated there, including the most famous of those trains, the Golden Arrow. The area around the station also became a site for other other forms of transport: a bus station in the forecourt; a coach terminal to the south; and it is now the terminal for trains serving Gatwick Airport.

Victoria is also well-served by London underground. The sub-surface Circle and District Lines opened on December 24, 1868; and the Victoria Line line came to Victoria Station with the third phase of construction of the line - the station’s platforms were opened on March 7, 1969, six months after the Victoria line had started running in outer London.
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