London Bridge

Underground station, existing between 1836 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
3.229.122.219 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Underground station · Southwark · SE1 ·
FEBRUARY
23
2013

London Bridge railway station is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex in the London Borough of Southwark, occupying a large area on two levels immediately south-east of London Bridge.


The main line station, which is the oldest railway station in central London (current zone 1) and one of the oldest in the world, contains nine terminal platforms and six through platforms for services from the south and south east of London. Through services continue onto Charing Cross, Cannon Street or Blackfriars. In terms of passenger arrivals and departures it is the fourth busiest station within London as well as the UK as a whole, handling over 54 million people a year.

The London Underground station serves the Jubilee line and the Bank branch of the Northern line. The station is the sixth busiest on the Underground network and is the only station on the London Underground network with 'London' in its name.

The Northern Line station opened on 25 February 1900 as part of the City & South London Railway's (C&SLR's) revised route from Borough to Bank and Moorgate. The Jubilee Line station opened on 7 October 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension, although trains had been running through non-stop from the previous month. To enable the Jubilee Line to be constructed, months of major engineering works to relocate buried services in the surrounding streets had to be undertaken. A new ticket hall was created in the arches under the main-line station, providing improved interchange. During excavations a variety of Roman remains were found, including pottery and fragments of mosaics; some of these are now on display in the station.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

User unknown/public domain

THE STREETS OF LONDON BRIDGE
Block A, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cottons Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cottons Lane, SE1 Cottons Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Counter Street, SE1 Counter Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duke St Hill, SE1 Duke St Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duke Street Hill, SE1 Duke Street Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hay’s Lane, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Hays Galleria, SE1 Hays Galleria is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hays Lane, SE1 Hays Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Joiner Street, SE1 Joiner Street is now part of London Bridge Street.
Joiner Street, SE1 Joiner Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
London Bridge Street, SE1 London Bridge Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
London Bridge Walk, SE1 London Bridge Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Railway Approach, SE1 Railway Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Shipwright Yard, SE1 Shipwright Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Stainer Street, SE1 Stainer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.



VIEW THE SOUTHWARK AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTHWARK AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTHWARK AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTHWARK AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTHWARK AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Southwark

Southwark is the area immediately south of London Bridge, opposite the City of London.

Southwark is on a previously marshy area south of the River Thames. Recent excavation has revealed prehistoric activity including evidence of early ploughing, burial mounds and ritual activity. The area was originally a series of islands in the River Thames. This formed the best place to bridge the Thames and the area became an important part of Londinium owing its importance to its position as the endpoint of the Roman London Bridge. Two Roman roads, Stane Street and Watling Street, met at Southwark in what is now Borough High Street.

At some point the Bridge fell or was pulled down. Southwark and the city seem to have become largely deserted during the Early Middle Ages. Archaeologically, evidence of settlement is replaced by a largely featureless soil called the Dark Earth which probably (although this is contested) represents an urban area abandoned.

Southwark appears to recover only during the time of King Alfred and his successors. Sometime in and around 886 AD the Bridge was rebuilt and the City and Southwark restored. Southwark was called ’Suddringa Geworc’ which means the ’defensive works of the men of Surrey’. It was probably fortified to defend the bridge and hence the re-emerging City of London to the north. This defensive role is highlighted by the use of the Bridge as a defense against King Swein, his son King Cnut and in 1066, against King William the Conqueror. He failed to force the Bridge during the Norman conquest of England, but Southwark was devastated.

Much of Southwark was originally owned by the church - the greatest reminder of monastic London is Southwark Cathedral, originally the priory of St Mary Overy.

During the Middle Ages, Southwark remained outside of the control of the City and was a haven for criminals and free traders, who would sell goods and conduct trades outside the regulation of the City Livery Companies. An important market - later to become known as the Borough Market - was established there some time in the 13th century. The area was renowned for its inns, especially The Tabard, from which Chaucer’s pilgrims set off on their journey in The Canterbury Tales.

After many decades’ petitioning, in 1550, Southwark was incorporated into the City of London as ’The Ward of Bridge Without’. It became the entertainment district for London, and it was also the red-light area. In 1599, William Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was built on the South Bank in Southwark, though it burned down in 1613. A modern replica, also called the Globe, has been built near the original site. Southwark was also a favorite area for entertainment like bull and bear-baiting. There was also a famous fair in Southwark which took place near the Church of St. George the Martyr. William Hogarth depicted this fair in his engraving of Southwark Fair (1733).

In 1844 the railway reached Southwark with the opening of London Bridge station.

In 1861 the Great Fire of Southwark destroyed a large number of buildings between Tooley Street and the Thames, including those around Hays Wharf, where Hays Galleria was later built, and blocks to the west almost as far as St Olave’s Church.

In 1899 Southwark was incorporated along with Newington and Walworth into the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark, and in 1965 this was incorporated with the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey into the London Borough of Southwark.

Southwark tube station was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension.

The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only rail interchange is to London Waterloo East mainline station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over double the traffic of nearby Borough station and around triple Lambeth North.
Print-friendly version of this page