Hardy Road, SW19

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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Road · South Wimbledon · SW19 ·
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2000

Hardy Road was named after Thomas Hardy, Flag Captain of the HMS Victory.



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South Wimbledon

South Wimbledon is a suburb - also known as Merton - and tube station in South London.

Merton is ten minutes walk from Wimbledon centre, and is most obviously recognised by the busy crossroads at which South Wimbledon tube station is situated on one corner.

Admiral Nelson once had property in this part of London called Merton Place, and therefore a number of roads and pubs in the region (immediately to the east, and much further to the west, in Wimbledon Chase) are named after historically relevant battles and ships. The Nelson's Arms pub is on the road to Colliers Wood.

South Wimbledon station was designed by Charles Holden and was opened on 13 September 1926 as part of the Morden extension of the City & South London Railway (now part of the Northern Line).
South Wimbledon station - not being actually in Wimbledon - was given this name as it was thought that Wimbledon had a higher social standing than its actual location of Merton. On the original plan it had the name Merton Grove. For geographical accuracy, the station was originally named South Wimbledon (Merton) and it appeared as such on early tube maps and on the original station platform signage.
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