High Street, E1

Road in Ealing Broadway

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Road · Ealing Broadway · W5 · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
1
2000


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VIEW THE EALING BROADWAY AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE EALING BROADWAY AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE EALING BROADWAY AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE EALING BROADWAY AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE EALING BROADWAY AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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OTHER WHITECHAPEL ENTRIES

High Street, W8
(start year not known-now)

High Street, E1
(start year not known-now)

High Street, E11
(start year not known-now)

High Street, N17
(start year not known-now)

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Go to Whitechapel

Whitechapel

Whitechapel is a neighbourhood whose heart is Whitechapel Road itself, named for a small chapel of ease dedicated to St Mary.

By the late 1500s Whitechapel and the surrounding area had started becoming 'other half' of London. Located downwind of the genteel sections of west London which were to see the expansion of Westminster Abbey and construction of Buckingham Palace, it naturally attracted the more fragrant activities of the city, particularly tanneries, breweries, foundries (including the Whitechapel Bell Foundry which later cast Philadelphia's Liberty Bell and also Big Ben), slaughterhouses and, close by to the south, the gigantic Billingsgate fish market, famous in its day for the ornately foul language of the extremely Cockney fishwomen who worked there.

Population shifts from rural areas to London from the 1600s to the mid 1800s resulted in great numbers of more or less destitute people taking up residence amidst the industries and mercantile interests that had attracted them. By the 1840s Whitechapel, along with the enclaves of Wapping, Aldgate, Bethnal Green, Mile End, Limehouse and Stepney (collectively known today as the East End), had evolved, or devolved, into classic 'dickensian' London. Whitechapel Road itself was not particularly squalid through most of this period - it was the warren of small dark streets branching from it that contained the greatest suffering, filth and danger, especially Dorset St., Thrawl St., Berners St. (renamed Henriques St.), Wentworth St. and others.

In the Victorian era the base population of poor English country stock was swelled by immigrants from all over, particularly Irish and Jewish. 1888 saw the depredations of the Whitechapel Murderer, later known as 'Jack the Ripper'. In 1902, American author Jack London, looking to write a counterpart to Jacob Riis's seminal book How the Other Half Lives, donned ragged clothes and boarded in Whitechapel, detailing his experiences in The People of the Abyss. Riis had recently documented the astoundingly bad conditions in the leading city of the United States. Jack London, a socialist, thought it worthwhile to explore conditions in the leading city of the nation that had created modern capitalism. He concluded that English poverty was far rougher than the American variety. The juxtaposition of the poverty, homelessness, exploitive work conditions, prostitution, and infant mortality of Whitechapel and other East End locales with some of the greatest personal wealth the world has ever seen made it a focal point for leftist reformers of all kinds, from George Bernard Shaw, whose Fabian Society met regularly in Whitechapel, to Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, who boarded and led rallies in Whitechapel during his exile from Russia.

Whitechapel remained poor (and colourful) through the first half of the 20th Century, though somewhat less desperately so. It suffered great damage in the V2 German rocket attacks and the Blitz of World War II. Since then, Whitechapel has lost its notoriety, though it is still thoroughly working class. The Bangladeshis are the most visible migrant group there today and it is home to many aspiring artists and shoestring entrepreneurs.

Since the 1970s, Whitechapel and other nearby parts of East London have figured prominently in London's art scene. Probably the most prominent art venue is the Whitechapel Art Gallery, founded in 1901 and long an outpost of high culture in a poor neighbourhood. As the neighbourhood has gentrified, it has gained citywide, and even international, visibility and support.

Whitechapel, is a London Underground and London Overground station, on Whitechapel Road was opened in 1876 by the East London Railway on a line connecting Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations south of the River Thames. The station site was expanded in 1884, and again in 1902, to accommodate the services of the Metropolitan District Railway, a predecessor of the London Underground. The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding, initially reopening for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Alacross Road, W5 · Almond Avenue, W5 · Alperton Lane, W5 · Ascott Avenue, W5 · Ash Grove, W5 · Ashbourne Close, W5 · Ashbourne Parade, W5 · Ashbourne Road, W5 · Aston Road, W5 · Audley Road, W5 · B455, W5 · Balmain Close, W5 · Barnes Pikle, W5 · Baronsmede, W5 · Beaufort Close, W5 · Beaufort Road, W5 · Beech Gardens, W5 · Blakesley Avenue, W5 · Blakesley Court, W5 · Blandford Road, W5 · Blondin Avenue, W5 · Bloomsbury Close, W5 · Bond Street, W5 · Bramley Road, W5 · Brook Close, W5 · Byron Road, W5 · Carlton Gardens, W5 · Carlton Road, W5 · Carlyle Road, W5 · Carville Crescent, W5 · Castlebar Road, W5 · Cedar Grove, W5 · Central Buildings, W5 · Central Chambers, W5 · Chandos Avenue, W5 · Charlbury Grove, W5 · Chatsfield Place, W5 · Chatsworth Rise, W5 · Chatsworth Road, W5 · Chestnut Grove, W5 · Chilton Avenue, W5 · Church Gardens, W5 · Church Lane, W5 · Church Place, W5 · Clayponds Avenue, W5 · Clayponds Gardens, W5 · Cleveley Crescent, W5 · Clovelly Road, W5 · Coningsby Road, W5 · Connell Crescent, W5 · Corfton Road, W5 · Corringway, W5 · Craven Avenue, W5 · Craven Road, W5 · Creffield Road, W5 · Crosslands Avenue, W5 · Dallas Road, W5 · Daniel Road, W5 · Darwin Road, W5 · Delamere Road, W5 · Dorset Road, W5 · Ealing Broadway Centre, W5 · Ealing Broadway Shopping, W5 · Ealing Green, W5 · Ealing Park Gardens, W5 · Ealing Park Mansions, W5 · Ealing Scout Hall, W5 · Ealing Studios, W5 · Ealing Village, W5 · East Close, W5 · Eaton Rise, W5 · Elderberry Road, W5 · Elers Road, W5 · Elgar Avenue, W5 · Elm Avenue, W5 · Elm Crescent, W5 · Elm Grove Road, W5 · Elmcroft Close, W5 · Evelyn Grove, W5 · Fielding Terrace Uxbridge Road, W5 · Fielding Terrace, W5 · Fir Tree Close, W5 · Florence Road, W5 · Francis Court, W5 · Freeland Road, W5 · Gilbert Court, W5 · Gloucester Road, W5 · Golf Road, W5 · Gordon Road, W5 · Grange Park, W5 · Grange Road, W5 · Granville Gardens, W5 · Green Vale, W5 · Grosvenor Parade, W5 · Grove Court, W5 · Grove Road, W5 · Gunnersbury Drive, W5 · Hamilton Court, W5 · Hamilton Road, W5 · Hanger Green, W5 · Hanger Vale Lane, W5 · Harriers Close, W5 · Hart Grove, W5 · Hartley Court, W5 · Haven Green, W5 · Haven Lane, W5 · Haven Place, W5 · Hazelwood Close, W5 · Heath Close, W5 · Heathcroft, W5 · Helena Road, W5 · High Street, E1 · High Street, E11 · High Street, N17 · High Street, W5 · High Street, W5 · High Street, W8 · Hill Court, W5 · Hillcrest Road, W5 · Hillcroft Crescent, W5 · Hillside Road, W5 · Hogarth Close, W5 · Hollies Road, W5 · Inglis Road, W5 · Julien Road, W5 · Junction Road, W5 · Kenilworth Road, W5 · Kerrison Road, W5 · Keswick Mews, W5 · Kings Avenue, W5 · Kings Road, W5 · Leopold Road, W5 · Level One Town Square Ealing Broadway Centre, W5 · Limes Walk, W5 · Little Ealing Lane, W5 · Littlewood Close, W5 · Longfield Avenue, W5 · Longfield Road, W5 · Longfield Walk, W5 · Lothair Road, W5 · Madeley Road, W5 · Maple Grove, W5 · Marchwood Crescent, W5 · Marchwood Cresent, W5 · Marlborough Road, W5 · Marryatt Court, W5 · Marsh Road, W5 · Masons Green Lane, W5 · Mattock Lane, W5 · Montpelier Avenue, W5 · Montpelier Road, W5 · Mount Close, W5 · Mount Park Crescent, W5 · Mount Park Cresent, W5 · Mount Park Road, W5 · Mountfield Road, W5 · Murray Road, W5 · New Broadway, W5 · New Ealing Broadway, W5 · Nicholas Gardens, W5 · Noel Road, W5 · North Common Road, W5 · North Road, W5 · Northcote Avenue, W5 · Northfield Avenue, W5 · Oak Road, W5 · Oak Tree Close, W5 · Oakley Avenue, W5 · Occupation Lane, W5 · Olive Road, W5 · Overdale Road, W5 · Oxford Road, W5 · Park Hill, W5 · Park Place, W5 · Park View Road, W5 · Popes Lane, W5 · Queen Anne’s Grove, W5 · Queen Annes Gardens, W5 · Queen’s Road, W5 · Queens Drive, W5 · Queens Parade, W5 · Ranelagh Road, W5 · Regal Close, W5 · Richmond Road, W5 · Ritz Parade, W5 · Rotherwick Hill, W5 · Rowan Close, W5 · Royal Parade, W5 · Saint Leonards Road, W5 · Saint Pauls Close, W5 · Sandringham Mews Car Park, W5 · South Ealing Road, W5 · South Road, W5 · Spring Bridge Mews, W5 · Spring Bridge Road, W5 · Springbridge Road, W5 · St Leonards Road, W13 · St Mary’s Court, W5 · St Marys Road, W5 · St Matthews Road, W5 · St Pauls Close, W5 · St Peter’s Way, W5 · St Xaviours Mall, W5 · Station Road, W5 · Stuart Avenue, W5 · Sunnyside Road, W5 · Swyncombe Avenue, W5 · Temple Road, W5 · The Broadway, W5 · The Common, W5 · The Corner, W5 · The Croft, W5 · The Firs, W5 · The Grove, W5 · The Knoll, W13 · The Mall, W5 · The Parade, W5 · The Park, W5 · The Pavement Popes Lane, W5 · The Pavement, W5 · The Quadrant, W5 · The Ride, W5 · The Ridings, W5 · The Waterglade Centre, W5 · Townsend Road, nr Ealing Broadway · Trent Avenue, W5 · Tring Avenue, W5 · Uxbridge Road, W5 · Vale Lane, W5 · Venetia Road, W5 · Victoria Road, W5 · Waldegrave Road, W5 · Walpole Court, W5 · Warwick Dene, W5 · Warwick Road, W5 · Watermans Mews, W5 · Webster Gardens, W5 · Wellington Road, W5 · Welsby Court, W5 · West Lodge Avenue, W3 · West Ridge Court, W5 · West Road, W5 · West Walk, W5 · Westbury Road, W5 · Western Avenue, W5 · Western Gardens, W5 · Western Road, W5 · Weymouth Avenue, W5 · Whitestile Road, W5 · Windmill Road, W5 · Windsor Road, W5 · Wolverton Gardens, W5 · Woodgrange Avenue, W5 · Woodville Gardens, W5 · Woodville Road, W5 ·


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Links

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British History Online
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Time Out
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Maps


John Rocque Map of Ealing and Acton (1762)
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers an area from Greenford in the northwest to Hammersmith in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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