Holly Walk, NW3

Road in Hampstead, existing between 1750 and now

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Road · Hampstead · NW3 · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
30
2016
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Holly Walk connects Holly Hill with Church Row.

In 1811, Hampstead vestry bought a 2½ acre field on the east side of Holly Walk for a churchyard, which it made from only the southern portion.

Most of the cottages which line Holly Walk date from 1813.

St Mary’s Catholic Church was built in 1796 by and for refugees who fled their homeland during the French Revolution.

Beyond the church a plaque on the wall of number 9 Holly Place, named The Watch House, advises that "in the 1830s the newly formed Hampstead Police Force set out on its patrol and nightly watch from this house."

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

VIEW THE HAMPSTEAD AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE HAMPSTEAD AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE HAMPSTEAD AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE HAMPSTEAD AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE HAMPSTEAD AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Go to Hampstead

Hampstead

Hampstead though now considered an integral part of London, has retained much of its village charm.

Hampstead is on a steep hill and the tube station platforms are the deepest on the London Underground network, at 58.5 metres below ground level. It has the deepest lift shaft on the Underground.

Although early records of Hampstead itself can be found in a grant by King Ethelred the Unready to the monastery of St. Peter's at Westminster (AD 986) and it is referred to in the Domesday Book (1086), the history of Hampstead is generally traced back to the 17th century.

Trustees of the Well started advertising the medicinal qualities of the chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) in 1700. Although Hampstead Wells was initially successful, its popularity declined in the 1800s due to competition with other London spas. The spa was demolished in 1882, although a water fountain was left behind.

Hampstead started to expand following the opening of the North London Railway in the 1860s (now on the London Overground), and expanded further after the tube station opened in 1907.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
6 Ellerdale Road:   6 Ellerdale Road is a house built by the Arts and Crafts movement architect Richard Norman Shaw for himself in the period 1874 to 1876.
An introduction to Hampstead by G.E. Mitton (1902):   This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902)
Anna Freud Centre:   The Anna Freud Centre is a child mental health research, training and treatment centre.
Bracknell Way, NW3:   Bracknell Way is a small alleyway, usable only by pedestrians
Branch Hill Pond:   Branch Hill Pond which was fed from a spring which was also the main source of the Westbourne.
Bull and Bush:   The Old Bull and Bush is a Grade II listed public house near Hampstead Heath in London which gave its name to the music hall song ’Down at the old Bull and Bush’.
Devonshire House Preparatory School:   Devonshire House preparatory school is based in four large Victorian houses in Hampstead.
Everyman Cinema:   The Everyman, in Heath Street, Hampstead, opened as a cinema on 26 December 1933.
Fitzjohn’s Primary School:   Fitzjohn’s Primary School is a community primary school, established in 1953.
Freud Museum:   The Freud Museum is a museum dedicated to Sigmund Freud, who lived there with his family during the last year of his life.
Great Hollow Elm:   The Great Hollow Elm stood at the top of Hampstead Heath.
Hampstead:   Hampstead though now considered an integral part of London, has retained much of its village charm.
Hampstead Town:   This article first appeared in ’A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 9, Hampstead, Paddington’.
Hampstead tunnel:   Hampstead Tunnel, 1166 yards long, was built as part of the Hampstead Junction Railway, and opened on 2 January 1860.
Hare and Hounds:   The Hare and Hounds was the northernmost public house in Hampstead.
Keats House:   Keats House is a writer’s house museum in a house once occupied by the Romantic poet John Keats.
Netherhall House:   Netherhall House is a catered intercollegiate halls of residence for men, founded in 1952.
New West End:   New West End was created in the 1840s on the Finchley Road.
Pentameters Theatre:   The Pentameters Theatre was founded in 1968 and is 60-seat venue and is a fringe theatre, located above the Three Horseshoes public house in Hampstead.
Piecemeal building:   The infant River Westbourne crossed, what in 1900, was still a boggy field.
Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel:   The Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel is a place of worship and a member of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarians.
Rosslyn House:   Rosslyn (Roslyn) House, which stood between Wedderburn and Lyndhurst Roads, was one of the last of the famous old Hampstead houses to be destroyed.
Shepherd’s Well:   Shepherd’s Well, whose flow was thought to be nearly as pure as distilled water, is the source of the River Tyburn.
Source of the Kilbourne:   The easternmost branch of the River Westbourne rises just south of the centre of Hampstead,
St John, Hampstead:   St John-at-Hampstead is a Church of England parish church dedicated to St John the Evangelist.
St Mary’s Church:   St Mary’s Chapel, now known as St Mary’s Church, is a Grade II* listed Roman Catholic church.
The Academy School:   http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29835879
The Royal School, Hampstead:   The Royal School, Hampstead, was an independent girls’ day and boarding school. The school educated girls aged 3-16.
Two streams meet:   Somewhere beneath the basement of 16 Frognal, NW3 two tributaries of the River Westbourne meet.
University College School:   University College School, generally known as UCS, is an independent school charity situated in northwest London.
Whitestone Pond:   Whitestone Pond is the source of one of London’s lost rivers, the River Westbourne.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Hampstead station (1907):   Hampstead station pictured at its opening in 1907
Jack Straw's Castle (1907):   Jack Straw’s Castle Hotel, photographed in 1907.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Arkwright Road, NW3 · Avenue Mansions, NW3 · Back Lane, NW3 · Birchwood Drive, NW3 · Bracknell Gardens, NW3 · Branch Hill, NW3 · Carlingford Road, NW3 · Carnegie House, NW3 · Chesterford Gardens, NW3 · Christ Church, NW3 · Christchurch Hill, NW3 · Church Row, NW3 · Coach House Yard, NW3 · Croft Way, NW3 · Croftway, NW3 · Denning Road, NW3 · Downshire Hill, NW3 · East Heath Road, NW3 · Ellerdale Close, NW3 · Ellerdale Road, NW3 · Falcon Lodge, NW3 · Ferncroft Avenue, NW3 · Fitzjohn's Avenue, NW3 · Flask Cottages, NW3 · Flask Walk, NW3 · Fortune Green Road, NW3 · Frognal Close, NW3 · Frognal Lane, NW3 · Frognal Way, NW3 · Frognal, NW3 · Frognal, NW3 · Gardnor Road, NW3 · Gayton Crescent, NW3 · Gayton Road, NW3 · Greenaway Gardens, NW3 · Greenhill, NW3 · Grove Place, NW3 · Hampstead High Street, NW3 · Hampstead Hill Gardens, NW3 · Hampstead Square, NW3 · Heath Drive, NW3 · Heath Hurst Road, NW3 · Heath Street, NW3 · Holly Berry Lane, NW3 · Holly Bush Vale, NW3 · Holly Hill, NW3 · Holly Mount, NW3 · Holly Walk, NW3 · Keats Grove, NW3 · Kemplay Road, NW3 · Kidderpore Avenue, NW3 · Kidderpore Gardens, NW3 · Lakis Close, NW3 · Langland Gardens, NW3 · Lindfield Gardens, NW3 · Lyndhurst Road, NW3 · Maresfield Gardens, NW3 · Netherhall Gardens, NW3 · Netherhall Way, NW3 · New End Square, NW3 · New End, NW3 · Nutley Terrace, NW3 · Oak Hill Park Mews, NW3 · Oak Hill Park Mews, NW3 · Oak Hill Park, NW3 · Oak Hill Way, NW3 · Oakhill Avenue, NW3 · Old Brewery Mews, NW3 · Oriel Court, NW3 · Oriel Place, NW3 · Palace Court, NW3 · Perrins Court, NW3 · Perrins Walk, NW3 · Pilgrims Lane, NW3 · Pilgrims Place, NW3 · Prince Arthur Mews, NW3 · Prince Arthur Road, NW3 · Redington Gardens, NW3 · Redington Road, NW3 · Rosecroft Avenue, NW3 · Rosslyn Hill, NW3 · Rosslyn Mews, NW3 · Rudall Crescent, NW3 · Shepherd's Path, NW3 · Shepherds Walk, NW3 · Spaniards Road, NW3 · Spedan Close, NW3 · Streatley Place, NW3 · Studholme Court, NW3 · The Wells House, NW3 · Thurlow Road, NW3 · Vane Close, NW3 · Village Mount, NW3 · Well Road, NW3 · Well Walk, NW3 · Willoughby Road, NW3 · Willow Road, NW3 · Windmill Hill, NW3 · Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3 ·


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Links

The Fascination of Hampstead
By G. E. Mitton (1902)
Hampstead
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Finchley Road
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West Hampstead
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Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Londonist
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British History Online
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Time Out
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Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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