Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A

Road in Westminster

 HOME  ARTICLE  MAP  FULLSCREEN  STREETS  RECENT  BLOG  HELP  CONTACT 
Click here to log in on Facebook Advanced
MAPPING:1750180018301860190019302017Fullscreen map
Road · Westminster · SW1A · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
1
2000


This location is in the database but we do not know any more about it.

If you wish to contibute information to this location, or any other location, you can use your Facebook login to authorise The Underground Map app and tell other users the story of your area, street or house.

The app is simply used to authorise users and will not post to Facebook.
VIEW THE WESTMINSTER AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WESTMINSTER AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE WESTMINSTER AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE WESTMINSTER AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE WESTMINSTER AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
 Upload an image
You can add an image to this location if you are logged into our Facebook app.
 Add new information to this location
You can add text to this location if you are logged into our Facebook app.
 
 Log on via Facebook
You can use a Facebook id to add material to this website.

Address not listed? Add it here...
Go to Westminster

Westminster

Westminster - heart of government.

Westminster lies on the north bank of the River Thames, southwest of the City of London. It has a large concentration of London's historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus often used as a metonym for Parliament and the political community of the United Kingdom generally. The civil service is similarly referred to by the area it inhabits, Whitehall, and Westminster is consequently also used in reference to the Westminster System, the parliamentary model of democratic government that has evolved in the United Kingdom.

The term Westminster Village, sometimes used in the context of British politics, does not refer to a geographical area at all; employed especially in the phrase Westminster Village gossip, it denotes a supposedly close social circle of Members of Parliament, political journalists, so-called spin doctors and others connected to events in the Palace of Westminster.

The historic core of Westminster is the former Thorney Island on which Westminster Abbey was built. The Abbey became the traditional venue of the coronation of the kings and queens of England. The nearby Palace of Westminster came to be the principal royal residence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and later housed the developing Parliament and law courts of England. It can be said that London thus has developed two distinct focal points: an economic one in the City of London; and a political and cultural one in Westminster, where the Royal Court had its home. This division is still very apparent today.

The monarchy later moved to the Palace of Whitehall a little towards the north-east. The law courts have since moved to the Royal Courts of Justice, close to the border of the City of London.

The Westminster area formed part of the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex. The ancient parish was St Margaret; after 1727 split into the parishes of St Margaret and St John. The area around Westminster Abbey formed the extra-parochial Close of the Collegiate Church of St Peter surrounded by—but not part of—either parish. Until 1900 the local authority was the combined vestry of St Margaret and St John (also known as the Westminster District Board of Works from 1855 to 1887), which was based at Westminster City Hall on Caxton Street from 1883. The Liberty of Westminster, governed by the Westminster Court of Burgesses, also included St Martin in the Fields and several other parishes and places. Westminster had its own quarter sessions, but the Middlesex sessions also had jurisdiction. The area was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London in 1889 and the local government of Westminster was reformed in 1900 when the court of burgesses and parish vestries were abolished, to be replaced with a metropolitan borough council. The council was given city status, allowing it to be known as Westminster City Council.

The underground station was opened as Westminster Bridge on 24 December 1868 by the steam-operated Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) (now the District line) when the railway opened the first section of its line from South Kensington. It was originally the eastern terminus of the MDR and the station cutting ended at a concrete wall buffered by timber sleepers. The approach to the station from the west runs in cut and cover tunnel under the roadway of Broad Sanctuary and diagonally under Parliament Square. In Broad Sanctuary the tunnel is close to Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's church and care was required to avoid undermining their foundations when excavating in the poor ground found there.

The station was completely rebuilt to incorporate new deep-level platforms for the Jubilee line when it was extended to the London Docklands in the 1990s. During the works, the level of the sub-surface platforms was lowered to enable ground level access to Portcullis House. This was achieved in small increments carried out when the line was closed at night.









LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Ackermann’s:   Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
Charing Cross:   Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square in central London. It gives its name to several local landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station, one of the main London rail termini.
Embankment:   Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including "Embankment".
Hungerford Stairs:   The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.
Northumberland House:   Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, who were the Dukes of Northumberland.
Shipley's Drawing School:   101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.
Westminster:   Westminster - heart of government.
Westminster Abbey:   Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is one of the world’s greatest churches.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Buses outside the National Gallery:   Buses outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square (1927).
Parker Street looking east (1905):   Before being renamed to Matthew Parker Street, old Parker Street was a Westminster slum.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Abingdon Street, SW1P · Adam Street, WC2N · Adelaide Street, WC2N · Adelphi Terrace, WC2N · Agar Street, WC2N · Archway Mall, N19 · Barton Street, SW1P · Bridge Street, SW1A · Broad Sanctuary, SW1P · Brydges Place, WC2N · Buckingham Street, WC2N · Cannon Street, WC2N · Canon Row, SW1A · Charing Cross, SW1A · Cowley Street, SW1P · Craven Passage, WC2N · Craven Street, WC2N · Dean Stanley Street, SW1P · Dean Trench Street, SW1P · Deans Yard, SW1P · Derby Gate, SW1A · Downing Street, SW1A · Duck Island Cottage, SW1A · Duncannon Street, WC2N · Durham House Street, WC2N · Embankment Place, WC2N · Gayfere Street, SW1P · George Court, WC2N · Goodwins Court, WC2N · Great College Street, SW1P · Great George Street, SW1P · Great Peter Street, SW1P · Great Scotland Yard, SW1A · Great Smith Street, SW1P · Heathcock Court, WC2R · Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A · Horse Guards Road, SW1A · Horseferry Road, SW1P · Hungerford House, WC2N · Hyde Park, SW1A · Irving Street, WC2H · John Adam Street, WC2N · King Charles Street, SW1A · Lancaster Place, WC2E · Little College Street, SW1P · Little Deans Yard, SW1P · Little George Street, SW1P · Lord North Street, SW1P · Marsham Street, SW1P · Norman Shaw Building North, SW1A · North Court, SW1P · Northumberland Avenue, WC2N · Northumberland Street, WC2N · Palace Of Westminster, SW1A · Parliament Square, SW1P · Parliament Street, SW1A · Pickering Place, SW1A · Plymouth Devonport Constituency, SW1A · Queens Gardens, SW1A · Richmond House Whitehall, SW1A · Robert Street, WC2N · Rochford Southend East, SW1A · Romney Street, SW1P · Savoy Court, WC2R · Savoy Hill, WC2R · Savoy Place, WC2N · Savoy Place, WC2R · Savoy Street, WC2E · Savoy Street, WC2R · Smith Square, SW1P · Spring Gardens, SW1A · St Jamess Park, SW1A · St Margaret Street, SW1A · St Margarets Street, SW1A · St Margarets Street, SW1P · St Martins Place, WC2H · St Martins Place, WC2N · Storeys Gate, SW1H · Storeys Gate, SW1P · Strand, WC2A · Strand, WC2N · Strand, WC2R · Street, WC2N · The Arches, WC2N · The Mall, SW1A · The National Gallery, WC2N · The Sanctuary, SW1P · The Strand, WC2N · Trafalgar Square, WC2N · Tufton Street, SW1P · Victoria Embankment Gardens, WC2N · Victoria Embankment, SW1A · Victoria Embankment, WC2N · Villiers Street, WC2N · Warwick House Street, SW1Y · Westminster Mansions, SW1P · Westminster Pier, SW1A · Whitehall Court, SW1A · Whitehall Place, SW1A · Whitehall, SW1A · William Iv Street, WC2N · William Street, WC2N · York Buildings, WC2N ·


USING THIS MATERIAL IN OTHER ARTICLES


COMMENTS

Print-friendly version of this page

What is Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A like as a place to live?

Data from placeilive.com/

Links

Temple
Facebook Page
Leicester Square
Facebook Page
Tottenham Court Road
Facebook Page
Westminster
Facebook Page
Embankment
Facebook Page
Covent Garden
Facebook Page
Charing Cross
Facebook Page
St. James’s Park
Facebook Page
Piccadilly Circus
Facebook Page
Waterloo
Facebook Page
Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Edith’s Streets
A wander through London, street by street

Maps


Central London, north east (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north east.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Cruchley's New Plan of London (1848) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cruchley's New Plan of London Shewing all the new and intended improvements to the Present Time. - Cruchley's Superior Map of London, with references to upwards of 500 Streets, Squares, Public Places & C. improved to 1848: with a compendium of all Place of Public Amusements also shewing the Railways & Stations.
G. F. Cruchley

Cary's New And Accurate Plan of London and Westminster (1818) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cary's map provides a detailed view of London. With print date of 1 January 1818, Cary's map has 27 panels arranged in 3 rows of 9 panels, each measuring approximately 6 1/2 by 10 5/8 inches. The complete map measures 32 1/8 by 59 1/2 inches. Digitising this map has involved aligning the panels into one contiguous map.
John Cary

John Rocque Map of London (1762) FREE DOWNLOAD
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers central London at a reduced level of detail compared with his 1745-6 map.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1843) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured.
Chapman and Hall, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1836) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Insets: A view of the Tower from London Bridge -- A view of London from Copenhagen Fields. Includes views of facades of 25 structures "A comparison of the principal buildings of London."
Chapman and Hall, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
1 


COPYRIGHT TERMS:
Unless a source is explicitedly stated, text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Articles may be a remixes of various Wikipedia articles plus work by the website authors - original Wikipedia source can generally be accessed under the same name as the main title. This does not affect its Creative Commons attribution.

Maps upon this website are in the public domain because they are mechanical scans of public domain originals, or – from the available evidence – are so similar to such a scan or photocopy that no copyright protection can be expected to arise. The originals themselves are in public domain for the following reason:
Public domain Maps used are in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighbouring rights.

This tag is designed for use where there may be a need to assert that any enhancements (eg brightness, contrast, colour-matching, sharpening) are in themselves insufficiently creative to generate a new copyright. It can be used where it is unknown whether any enhancements have been made, as well as when the enhancements are clear but insufficient. For usage, see Commons:When to use the PD-scan tag.