Red Lion

Pub/bar/cafe in Kilburn, existed between 1444 and 2012

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Pub/bar/cafe · Kilburn · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
FEBRUARY
2
2015
Click to enlarge image.
View of The Red Lion, a roadside inn on the Edgware Road at Kilburn. The Edgware Road is a long straight road which runs from Oxford Street to St John's Wood, following the course of the old Roman road heading north out of London to the Middlesex village of Edgware and beyond. There were a number of inns built to serve travellers along the road, including the Red Lion which dated back to the 15th century.
Credit: C. A. Prestel. Etching fated 1789.

Rebuilt in the late 19th century, this pub had occupied this site since 1444.

This pub was known as The Westbury at time of closure in 2012.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Go to Kilburn High Road

Kilburn High Road

What was Watling Street in earlier times, became Edgware Road and finally Kilburn High Road.

It is a varied street. AA Milne lived at one end of the High Road and WH Smith at the other. Dickens once drank in The Black Lion. Ella Fitzgerald once sang in The Gaumont State Theatre, later a bingo hall, later still, a church. Ian Dury's original band was called "Kilburn And The High Roads".

Kilburn High Road railway station opened in 1852 as Kilburn & Maida Vale station by the LNWR. The current footbridge and street-level buildings are not so much the result of modernisation but of three or four major fires which have occurred here since the early 1970s. It is now part of the London Overground.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Bayswater Rivulet:   The Bayswater Rivulet was the original name for the Westbourne River
Cannon Stream:   The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Kilburn Bridge:   Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge Farm:   Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn Grange Park:   Kilburn Grange Park is a 3.2 hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn High Road:   What was Watling Street in earlier times, became Edgware Road and finally Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn Park:   Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm:   Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Kilburn Wells:   Kilburn Wells. a medicinal spring, existed between 1714 and the 1860s.
The Grange:   The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Kilburn High Road (1880s):   This photo was taken on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Eresby Road, which has since disappeared.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Abbey Road, NW6 · Abbots Place, NW6 · Addison Court, NW6 · Alpha Place, NW6 · Andover Place, NW6 · Andover Place, W9 · Birchington Road, NW6 · Bransdale Close, NW6 · Brondesbury Mews, NW6 · Buckley Road, NW6 · Cambridge Avenue, NW6 · Cambridge Court, NW6 · Cambridge Gardens, NW6 · Carlton Vale, NW6 · Carlton Vale, W9 · Cathedral Walk, NW6 · Chichester Road, NW6 · Colas Mews, NW6 · Coventry Close, NW6 · Daynor House, NW6 · Dibdin House, W9 · Douglas Court, NW6 · Dunster Gardens, NW6 · Goldsmith Place, NW6 · Gorefield Place, NW6 · Grange Place, NW6 · Grangeway, NW6 · Greville Mews, NW6 · Greville Place, NW6 · Greville Place, W9 · Greville Road, NW6 · Helmsdale House, NW6 · Hermit Place, NW6 · Hillside Close, NW6 · Kilburn Bridge, NW6 · Kilburn High Road, NW6 · Kilburn Park Road, W9 · Kilburn Place, NW6 · Kilburn Priory, NW6 · Kilburn Square, NW6 · Kilburn Vale, NW6 · Kingsgate Place, NW6 · Kingsgate Road, NW6 · Linburn House, NW6 · Linstead Street, NW6 · Loveridge Road, NW6 · Mallard Close, NW6 · Manor Mews, NW6 · Maple Mews, NW6 · Mazenod Avenue, NW6 · Mortimer Crescent, NW6 · Mortimer Crescent, NW6 · Mortimer Place, NW6 · Mutrix Road, NW6 · Netherwood Street, NW6 · Oxford Road, NW6 · Palmerston Road, NW6 · Plaza Parade, NW6 · Princess Road, NW6 · Priory Terrace, NW6 · Quex Mews, NW6 · Quex Road, NW6 · Randolph Gardens, NW6 · Regents Plaza, NW6 · Rudolph Road, NW6 · Springfield Lane, NW6 · Springfield Walk, NW6 · Swiss Terrace, NW6 · The Arches, NW6 · Torridon House, NW6 · Wavel Mews, NW6 · Webheath, NW6 · Wells Court, NW6 ·


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Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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