Holborn Circus, EC1N

Road in/near Farringdon, existing between 1867 and now

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Road · Farringdon · EC1N ·
July
19
2017

Holborn Circus is a junction of five highways in the City of London, on the boundary between Holborn, Hatton Garden and Smithfield.


It was designed by the engineer William Haywood and opened in 1867. The term circus describes the way the frontages of the buildings surrounding the junction curve.

On one side lies the church of St Andrew, Holborn, an ancient guild church that survived the Great Fire of London. However, the parochial authority decided, nevertheless, to commission Christopher Wren to rebuild it. Although the nave was destroyed in the Blitz, the reconstruction was faithful to Wren’s original. Many other buildings surrounding Holborn Circus were severely damaged during the Blitz. After the end of the Second World War, many were demolished.

Holborn Circus was described in Charles Dickens’ Dictionary of London (1879) as "perhaps... the finest piece of street architecture in the City".

Read the Holborn Circus entry on the Wikipedia...


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Farringdon

Farringdon station - the terminus for the very first underground railway in 1863 - is a London Underground and National Rail station in Clerkenwell, just north of the City of London in the London Borough of Islington. It will change significantly when it becomes an important interchange station between the two largest transport infrastructure programmes currently under way in London, the Thameslink Programme and Crossrail, both of which are scheduled for completion in 2018.

Farringdon is partly within the City of London and partly in the London Borough of Islington. The name originates from the names of wards of the old City (Farringdon Within, Farringdon Without).

Today, as a place Farringdon is somewhat ill-defined, its original site and layout having perhaps been lost under later development: little more than the station and a few street names help to locate it now.
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