Hackney College

College/University in Fortune Green, existing between 1885 and now

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College/University · Fortune Green · NW3 · Contributed by The Underground Map
FEBRUARY
18
2015
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Hackney College at the turn of the twentieth century.

This was renamed as Hackney College in 1871 and later relocated from its origins in Hackney to a new building in Hampstead.

New College, another institution, and Hackney College became constituents of the University of London's Faculty of Theology when the faculty was created in 1900. They were united by Act of Parliament in 1924 as Hackney and New College, which was renamed New College, London in 1936.

New buildings were erected behind the Hackney College premises at Hampstead, and were opened in 1938.

When, in 1972, most English Congregational churches joined the newly formed United Reformed Church (URC), and only a small number remained independent, the New College's work was reorganised. In 1976, its library was donated to Dr Williams's Library. Since 1981, the work of the college has been continued by the New College London Foundation, which trains ministers for the URC and Congregational churches.

After closure in 1977 the New College buildings were leased to the Open University, which assigned its rights to the Paris Chamber of Commerce in 2001, as the campus of ESCP-EAP. The freehold of the buildings were sold to the Paris Chamber of Commerce in 2005 and the funds distributed to the four beneficiaries, the United Reformed Church, the Congregational Federation, The Evangelical Fellowship of Congregational Churches and the Unaffiliated Congregational Churches Charity.

Latterly, the establishment became the ESCP Europe Business School.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Go to Fortune Green

Fortune Green

Fortune Green was originally part of the district of Hampstead but became physically separated from it by the building of the new turnpike road (now Finchley Road) in the 1830s.

The name of Fortune Green is derived from foran-tune meaning in front of the tun, probably an inn in the area.

Originally Fortune Green was a patch of manorial waste, now in the north of the ward, where local residents had the right to graze animals, dig turf and play sports. The Green dwindled considerably in the 19th century when the lord of the manor granted enclosure rights for about a third of the area.

Lying on the south-west side of the Finchley Road, Hampstead town council decided to build its overflow cemetery here in the 1840s.

The arrival of the Midland Railway in 1871 brought rapid development and many large houses were demolished in favour of higher density buildings. Victorian residential buildings display considerable variety in their design and detail and there are a number of large distinctive red brick mansion blocks, most of which have remained unaltered.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Alice House:   What is now the Alice House has been through a number of incarnations since it was built in the early 1900s.
Beckford's Estate:   Beckfords, belonging to the family of the same name, consisted of 15 acres north of Mill Lane and west of Fortune Green Lane.
Bracknell Way, NW3:   Bracknell Way is a small alleyway, usable only by pedestrians
Cedars:   A local West Hampstead builder, Thomas Potter, constructed Cedars in 1878.
Cholmley Lodge:   Cholmley Lodge, a two storeyed stuccoed house, was built in 1813.
Cock and Hoop:   The Cock and Hoop Inn was standing on the corner of West End Lane and Fortune Green Road by 1723.
Flitcroft Estate:   Flitcroft was a 50 acre estate at Fortune Green and West End, named after its owner in the 18th century.
Fortune Green:   Fortune Green was originally part of the district of Hampstead but became physically separated from it by the building of the new turnpike road (now Finchley Road) in the 1830s.
Fortune Green:   Fortune Green lies to the north of the ancient village of West End.
Hillfield:   By 1644 Hillfield was already mentioned in parish records.
National School:   A National School was established in West End during 1844.
New West End:   New West End was created in the 1840s on the Finchley Road.
Poplar House:   Poplar House was occupied by one of the first developers of West Hampstead, Thomas Potter.
Potter's Iron Foundry:   In the nineteenth century, many West Hampstead people had jobs in Potter’s Iron Foundry.
Ripley House:   Jeremy Jepson Ripley built a house and coach house after 1814, with a large garden north of Lauriston Lodge.
Temple Park:   Temple Park is one of the smaller suburbs of north London.
The Black Lion:   The Old Black Lion was established in 1751 as a beer house.
The Wet Fish Cafe:   The Wet Fish Café is an Art Deco classic at 242 West End Lane.
Thorplands:   Thorplands was an estate south of Mill Lane.
West Cottages, NW6:   Cottages in London NW6.
West End Green:   West End Green is situated on a corner of West End Lane, formerly the location of West End Fair.
West End Hall:   West End Hall (once called New West End Hall) was one of the mansions of West End (West Hampstead).
West Hampstead Police Station:   The Metropolitam Police established itself in West Hampstead during the 1880s.
Woodbine Cottage:   Woodbine Cottage was situated at the south-eastern corner of the Flitcroft estate.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Achilles Road, NW6 · Agamemnon Road, NW6 · Ajax Road, NW6 · Aldred Road, NW6 · Ardwick Road, NW2 · Avenue Mansions, NW3 · Berridge Mews, NW6 · Bracknell Gardens, NW3 · Buckingham Mansions, NW6 · Burgess Hill, NW2 · Burrard Road, NW6 · Cannon Hill, NW6 · Carlton Mews, NW6 · Cholmley Gardens, NW6 · Crediton Hill, NW6 · Croft Way, NW3 · Croftway, NW3 · Fawley Road, NW6 · Ferncroft Avenue, NW3 · Fortune Green Road, NW3 · Fortune Green Road, NW6 · Gondar Gardens, NW6 · Harvard Court, NW6 · Heath Drive, NW3 · Hillfield Road, NW6 · Hollycroft Avenue, NW3 · Holmdale Road, NW6 · Honeybourne Road, NW6 · Ingham Road, NW3 · Ingham Road, NW6 · Inglewood House, NW6 · Inglewood Road, NW6 · Kidderpore Avenue, NW3 · Kidderpore Gardens, NW3 · Lyncroft Gardens, NW6 · Marlborough Mansions, NW6 · Mill Lane, NW6 · Narcissus Road, NW6 · Norman Terrace, NW6 · Orestes Mews, NW6 · Parsifal Road, NW6 · Platts Lane, NW3 · Rose Joan Mews, NW6 · Salmon Mews, NW6 · Studholme Court, NW3 · The Mansions, NW6 · Ulysses Road, NW6 · Weech Road, NW6 · Welbeck Mansions, NW6 ·


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British History Online
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Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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