South Harrow

Underground station, existing between 1903 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
3.231.212.98 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Underground station · South Harrow · HA2 ·
October
19
2017

South Harrow originally spread south and west from the hamlet of Roxeth as a result of easier access from Central London by rail.


Six roads now converge at Roxeth hamlet centre at the bottom of Roxeth Hill. Its areas include, in the west, the geometric garden estate of Shaftesbury Circus/Avenue and in the south, beyond this historic heart, a newly developed shopping area, South Harrow tube station and the locality’s own high street, Northolt Road.

South Harrow succeeded Roxeth and outlying southern fields of Harrow in which that hamlet stood. This was a rural area until the late 19th century with remaining agricultural fields converted to housing by the mid-20th century.

South Harrow station was opened on 28 June 1903 by the District Railway (DR, now the District line) as the terminus of its new extension from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey.

This new extension was, together with the existing tracks back to Acton Town, the first section of the Underground’s surface lines to be electrified and operate electric instead of steam trains. The Deep level tube lines open at that time (City & South London Railway, Waterloo & City Railway and Central London Railway) had been electrically powered from the start.

On 1 March 1910, the DR was extended north to meet the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan line) tracks at Rayners Lane and services commenced over the MR’s tracks to Uxbridge. North of the station the line crosses the Roxeth Marsh; the viaduct over it between South Harrow and Rayners Lane was an engineering feat of the time.

On 4 July 1932, the Piccadilly line was extended to run west of its original terminus at Hammersmith sharing the route with the District line to Ealing Common. From Ealing Common to South Harrow, the District line was replaced by the Piccadilly line. From South Harrow north, an isolated District line service continued to operate to Uxbridge until 22 October 1933 when the Piccadilly line took over the service to Uxbridge.

The original station building is located approximately 170m south of the existing station and can be accessed from South Hill Avenue. It is similar to the building still in use at North Ealing and remains, adjacent to the eastbound platform, in the car park on the north side of the tracks.Today it is used by London Underground as office space for drivers before and after stabling trains in the sidings and driver shift changes.

On 5 July 1935, a new station was opened accessed from Northolt Road. The new station building was designed by Charles Holden as a graduated structure stepping up on each side to the platforms of the high level tracks.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

User unknown/public domain



Lesley carlton
Lesley carlton   
Added: 26 Nov 2017 22:52 GMT   
IP: 81.96.23.80
2:1:26
Post by Lesley carlton: Embry Drive, HA7

I use to live in embry drive when it was an RAF station with my family and I went to Belmont school.cm

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 11 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:2:26
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Charville Lane is an ancient lane of Hayes running east-west.
Charville Lane is an ancient lane of Hayes running east-west.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=14454

VIEW THE SOUTH HARROW AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HARROW AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HARROW AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HARROW AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HARROW AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

South Harrow

South Harrow originally spread south and west from the hamlet of Roxeth as a result of easier access from Central London by rail.

Six roads now converge at Roxeth hamlet centre at the bottom of Roxeth Hill. Its areas include, in the west, the geometric garden estate of Shaftesbury Circus/Avenue and in the south, beyond this historic heart, a newly developed shopping area, South Harrow tube station and the locality’s own high street, Northolt Road.

South Harrow succeeded Roxeth and outlying southern fields of Harrow in which that hamlet stood. This was a rural area until the late 19th century with remaining agricultural fields converted to housing by the mid-20th century.

South Harrow station was opened on 28 June 1903 by the District Railway (DR, now the District line) as the terminus of its new extension from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey.

This new extension was, together with the existing tracks back to Acton Town, the first section of the Underground’s surface lines to be electrified and operate electric instead of steam trains. The Deep level tube lines open at that time (City & South London Railway, Waterloo & City Railway and Central London Railway) had been electrically powered from the start.

On 1 March 1910, the DR was extended north to meet the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan line) tracks at Rayners Lane and services commenced over the MR’s tracks to Uxbridge. North of the station the line crosses the Roxeth Marsh; the viaduct over it between South Harrow and Rayners Lane was an engineering feat of the time.

On 4 July 1932, the Piccadilly line was extended to run west of its original terminus at Hammersmith sharing the route with the District line to Ealing Common. From Ealing Common to South Harrow, the District line was replaced by the Piccadilly line. From South Harrow north, an isolated District line service continued to operate to Uxbridge until 22 October 1933 when the Piccadilly line took over the service to Uxbridge.

The original station building is located approximately 170m south of the existing station and can be accessed from South Hill Avenue. It is similar to the building still in use at North Ealing and remains, adjacent to the eastbound platform, in the car park on the north side of the tracks.Today it is used by London Underground as office space for drivers before and after stabling trains in the sidings and driver shift changes.

On 5 July 1935, a new station was opened accessed from Northolt Road. The new station building was designed by Charles Holden as a graduated structure stepping up on each side to the platforms of the high level tracks.
Print-friendly version of this page