Aldgate Pump

Place of Interest in/near City of London, existing between 1876 and now

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Place of Interest · City of London · EC3M ·
FEBRUARY
15
2018

Aldgate Pump is a historic water pump, located at the junction where Aldgate meets Fenchurch Street and Leadenhall Street.

The Aldgate Pump in 1874.
Credit: Wellcome Images
The pump marks the start of the A11 road towards Norwich and distances to locations in Middlesex, Essex and beyond were measured from here. This contributed to the pump’s status as the symbolic start of the East End of London. The metal wolf head on the pump’s spout is supposed to signify the last wolf shot in the City of London.

Aldgate Pump is a Grade II listed structure. As a well, it was mentioned during the reign of King John. As the City of London developed, it is thought to have been taken down and re-erected at its current location in 1876, as a drinking fountain, as streets were widened.

Served by one of London’s many underground streams, the water was praised for being "bright, sparkling, and cool, and of an agreeable taste". These qualities were later found to be derived from decaying organic matter from adjoining graveyards, and the leaching of calcium from the bones of the dead in many new cemeteries in north London through which the stream ran from Hampstead. Several hundred people died during what became known as the Aldgate Pump Epidemic, and on its relocation in 1876, the New River Company changed the supplies to mains water.

Fenchurch Street railway station was built in 1841 upon the site of Aldgate Pump Court.


Main source: Wikipedia
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The Aldgate Pump in 1874.
Wellcome Images


Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:39 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:1:2812
Post by Jan: Kerbela Street, E2

My grandparents lived in Kerbela Street many years ago when they were terraced houses. My memory of the street is one long street with these strange wrought iron things outside - which I now know as boot scrapers. The house inside was fairly large, but I was a child. Loo was outside. Shame they knocked the terraces down and build a huge housing estate, but that?s progress I suppose. Does anyone know the origin of the name Kerbela?

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 13 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:2:2812
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
St James’s Passage was formerly known as Church Passage.
St James’s Passage was formerly known as Church Passage.

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