Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D

Road in/near Covent Garden, existing between 1886 and now

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Road · Covent Garden · W1D · Contributed by The Underground Map
December
23
2010
Shaftesbury Avenue from Piccadilly Circus in 1949
Credit: Chalmers Butterfield

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.

Shaftesbury Avenue runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster, and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.

Shaftesbury Avenue was built between 1877 and 1886 by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre; although the street’s construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth’s Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened.

It is generally considered the heart of London’s West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen’s theatres clustered together on the west side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, the Shaftesbury Theatre.

The former Saville Theatre is on Shaftesbury Avenue; this became a cinema in 1970, first known as ABC1 and ABC2, and since 2001 as Odeon Covent Garden. Another cinema, the Soho Curzon, is located about halfway along the street.

Between 1899 and 1902, no. 67 Shaftesbury Avenue was the location of the Bartitsu School of Arms and Physical Culture, which is the first commercial Asian martial arts training school in the Western world.

Shaftesbury Avenue is also a boundary of London’s Chinatown. The number of Chinese businesses on the street has been on the increase.

In the evening, street artists gather on the pavement outside the HQ of ICE - International Currency Exchange and Raphaels Bank (previously the home of Natwest) at the Piccadilly Circus end of Shaftesbury Avenue, and produce portraits for the tourists.

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ADD A STORY TO SHAFTESBURY AVENUE
VIEW THE COVENT GARDEN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE COVENT GARDEN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE COVENT GARDEN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE COVENT GARDEN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE COVENT GARDEN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Leicester Square

Leicester Square, while indeed a square, is also the name for a tube station.

Leicester Square tube station, on the Northern and Piccadilly lines, is located on Charing Cross Road, a short distance to the east of Leicester Square itself.

On early Tube plans, the station was listed as Cranbourn Street, but the present name was used when the station was first opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906. Offices above the red terracotta station building on the east side of Charing Cross Road - designed by Leslie Green - was in its early years also occupied by the publishers of the Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack and an image of cricket stumps appears above a doorway. On all four platforms, film sprockets are painted down the entire length and on the top and bottom of the display area (blue on the Piccadilly line platforms, and black on the Northern line platforms), due to the four premiere cinemas in Leicester Square. The station is featured briefly during the introductory video sequence of the sixth Harry Potter film.

OTHER UNDERGROUND MAP LOCATIONS NEAR HERE
Babmaes Street · Bainbridge Street · Bainbridge Street · Bear Street · Berners Street · Bloomsbury Street · Brewer Street · Buses outside the National Gallery · Cambridge Circus · Carlisle Walk · Catherine Street · Cecil Court · Clare Market · Covent Garden · Coventry Street · Cranbourn Street · Endell Street · Evelyn Yard · Fashion Retail Academy · Flaxman Court · Flichcroft Street · Garrick Yard · Goslett Yard · Great Russell Street · Great Windmill Street · Greek Court · Greek Street · Haymarket · Hobhouse Court · Hopkins Street · Horse and Dolphin Yard · Hospital Home and Education Units co St Mary’s Hospitial Tuition Unit · Irving Street · Kemp’s Court · Leicester Square · Leicester Square · Les Cousins · London Hippodrome · Manette Street · Maple Leaf Walk · May’s Court · New Oxford Street · Newport Court · Northumberland House · Old Compton Street · On This Day in London: 2 November · Orange Street · Orange Street · Oxendon Street · Pall Mall East · Piccadilly Circus · Piccadilly Circus · Piccadilly Theatre · Piccadilly · Rathbone Place · Royal Opera House · Rupert Court · Rupert Street · Russell Street · Saint Giles High Street · Saint James’s Square · Saint Martin’s Lane · Saint Martin’s Court · Saint Martin’s Place · Shaftesbury Avenue · Shelton Street · Soho · Soho Parish CofE Primary School · Sounding Alley · St Anne’s Court · St Giles · St Josephs Catholic Primary School · Suffolk Place · The Gallery · The Royal Ballet School · Thomas Neal’s shopping centre · Tottenham Court Road · Tottenham Court Road (1927) · Trafalgar Square · Upper Saint Martin’s Lane · Upper St Martin’s Lane · Walker’s Court · Wardour Mews · Wardour Street · West End Children’s Centre · Wild Street (1902) · Wilder Walk · Wyld’s Great Globe ·
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Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Cruchley's New Plan of London (1848) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cruchley's New Plan of London Shewing all the new and intended improvements to the Present Time. - Cruchley's Superior Map of London, with references to upwards of 500 Streets, Squares, Public Places & C. improved to 1848: with a compendium of all Place of Public Amusements also shewing the Railways & Stations.
G. F. Cruchley

Cary's New And Accurate Plan of London and Westminster (1818) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cary's map provides a detailed view of London. With print date of 1 January 1818, Cary's map has 27 panels arranged in 3 rows of 9 panels, each measuring approximately 6 1/2 by 10 5/8 inches. The complete map measures 32 1/8 by 59 1/2 inches. Digitising this map has involved aligning the panels into one contiguous map.
John Cary

John Rocque Map of London (1762) FREE DOWNLOAD
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers central London at a reduced level of detail compared with his 1745-6 map.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1843) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured.
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Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1836) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Insets: A view of the Tower from London Bridge -- A view of London from Copenhagen Fields. Includes views of facades of 25 structures "A comparison of the principal buildings of London."
Chapman and Hall, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
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London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
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The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
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Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
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Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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