Westbourne Lodge

Image dated 1857

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Photo taken in a westerly direction · Royal Oak · W2 ·
JUNE
22
2015

Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.

This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests. The house was built before the railway was built but, at the time of the weeding, ran just beside the Lodge. During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.
This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests.

The house was built before the railway was built but, at the time of the weeding, ran just beside the Lodge.

During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.

Comparing the 1857 photo with the 1900 map, you can clearly see the conservatory featured on the map.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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This photo from 6 August 1857 shows guests at the wedding of the Reverend Frederick Manners Stopford to Florence Augusta Saunders, daughter of Charles Saunders, first general secretary of the Great Western Railway. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was amongst the guests. The house was built before the railway was built but, at the time of the weeding, ran just beside the Lodge. During the wedding, both Brunel and Saunders were able to experience trains running beside the wedding party along the railway which they had built.
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Royal Oak

Royal Oak is a station on the Hammersmith and City Line, between Westbourne Park and Paddington stations, and is the least used station on the Hammersmith and City line.

The station opened 30 October 1871 although the Metropolitan Railway extension to Hammersmith had opened in 1864.

It is close to the elevated Westway section of the A40 road. The station is named after a nearby public house, The Royal Oak (later The Railway Tap and now The Porchester). It is one of a number of Underground stations named after a local pub.

Royal Oak Portal is the Western tunnel entrance for the Crossrail scheme to link East and West London by main-line railway. The station itself is not part of the Crossrail scheme.
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