St Georges Fields

Cemetery/graveyard in/near Marble Arch, existed between 1763 and 1967

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Cemetery/graveyard · Marble Arch · W2 ·
November
7
2017

St George’s Fields are a former burial ground of St George’s, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road.

St George’s Fields was a burial ground from 1763, and later used for archery, games and as allotments. Nearby is Archery Close.

The land was owned by St George’s Church in Hanover Square, which sold it to developers in 1967 who left a few tombstones, adding character to the gardens. The Utopian Housing Association, the developers, were a housing trust.

The architects, Design 5, used a ziggurat style of building, retaining much of the open space whilst creating 300 dwellings. Parts of the double walls surrounding the burial ground - reputedly designed to frustrate grave robbers - have been preserved along with a number of tombstones.

The estate is now in private ownership although the grounds of St George’s Fields are opened to the public once a year under the London Garden Square Scheme and one of London’s oldest plane trees, with a girth of over 5 metres, may be seen set amongst the other trees.

Although the buildings on the estate are not listed they have been included within the Bayswater Road Conservation Area established by the City of Westminster to preserve the amenities of this historic area.


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Marble Arch

Marble Arch station was opened on 30 July 1900 by the Central London Railway.

Like all the original stations on the CLR, Marble Arch was served by lifts to the platforms but the station was reconstructed in the early 1930s to accommodate escalators. This saw the closure of the original station building, designed by the architect Harry Bell Measures, that was situated on the corner of Quebec Street and Oxford Street, and a replacement sub-surface ticket hall opened further to the west. The new arrangements came into use on 15 August 1932. The original surface building was later demolished.

The platforms, originally lined in plain white tiles, were refitted with decorative vitreous enamel panels in 1985. The panel graphics were designed by Annabel Grey.

The station was modernised in 2010 resulting in new finishes in all areas of the station, apart from the retention of various of the decorative enamel panels at platform level.
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