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3.215.182.36 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Rail station · Abbey Road · E15 ·
August
8
2019

Not a zebra crossing in sight.

Docklands Light Railway
Abbey Road DLR station is built on the original route of the Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway which opened between Stratford and Canning Town stations in 1846. The line became part of what is now known as the North London Line in 1979. The Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway had four tracks over this section of route. The western pair were redeveloped as part of an extension to the London Underground’s Jubilee Line in 1999 and the eastern pair, which carried the North London Line service, were cut back at Stratford in 2006. The tracks were converted for use as part of the Docklands Light Railway.

The area between Canning Town and Stratford has been identified for major regeneration and new development as part of the Lower Lea Valley. The street that it serves is named after the nearby Stratford Langthorne Abbey.

The station is nowhere near the other, better-known Abbey Road of Beatles fame, with the celebrated zebra crossing near St John’s Wood tube station. Signs directing travellers to the right station are posted, complete with references to The Beatles’ hits.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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Docklands Light Railway
User unknown/public domain

THE STREETS OF ABBEY ROAD
Abbey Road, E15 Abbey Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Bakers Row, E15 Bakers Row is a road in the E15 postcode area
Greenway Gate, E15 Greenway Gate is a road in the E15 postcode area
Greenway Link, E15 Greenway Link is a road in the E15 postcode area
Greenway, E15 Greenway is a road in the E15 postcode area
Pond Road, E15 Pond Road is a road in the E15 postcode area



Brian Bigwood
Brian Bigwood   
Added: 27 Mar 2018 14:53 GMT   
IP: 79.73.72.51
2:1:307
Post by Brian Bigwood: Odessa Street, SE16

My mother Doris Bigwood and her family lived in Odessa Street until they were bombed out and moved to Sidcup. My grandfather worked as lighterman in the local docks and was named Walter Edward Bigwood. I believe there were 13 children and their motherâ??s surname was Hunt.
I would love to know if anyone is related or even knew the family. If so, please get in touch.

Sandy Tarrant
Sandy Tarrant   
Added: 16 Nov 2017 06:03 GMT   
IP: 60.225.230.107
2:2:307
Post by Sandy Tarrant: Monier Road, E3

My grandparents, James Isaac and Mary Ann Johnson ran a grocer’s shop at 122 Monier Road, Bow from the early 1900s to about 1935 or so.

Dawn Greene
Dawn Greene    
Added: 24 Aug 2017 13:08 GMT   
IP: 90.192.14.114
2:3:307
My dads family lived here in 1911 maybe before still checking that out the name was Emily Gladding lived at 22 Emily Street then she married George Cassilllo y

VIEW THE ABBEY ROAD AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE ABBEY ROAD AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE ABBEY ROAD AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE ABBEY ROAD AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE ABBEY ROAD AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Abbey Road

Not a zebra crossing in sight.

Abbey Road DLR station is built on the original route of the Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway which opened between Stratford and Canning Town stations in 1846. The line became part of what is now known as the North London Line in 1979. The Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway had four tracks over this section of route. The western pair were redeveloped as part of an extension to the London Underground’s Jubilee Line in 1999 and the eastern pair, which carried the North London Line service, were cut back at Stratford in 2006. The tracks were converted for use as part of the Docklands Light Railway.

The area between Canning Town and Stratford has been identified for major regeneration and new development as part of the Lower Lea Valley. The street that it serves is named after the nearby Stratford Langthorne Abbey.

The station is nowhere near the other, better-known Abbey Road of Beatles fame, with the celebrated zebra crossing near St John’s Wood tube station. Signs directing travellers to the right station are posted, complete with references to The Beatles’ hits.
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