Victoria Park

Park in/near South Hackney, existing between 1846 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
3.94.129.211 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Park · South Hackney · E9 ·
APRIL
20
2019

Victoria Park is a large open space that stretches out across part of the East End.

Victoria Park
The park was laid out by notable London planner and architect Sir James Pennethorne between 1842 and 1846. Reminiscent of Regent’s Park - the latter was designed by Pennethorne’s teacher, John Nash - it is considered as the finest park in East London. It is bounded on two sides by branches of the Regent’s Canal.

Two alcoves - the only two surviving fragments of the old London Bridge demolished in 1831 - are located at the east end of the park where they were placed in 1860. Alcoves such as these would have been important for pedestrian safety - the roadway was very narrow and the risk of being run down very high.

Victoria Park’s reputation as the ’People’s Park’ grew as it became a centre for political meetings and rallies. The biggest crowds were usually drawn to ’star’ socialist speakers such as William Morris and Annie Besant. The tradition of public speaking in the park continued until well after the second world war, and was still later reflected in politically oriented rock concerts, such as those held by Rock Against Racism and the Anti-Nazi League in the 1980s.

During the Second World War, Victoria Park was largely closed to the public and effectively became one huge Ack-Ack (anti-aircraft) site, also including a POW camp for, at first, Italian, then German prisoners. The gun emplacements straddled the path of German bombers looping northwest after attacking the docks and warehouses further south in what is now Tower Hamlets.

The Victoria Model Steam Boat Club, founded in the park on 15 July 1904, is still active today and holds Sunday regattas. The first Regatta is traditionally held on Easter Sunday and the Steam Regatta is always held on the first Sunday in July.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

Victoria Park
User unknown/public domain


Sandy Tarrant
Sandy Tarrant   
Added: 16 Nov 2017 06:03 GMT   
IP: 60.225.230.107
2:1:3183
Post by Sandy Tarrant: Monier Road, E3

My grandparents, James Isaac and Mary Ann Johnson ran a grocer’s shop at 122 Monier Road, Bow from the early 1900s to about 1935 or so.

VIEW THE SOUTH HACKNEY AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HACKNEY AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HACKNEY AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HACKNEY AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SOUTH HACKNEY AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Alice Lane, E3

Alice Lane is a road in the E3 postcode area


Print-friendly version of this page