Arsenal

Underground station, existing between 1906 and now

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Underground station · Arsenal · N5 ·
APRIL
20
2018

Arsenal tube station is a Piccadilly Line station. Meanwhile, Arsenal is maybe a football club too...

Gillespie Road tiling
Arsenal tube station is a Piccadilly Line station. Originally known as Gillespie Road, it was renamed in 1932 after Arsenal Football Club, who at the time played at the nearby Arsenal Stadium. It is the only Tube station named directly after a football club.

Arsenal tube station was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) as Gillespie Road on 15 December 1906. The GNP&BR later renamed the Piccadilly line after the consolidation & nationalisation of the Tube network as London Underground. The original station building and ticket hall were red terracotta-clad buildings designed by Leslie Green, similar to neighbouring Holloway Road and Caledonian Road stations.

At the time of Gillespie Road’s construction, it served a residential area and a local divinity college. In 1913, Arsenal Football Club moved to Highbury on the site of the college’s playing fields, and the club’s presence there eventually led to a campaign for a change of name. Arsenal manager Herbert Chapman was a particularly keen advocate, and on 5 November 1932 it was renamed Arsenal (Highbury Hill). The station was expanded in the 1930s, with the original station building demolished and being replaced with a wider building of a more modern design.

The (Highbury Hill) suffix was dropped from the station’s name some time around 1960, giving the current name of Arsenal. The original tiled walls of the platforms still bear the Gillespie Road name, spelt out in large letters.

The station is in a narrow Victorian residential street: when built, the station building was squeezed incongruously between residential properties on each side, occupying the width of just two terraced houses. Even after the surface building was rebuilt in the early 1930s and widened, with a further house being demolished, it has one of the narrowest frontages of any underground station. It is also unusual in not having any bus routes pass its entrance.

Arsenal possesses neither escalators nor lifts. Instead, a sloping passageway leads down to the platforms. This is due to the combination of the tunnels being both relatively shallow at this point and being some distance from the station entrance (being underneath the East Coast Main Line). Due to short flights of stairs at both ends of the passageway the station is not wheelchair accessible. When the station was rebuilt in the early 1930s an extra tunnel was dug to platform level from the main access passage in anticipation of increased traffic, which is now used to handle the large crowds on match days. The station has a "tidal" system unique on the Underground network, with a narrow section on one side divided from the main passageway by a full-height fence. The narrow section is used on match days for the lighter flow, according to time of day - for passengers catching trains before matches, or leaving the station afterwards.

Although Arsenal’s Highbury Stadium closed in 2006, the station retains its name and is still used by spectators attending matches at Arsenal’s new Emirates Stadium, but it is otherwise quieter than other stations on the same stretch of line.


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Gillespie Road tiling
User unknown/public domain

THE STREETS OF ARSENAL
Elfort Road, N5 Elfort Road is a road in the N5 postcode area
Queensland Road, N7 Queensland Road is one of the streets of London in the N7 postal area.
Stadium Crescent West, E15 Stadium Crescent West is a road in the E15 postcode area
Steve Biko Road, N7 Steve Biko Road is a road in the N7 postcode area
Tannington Terrace, N5 Tannington Terrace is a road in the N5 postcode area



Glenn Clark
Glenn Clark   
Added: 12 Feb 2018 22:08 GMT   
IP: 86.136.40.237
2:1:32
Post by Glenn Clark: Burghley Road, N8

Lived with my parents at number 18 from 1963 to 1981, briefly moved back for a while but moved on in 1987. Remember riding my scooter in the 60?s and in my soap box that my grandad made, he lived at number 27 from after WW1 till 1976. Great days playing football against the wall on the corner of Burghley Rd and Lyttleton Rd with my mates from the adjoining road. Now live in North Norfolk but often think back to Hornsey and Stationers Company School.

Andreas Christou
Andreas Christou   
Added: 20 Sep 2017 07:39 GMT   
IP: 31.49.79.224
2:2:32
Post by Andreas Christou: Woodlands Park Road, N15

I need to know the year and month I have moved at 83 woodlands park road


Janet Creed (need Burke)
Janet Creed (need Burke)   
Added: 31 Aug 2017 14:46 GMT   
IP: 80.43.191.89
2:3:32
Post by Janet Creed (need Burke): Campbell Road, N4

My father was William Burke, 74 Campbell road n4 my mother was May wright of Campbell road, I was born on 13.02.1953, we stayed with my grandparents in Campbell Road, William and Maggie Wright.

VIEW THE ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE ARSENAL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Arsenal

Arsenal tube station is a Piccadilly Line station. Meanwhile, Arsenal is maybe a football club too...

Arsenal tube station is a Piccadilly Line station. Originally known as Gillespie Road, it was renamed in 1932 after Arsenal Football Club, who at the time played at the nearby Arsenal Stadium. It is the only Tube station named directly after a football club.

Arsenal tube station was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) as Gillespie Road on 15 December 1906. The GNP&BR later renamed the Piccadilly line after the consolidation & nationalisation of the Tube network as London Underground. The original station building and ticket hall were red terracotta-clad buildings designed by Leslie Green, similar to neighbouring Holloway Road and Caledonian Road stations.

At the time of Gillespie Road’s construction, it served a residential area and a local divinity college. In 1913, Arsenal Football Club moved to Highbury on the site of the college’s playing fields, and the club’s presence there eventually led to a campaign for a change of name. Arsenal manager Herbert Chapman was a particularly keen advocate, and on 5 November 1932 it was renamed Arsenal (Highbury Hill). The station was expanded in the 1930s, with the original station building demolished and being replaced with a wider building of a more modern design.

The (Highbury Hill) suffix was dropped from the station’s name some time around 1960, giving the current name of Arsenal. The original tiled walls of the platforms still bear the Gillespie Road name, spelt out in large letters.

The station is in a narrow Victorian residential street: when built, the station building was squeezed incongruously between residential properties on each side, occupying the width of just two terraced houses. Even after the surface building was rebuilt in the early 1930s and widened, with a further house being demolished, it has one of the narrowest frontages of any underground station. It is also unusual in not having any bus routes pass its entrance.

Arsenal possesses neither escalators nor lifts. Instead, a sloping passageway leads down to the platforms. This is due to the combination of the tunnels being both relatively shallow at this point and being some distance from the station entrance (being underneath the East Coast Main Line). Due to short flights of stairs at both ends of the passageway the station is not wheelchair accessible. When the station was rebuilt in the early 1930s an extra tunnel was dug to platform level from the main access passage in anticipation of increased traffic, which is now used to handle the large crowds on match days. The station has a "tidal" system unique on the Underground network, with a narrow section on one side divided from the main passageway by a full-height fence. The narrow section is used on match days for the lighter flow, according to time of day - for passengers catching trains before matches, or leaving the station afterwards.

Although Arsenal’s Highbury Stadium closed in 2006, the station retains its name and is still used by spectators attending matches at Arsenal’s new Emirates Stadium, but it is otherwise quieter than other stations on the same stretch of line.
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