Walmer Road, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between 1760 and now

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Road · Notting Hill · W11 · Contributed by The Underground Map
December
11
2015


Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.

No addresses have so far been added to Walmer Road, W11

Walmer Road started as an established footpath called Greene’s Lane and appears as such on the 1800 map of the area. It connected the Uxbridge Road (Holland Park Avenue) with one of the only buildings north of this turnpike road - Notting Barns Farm.

The soil was ideal for brickmaking and brickfields moved into the area in the first decades of the nineteenth century. Once hollowed out, these easily flooded.

Beside one such flooded brickfield, the settlement of Notting Dale was established. the main street of the small settlement, part of Greene’s Lane, became called James Street.

The manufacture of pottery appears to have been established here before 1827 by Ralph Adams (fn. 8) of Gray’s Inn Road, brick- and tilemaker, who between 1826 and 1831 was the building lessee for most of the houses in Holland Park Avenue between Ladbroke Grove and Portland Road, the earth for the bricks having been no doubt dug from the Potteries area. The ratebooks first refer to this locality as ’the Potteries’ in 1833. The tithe map of 1844 shows what appears to be a kiln on the east side of Pottery Lane near the present No. 34. The only kiln shown on the Ordnance Survey map surveyed in 1863 is that which still stands on the east side of Walmer Road opposite to Avondale Park.

James Street was renamed Walmer Road sometime in the 1850s. St. Andrew’s, was built at the corner of Walmer and Lancaster Roads in 1862.

Cholera was a constant companion. The only covered sewer in the area extended along the modern Walmer Road, but at too high a level to provide drainage for the houses there. The only possible outfall was to the main Counter’s Creek sewer, some 1,300 feet to the westward, and by September 1849 the building of a sewer was in progress.

There were improvements in other directions. As early as 1853 Mary Bayly had formed a Mothers’ Society in the Potteries, for the education of its members in the elements of hygiene, and between 1858 and 1863 the first makeshift schools in the area were replaced by permanent buildingsóa ragged school, built under Lord Shaftesbury’s auspices, in Penzance Street in 1858, and St. James’s National Schools in Penzance Place in 1863. St. John’s Church was building a school on the west side of Walmer Road in 1861.

The streets were paved - Walmer Road was extending north - and taken over by the Vestry. By 1863 ’the Ocean’ (the flooded brickworks) had at last been filled in. Avondale Park was created in 1892 out of ’the Ocean’. This was part of a general clean-up of the area which had become known as the Potteries and Piggeries.

Despite the continued presence of pigs, a Dr Godrich felt able in 1869 to report that ’the Potteries are in a more cleanly and healthy condition, principally owing to the improved drainage afforded by the Metropolitan Board of Works’.

This part of Notting Dale was designated in Charles Booth’s 1902 survey as amongst London’s poorest and was long been perceived by Kensington Council as a blot on the local landscape.

By mid century it was characterised as the centre of the infamous race riots of 1958, the horrific murders in nearby Rillington Place a couple of years earlier, along with a more recent shotgun killing in Walmer Road. Its houses were in poor repair without inside sanitation or hot water.

The West Cross Route was first mooted in the 1950s as part of a projected vital major arterial road into central London from the west. The main artery was to be a four lane dual carriageway extension of the A40 beginning where the Westway met Wood Lane and ending by merging into the start of the Marylebone Road in Paddington. The road would be elevated to carry it above existing buildings so as to keep demolition of such property to a minimum. This objective was generally achieved throughout its four mile length through the capital except in the area of Notting Dale around Walmer Road which was to be the site of an access point along its route.

A new roundabout sited below the new road was necessary to facilitate vehicular access. As this roundabout was below the road a huge demolition programme was required to accommodate it which would decimate a large and densely populated part of Notting Dale completely destroying the community resident there. The roundabout was sited broadly in a square area bounded by Oldham Road to the west, Silchester Mews to the east, Walmer Road to the north and Silchester Road to the south. All these roads would disappear at least in part along with sections of Blechydon Street whilst Calverley Street, situated between Oldham Road and Silchester Mews, Silchester Terrace and Latimer Mews would disappear completely. Walmer Road was somewhat unique in that only the south side (nos 2-128) was to be demolished along with part of the north side (nos 3-49 and 103-121) leaving isolated in the middle almost an island of three blocks of the north side (nos 51-101) which would remain quite literally in the shadow of the elevated dual carriageway above.

Kensington Council viewed the construction of the West Cross Route as an ideal moment for some opportunist slum clearance though how much thought was given at the time to the fate of its occupants is extremely debatable. It may be worth noting that at this roundabout an exit was planned (and built and the spur still exists today) for a further dual carriageway to strike out northeastward to join the foot of the M1. This plan was by contrast floored by objections from residents of the adjoining St Quintins Estate and others.


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Maria Russ
Maria Russ   
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Post by Maria Russ: Middle Row Bus Garage

My mum worked as a Clippie out from Middle Row Bus Garage and was conductress to George Marsh Driver. They travel the City and out to Ruislip and Acton duiring the 1950ís and 1960ís. We moved to Langley and she joined Windsor Bus Garage and was on the Greenline buses after that. It was a real family of workers from Middle Row and it formed a part of my early years in London. I now live in New Zealand, but have happy memories of the early years of London Transport and Middle Row Garage. Still have mumís bus badge. Happy times they were.
Julia elsdon
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Post by Julia elsdon: Shirland Mews, W9

I didnít come from Shirland Mews, but stayed there when my father was visiting friends, sometime in the mid to late forties. As I was only a very young child I donít remember too much. I seem to think there were the old stables or garages with the living accommodation above. My Mother came from Malvern Road which I think was near Shirland Mews. I remember a little old shop which had a "milk cow outside". So I was told, it was attached to the front of the shop and you put some money in and the milk would be dispensed into your container. Not too sure if it was still in use then. Just wonder if anyone else remembers it.yz5
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Post by LDNnews: Shepherds Bush Market
Shepherd’s Bush Hosts Feast of Christmas Entertainment
With festive music, top comedy and children’s storytelling sessions

http://www.shepherdsbushw12.com/default.asp?section=info&page=sbchristmas2017.htm
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Post by LDNnews: Ladbroke Grove
Thousands Enjoy King Street’s First Ever Christmas Market
With over 100 stalls along traffic free road and day of family entertainment

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Post by LDNnews: Shepherds Bush Market
Christmas at Brook Green Market and Kitchen
Stock on seasonal food and enjoy the festivities over next two Saturdays

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Post by LDNnews: Hammersmith
Christmas Comes to Askew Road on Tuesday
All welcome to enjoy the festive fun on Starch Green from 3.30pm

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Latymer Upper Head Pays Tribute to Colleague Cath Hopley
After sudden death of Hammersmith school’s much loved biology teacher

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Lyric’s Jack and the Beanstalk is a Rock ’n’ Roll Panto for All Ages
It’s bursting with energy, utterly bonkers and great fun, aays Penny Flood

http://www.shepherdsbushw12.com/default.asp?section=info&link=http://neighbournet.com/server/common/revlyric009.htm
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Post by LDNnews: Ladbroke Grove
Londoners Hand in 350 Firearms in Two Weeks
Police chiefs ’delighted’ with public response during gun surrender

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Post by LDNnews: Latimer Road
Tibetan Filmmaker Visits Shepherd’s Bush Library
Celebrate Tibetan culture with Nawang N Anjatsang on Wednesday

http://www.shepherdsbushw12.com/default.asp?section=info&link=http://neighbournet.com/server/common/hflibraries033.htm
VIEW THE NOTTING HILL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE NOTTING HILL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
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VIEW THE NOTTING HILL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
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VIEW THE NOTTING HILL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
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VIEW THE NOTTING HILL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Acklam Road Adventure Playground:   Acklam Road Adventure Playground was created in the 1960s.
All Saints Church:   All Saints church was designed by the Victorian Gothic revival pioneer William White, who was also a mountaineer, Swedish gymnastics enthusiast and anti-shaving campaigner.
Basing Street (SARM) Studios:   SARM Studios is a recording studio, established by Chris Blackwell, the founder of Island Records.
Earl of Zetland:   A pub in the Potteries
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple):   In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Kenilworth Castle:   The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Kensington Hippodrome:   The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Kensington Park Hotel:   The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Grove:   Ladbroke Grove is a road in the North Kensington/Notting Hill. Running from Notting Hill itself in the south to Kensal Green in the north, it straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Ladbroke Square Garden:   Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Luxurious sewers:   The effluent society
Mary Place Workhouse:   Notting Dale Workhouse stood on the site of what is now Avondale Park Gardens,
Mercury Theatre:   The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
North Kensington Library:   North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of Londonís finest public libraries.
Notting Dale:   From Pigs and bricks to Posh and Becks...
Notting Hill:   Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...
Notting Hill in Bygone Days:   Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Chenesitun and Knotting Barns:   Chapter 1 of the book "Notting Hill in Bygone Days" by Florence Gladstone (1924)
St Johnís Hill:   St Johnís Hill is the highest point in the area.
St Johnís, Notting Hill:   St Johnís Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
The Apollo:   The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road:   From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
The Brittania:   The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11.
The Crown:   The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.
The Tabernacle:   The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square built in 1887 as a church.
Western Iron Works:   The Western Iron Works was the foundry business of James Bartle and Co.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Albert Hotel (1900s):   The Albert Hotel, on the corner of All Saints Road and Cornwall Road (now Westbourne Park Road).
Bangor Street:   2015
Bangor Street:   2015
Corner of Bangor and Sirdar Road:   2015
Political meeting (1920s):   Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Ridler's Tyre Yard:   Ridler's Tyres was situated in a part of Blechynden Street which no longer exists


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Adair Road Garages, W10 · Addison Avenue, W11 · Alba Place, W11 · All Saints Road, W11 · Ansleigh Place, W11 · Ariel Way, W12 · Arundel Gardens, W11 · Avondale Park Gardens, W11 · Avondale Park Road, W11 · Bangor Street, W11 · Bartle Road, W11 · Basing Street, W11 · Blechynden Mews, W11 · Blenheim Crescent, W11 · Bomore Road, W11 · Bridge Close, W10 · Bulmer Mews, W11 · Cambridge Gardens, W10 · Camelford Walk, W11 · Campden Hill Place, W11 · Chepstow Crescent, W11 · Chepstow Villas, W11 · Clarendon Cross, W11 · Clarendon Road, W11 · Clarendon Works, W11 · Clydesdale Road, W11 · Codrington Mews, W11 · Colville Gardens, W11 · Colville Mews, W11 · Colville Road, W11 · Colville Square, W11 · Colville Terrace, W11 · Colville Terrace, W11 · Convent Gardens, W11 · Cornwall Crescent, W11 · Dale Row, W11 · Darnley Terrace, W11 · Denbigh Close, W11 · Denbigh Road, W11 · Denbigh Terrace, W11 · Dulford Street, W11 · Elgin Crescent, W11 · Elgin Mews, W11 · Evesham Street, W11 · Folly Mews, W11 · Fowell Street, W10 · Freston Road, W11 · Golden Mews, W11 · Gorham Place, W11 · Grenfell Road, W11 · Grenfell Tower, W11 · Grenfell Walk, W11 · Haydenís Place, W11 · Haydenís Place, W11 · Hedgegate Court, W11 · Hippodrome Mews, W11 · Hippodrome Place, W11 · Holland Park Avenue, W11 · Holland Road, W11 · Horbury Crescent, W11 · Horbury Mews, W11 · Hunt Close, W11 · Kenley Street, W11 · Kenley Walk, W11 · Kensington Park Gardens, W11 · Kensington Park Mews, W11 · Kensington Park Road, W11 · Kingsdale Gardens, W11 · Kingsdown Close, W10 · Ladbroke Crescent, W11 · Ladbroke Gardens, W11 · Ladbroke Grove, W11 · Ladbroke Road, W11 · Ladbroke Square, W11 · Ladbroke Terrace, W11 · Ladbroke Walk, W11 · Lambton Place, W11 · Lancaster Road, W11 · Lansdowne Crescent, W11 · Lansdowne Cresent, W11 · Lansdowne Rise, W11 · Lansdowne Road, W11 · Lansdowne Walk, W11 · Ledbury Mews North, W11 · Ledbury Road, W11 · Lidbury Road, NW7 · Lonsdale Road, W11 · Lorne Gardens, W11 · Mary Place, W11 · Maxilla Gardens, W10 · Maxilla Gardens, W10 · Mcgregor Road, W11 · Mortimer Square, W11 · Needham Road, W11 · Norland Road, W11 · Norland Square, W11 · Olaf Street, W11 · Pembridge Crescent, W11 · Pembridge Gardens, W2 · Pembridge Mews, W11 · Pembridge Road, W11 · Pembridge Villas, W11 · Pencombe Mews, W11 · Penzance Place, W11 · Portland Gate, SW7 · Portland Road, W11 · Portobello Green, W10 · Portobello Road, W11 · Pottery Lane, W11 · Powis Gardens, W11 · Powis Mews, W11 · Powis Square, W11 · Powis Terrace, W11 · Princedale Road, W11 · Princes Place, W11 · Queensdale Crecent, W11 · Queensdale Crescent, W11 · Queensdale Place, W11 · Queensdale Road, W11 · Queensdale Walk, W11 · Railway Arches, W10 · Rifle Place, W11 · Rillington Place, W11 · Rosehart Mews, W11 · Rosmead Road, W11 · Royal Crescent Mews, W11 · Royal Crescent, W11 · Royal Cresent Mews, W11 · Runcorn Place, W11 · Ruston Mews, W11 · Scampston Mews, W10 · Silchester Road, W10 · Silvester Mews, W11 · Simon Close, W11 · Sirdar Road, W11 · St Andrews Square, W11 · St Anns Road, W11 · St Anns Villas, W11 · St James Gardens, W11 · St James’s Gardens, W11 · St Jamesís Gardens, W11 · St Johnís Mews, W11 · St Lukes Mews, W11 · St Lukeís Mews, W11 · St Lukeís Road, W11 · St Marks Close, SE10 · St Marks Road, W11 · St Markís Close, W11 · St Markís Place, W11 · St. Anns Road, W11 · St. Johns Gardens, W11 · St. Johnís Gardens, W11 · St. Markís Road, W11 · Stanley Crescent, W11 · Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 · Stanley Gardens, W11 · Station Walk, W10 · Station Walk, W11 · Stoneleigh Place, W11 · Stoneleigh Street, W11 · Swanscombe House, W11 · Swanscombe Road, W11 · Talbot Road, W11 · Tavistock Crescent, W11 · Tavistock Mews, W11 · Tavistock Road, W11 · Testerton Walk, W11 · Treadgold Street, W11 · Trinity Mews, W10 · Verity Close, W11 · Vernon Yard, W11 · Walmer Road, W11 · Wellington Close, W11 · Wesley Square, W11 · West Cross Route, W11 · Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 · Westbourne Grove, W11 · Westway Roundabout, W10 · Westway, W10 · Whitchurch Road, W11 · Wilby Mews, W11 · Wilsham Street, W11 · Wilsham Street, W11 · Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3 ·


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Links

Old Notting Hill/North Ken History
Facebook group, covering the history of W10 and W11.
RBKC Library Time Machine
Blog from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Library
North Kensington Histories
Recollections of people from North Kensington, London
Ladbroke Grove
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Shepherdís Bush
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White City
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Wood Lane
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Holland Park
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Westbourne Park
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Latimer Road
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Born in W10
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The Notting Hill & North Kensington Photo Archive
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Maps


Inner West London (1932) FREE DOWNLOAD
1930s map covering East Acton, Holland Park, Kensington, Notting Hill, Olympia, Shepherds Bush and Westbourne Park,
George Philip & Son, Ltd./London Geographical Society, 1932

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

John Rocque Map of Ealing and Acton (1762)
John Rocque (c. 1709Ė1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot ťmigrťs. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers an area from Greenford in the northwest to Hammersmith in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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