Street cricket (1953)

Image dated 1940

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Photo taken in a southwesterly direction · Kennington · SE11 ·
October
6
2017

Street cricket has been played across London since the rules of the game were formulated.

Street cricket in Montford Place near the Oval 1953
Montford Place is a street near to the Oval cricket ground in Kennington and children in the area have long been fonder of the game than in other areas of London. This photo was taken in 1953.

In street cricket, there is no real rule book. Tennis balls are often used because it is lighter. A dustbin, empty crates, broom sticks or canes serve as stumps at the batsman's end while a piece of brick or a pipe serves as the stumps at the bowler's end. When they are no stumps, the players assume the stumps to be at an imaginary height (usually above the waist level of the batsman). This leads to many arguments as to whether the ball would have hit the stumps or not had the stumps been there for real.

The size of the road or traffic does not hinder the progress of a game; children often wait for the traffic to clear before playing consecutive deliveries.

A very important rule that is almost always used in street cricket is one pitch catch or pitch catch. This rule declares the batsman as out if a fielder catches the ball after it has pitched once after the batsman hits it. One pitch could mean bouncing off the ground/wall/tree etc. This rule typically puts the batsman at tremendous disadvantage/pressure. So, many times this rule is tweaked to one pitch one hand. This means that the fielder has to use only one hand in catching a ball after it has bounced once; if the fielder uses both hands to catch a ball after it has pitched once, then the batsman is declared not out. In London, this rule is often known as one hand, one bounce.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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Street cricket in Montford Place near the Oval 1953
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Christobel Warren-Jones
Christobel Warren-Jones   
Added: 26 Feb 2018 13:50 GMT   
IP: 143.159.49.39
2:1:3257
Post by Christobel Warren-Jones: Hurley Road, SE11

Hurley Road was off Kennington Lane, just west of Renfrew Raod, not where indicated on this map. My Dad was born at number 4 in 1912. It no longer exists but the name is remembered in Hurley House, Hurley Clinic and Hurley Pre-School

KC Alexander
KC Alexander   
Added: 23 Jan 2018 15:07 GMT   
IP: 90.195.148.140
2:2:3257
Post by KC Alexander: Priory Grove, SW8

Lived in a two up two down until the age of 13.
Played on the bombsites (no health and safety then)
A Coal man Mr Bells lived in the road and kept his horse in a stable across the road from where he lived.
Fibre glass factory which made large figures etc for fairgrounds was down a mews which no longer exists.
Prefabs on the bend where Doreen, a friend of my mums lived with her two daughters.
Alan and Alex who?s mum and dad were also friends of my parents lived near the priory pub. the pub is now residential flats.
Alex was another boy who lived just a couple of doors along from me as was Colin.
The house was knocked down in 1964 and the site is now an adventure playground.
The only thing left I recognise is my old sycamore tree which grew in my garden which I could often be found climbing.

Never fell out of it !

Allen Waters
Allen Waters   
Added: 18 Jan 2018 23:19 GMT   
IP: 151.224.33.53
2:3:3257
Post by Allen Waters: Lansdowne Gardens, SW8

I used to live at no. 27 from 1950-1961. My family had the large room on the ground floor a bedroom on the 2nd floor and a room in the attic. There were several other families who came and went over the years, as well as landlords. We had a landlord for a time called ?Gethin?. I used to play with my friends in the road as there were few cars then. We used to use the lamppost next to house as a cricket wicket and it?s still there. I can remember swings in the green and a parkeeper there with a coal brazier in the winter. I was a choirboy at St Barnaby?s, I remember a bagwash near the church when the houses were demolished to build the estate. There used to be a row of shops and I particularly remember one called ?gallies? a sweet shop where you could get a penny drink and they put gas in it for you. Schools I went to were Priory Grove, then Al

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Evelyn Johnson
Evelyn Johnson   
Added: 8 Dec 2017 23:23 GMT   
IP: 70.53.91.62
2:4:3257
Post by Evelyn Johnson: Sturgeon Road, SE17

I lived at 105 Sturgeon Road in 1956 went to st Paul’s church Lorrimore sqN8DvL

Pauline jones
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   
IP: 86.136.68.202
2:5:3257
Post by Pauline jones: Bessborough Place, SW1V

I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved L

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Johnshort
Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   
IP: 10.9.55.126
2:6:3257
Post by Johnshort: Hurley Road, SE11

There were stables in the road mid way also Danny reading had coal delivery lorry.n

peter hiller
peter hiller   
Added: 13 Sep 2017 11:07 GMT   
IP: 81.141.12.149
2:7:3257
Post by peter hiller: Sancroft Street, SE11

what is the history of tresco house 2 sancroft street ,it looks older than a 1990s site

Robert smitherman
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   
IP: 2.220.194.137
2:8:3257
Post by Robert smitherman: Saunders Street, SE11

I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

VIEW THE KENNINGTON AREA IN THE 1750s
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Kennington

Kennington was a royal manor in the ancient parish of St Mary, Lambeth in the county of Surrey and was the administrative centre of the parish from 1853.

The presence of a tumulus, and other significant geographical features locally, suggest that the area was regarded in ancient times as a sacred place of assembly. The manor of Kennington was divided from the manor of Vauxhall by the River Effra, a tributary of the River Thames. A smaller river, the River Neckinger, ran through the northern part of Kennington, approximately where Brook Drive is today. Both rivers have now been diverted into underground culverts.

Harthacnut, King of Denmark and England, died at Kennington in 1041. Harold Godwinson took the Crown the day after the death of Edward the Confessor at Kennington; he is said to have placed it upon his own head. King Henry III held his court here in 1231; and, according to Matthew Paris, in 1232, Parliament was held at Kennington.

Edward III gave the manor of Kennington to his oldest son Edward, the Black Prince in 1337, and the prince then built a large royal palace in the traingle formed by Kennington Lane, Sancroft Street and Cardigan Street, near to Kennington Cross. Geoffrey Chaucer was employed at Kennington as Clerk of Works in 1389 and was paid 2 shillings. The Duchy of Cornwall still maintains a substantial property portfolio within the area.

The eighteenth century saw considerable development in Kennington. At the start of the century, the area was essentially a village on the southern roads into London, with a common on which public executions took place. The development of Kennington came about through access to London, which happened when, in 1750, Westminster Bridge was constructed. In 1751, Kennington Road was built from Kennington Common (as it then was; now Kennington Park) to Westminster Bridge. Houses along it were soon built.

On 10 May 1768, at approximately the site of the Imperial War Museum today, the Massacre of St George's Fields took place. A riot started, because of the detention at the King's Bench Prison of the radical, John Wilkes – he had written an article in which he attacked King George III. The Riot Act was read, and soldiers fired into the crowd, killing seven people.

By the 1770s, the development of Kennington into its modern form was well underway. Terraces of houses were built on the east side of Kennington Road and Cleaver Square (then called Prince's Square) was laid out in 1788. In 1796, a house in West Square became the first station in the optical telegraph, or semaphore line, between the Admiralty in London, and Chatham and Deal in Kent, and during the Napoleonic Wars transmitted messages between Whitehall and the Royal Navy.

The modern street pattern of Kennington was formed by the early nineteenth century. The village had become a semi-rural suburb with grand terraced houses. In 1852, at the initiative of the minister of St. Mark's Church, the Common was enclosed and became the first public park in south London.

The Oval cricket ground was leased to Surrey County Cricket Club from the Duchy of Cornwall in 1845, and the adjacent gasometers (themselves an international sporting landmark) were constructed in 1853. Proximity to central London was key to the development of the area as a residential suburb and it was incorporated into the metropolitan area of London in 1855.

Dense building and the carving-up of large houses for multiple occupation caused Kennington to be very seriously over-populated in 1859, when diphtheria appeared (recorded by Karl Marx in 'Das Kapital').

Kennington station was opened as Kennington (New Street) in 1890 by the City of London and Southwark Subway.

On 15 October 1940, the large trench air-raid shelter beneath Kennington Park was struck by a 50lb bomb. The number of people killed remains unknown; it is believed by local historians that 104 people died. 48 bodies were recovered.

Lambeth Council designated much of Kennington a Conservation Area in 1968, the boundary of which was extended in 1979 and in 1997. Lambeth Council's emphasis on conserving and protecting Kennington's architectural heritage and enhancing its attractive open spaces for recreation and leisure is illustrated by restoration of the centre of the listed Cleaver Square in the last decade of the twentieth century.
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