Sellon’s Farm

Farm in/near Harlesden, existing until 1900

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Farm · Harlesden · NW10 · Contributed by The Underground Map
Sellon's Farm

To the east of Harlesden, there were still several farms, Elmwood, Haycroft, Upper Roundwood, and Sellon’s until the late 1890s.

Sellon’s Farm stood at the current location of the point where Springwell Avenue meets Park Parade.

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Vallie Webster
Vallie Webster   
Added: 16 Mar 2018 03:39 GMT   
Expires: 15 Apr 2018 03:39 GMT   
Post by Vallie Webster: Tunis Road, W12

I visited my grandmother who lived on Tunis Road from Canada in approximately 1967-68. I remember the Rag and Bone man who came down the road with a horse and milk delivered to the door with cream on the top. I also remember having to use an outhouse in the back of the row house. No indoor plumbing. We had to have a bath in a big metal tub (like a horse trough) in the middle of the kitchen filled with boiled water on the stove. Very different from Canada. My moms madin name was Hardcastle. Interesting to see the maps. Google maps also brings the world closer.
Gwen Nelson
Gwen Nelson   
Added: 4 Mar 2018 14:01 GMT   
Expires: 3 Apr 2018 14:01 GMT   
Post by Gwen Nelson: Hazlewood Tower, W10

Post by IleanaSat is spam. Has nothing to do with Hazelwood Tower
Norman Norrington
Norman Norrington   
Added: 19 Jan 2018 14:49 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Norman Norrington: Blechynden Street, W10

In the photo of Blechynden St on the right hand side the young man in the doorway could be me. That is the doorway of 40 Blechynden St.

I lived there with My Mum Eileen and Dad Bert and Brothers Ron & Peter. I was Born in Du Cane Rd Hosp. Now Hammersmith Hosp.

Left there with my Wife Margaret and Daughter Helen and moved to Stevenage. Mum and Dad are sadly gone.

I now live on my own in Bedfordshire, Ron in Willesden and Pete in Hayling Island.

Have many happy memories of the area and go back 3/4 times a year now 75 but it pulls back me still.
Paul Shepherd
Paul Shepherd   
Added: 16 Jan 2018 15:21 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Paul Shepherd: Chamberlayne Road, NW10

i lived in Rainham Rd in the 1960?s. my best friends were John McCollough and Rosalind Beevor. it was a good time to be there but local schools were not good and i got out before it went to a real slum. i gather it?s ok now.
BRIAN WYBROW Ph.D. (Lond.)   
Added: 27 Dec 2017 14:48 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by BRIAN WYBROW Ph.D. (Lond.): Maxilla Gardens, W10

I lived at 11A Maxilla Gardens W10 (now partly gone, but what is left is called Maxilla Walk).
I have provided an account of life in Maxilla gardens on the following website; so, to avoid repetition, please visit this link:

Best wishes to all.

Mary Harris
Mary Harris   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 17:12 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

Message truncated Show whole message
Maria Russ
Maria Russ   
Added: 7 Dec 2017 09:46 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Maria Russ: Middle Row Bus Garage

My mum worked as a Clippie out from Middle Row Bus Garage and was conductress to George Marsh Driver. They travel the City and out to Ruislip and Acton duiring the 1950’s and 1960’s. We moved to Langley and she joined Windsor Bus Garage and was on the Greenline buses after that. It was a real family of workers from Middle Row and it formed a part of my early years in London. I now live in New Zealand, but have happy memories of the early years of London Transport and Middle Row Garage.
Still have mum’s bus badge.

Happy times they were.
John Dye
John Dye   
Added: 1 Dec 2017 14:50 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by John Dye: Cool Oak Lane, NW9

I lived at Queensbury Road, Kingsbury during World War II and used to play regularly along the edge of the Welsh Harp. About halfway along Cool Oak Lane on the south side was a pond we used to call Froggy Pond. It was the only place I ever saw a water scorpion, Nepa cinerea.
At the end of the war, all the street air raid shelters were knocked down and the rubble was piled up on the ground south of the Cool Oak Lane bridge, on the Hendon side. I remember that this heap of rubble became infested with rats and I used to watch them from the bridge. I was told that an old house on the south side of Cool Oak Lane (Woodfield House?) was once owned by the wife of Horatio Nelson. I think it later became the nurseries for plants grown for the Hendon parks.
Julia elsdon
Julia elsdon   
Added: 22 Nov 2017 18:19 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Julia elsdon: Shirland Mews, W9

I didn’t come from Shirland Mews, but stayed there when my father was visiting friends, sometime in the mid to late forties. As I was only a very young child I don’t remember too much. I seem to think there were the old stables or garages with the living accommodation above. My Mother came from Malvern Road which I think was near Shirland Mews. I remember a little old shop which had a "milk cow outside". So I was told, it was attached to the front of the shop and you put some money in and the milk would be dispensed into your container. Not too sure if it was still in use then. Just wonder if anyone else remembers it.yz5
Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton
Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 22:50 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton: Netherwood Street, NW6

I was born at 63netherwood street.need to know who else lived there.i think I moved out because of a fire but not sure
David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 3 Oct 2017 13:29 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by David Jones-Parry: Tavistock Crescent, W11

I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them questions asked.A very happy boyhood ,from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.
Debbie hobbs
Debbie hobbs    
Added: 19 Sep 2017 09:08 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Debbie hobbs : Raymede Street, W10

Susan Wright
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Susan Wright: Bramley Mews, W10

My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.
David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by David Jones-Parry: Mcgregor Road, W11

I lived at 25 Mc Gregor Rd from 1938 my birth until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957.Our house sided onto Ridgeways Laundry All Saints Rd. I had a happy boyhood living there
Patricia Neafsey
Patricia Neafsey   
Added: 4 Sep 2017 15:55 GMT   
Expires: 3 Feb 2271 10:02 GMT   
Post by Patricia Neafsey: Fishers Lane, W4

My ancestors (Dady) lived in Myrtle Cottage, Fishers Lane in 1900 or so. Do you have any information? Was it associated with a manor house?
Added: 24 Mar 2018 21:20 GMT   
Expires: 7 Apr 2018 21:20 GMT   
Post by LDNnews: Chiswick Park
'March For Our Lives': Gun control activists gather in London and Edinburgh in solidarity with Florida high school massacre victims
Hundreds of protesters have gathered outside the US embassy in London to demand an end to mass shootings, pledging to "stay angry" until gun laws are reformed.
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.


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Harlesden - reggae capital of London

In the 19th century, Harlesden, then a rural village, began to develop some of its urban appearance with the arrival of the railways. Willesden Junction, Kensal Green and Harlesden station stations all had an effect on the developing village. Cottages for railway and industrial workers were built, as was grander housing for the local middle class. To the east of Harlesden, there were still several farms, Elmwood, Haycroft, Upper Roundwood, and Sellon's until the late 1890s.

Harlesden was at the height of its prosperity at the turn of the 20th century. Largely middle-class, it had a strong sense of identity compounded largely of civic pride and religious nonconformity. Nine churches and chapels were built between 1876 and 1902 as were a court house, a library, a constitutional clubhouse, and a jubilee clock, the focus of High Street. Willesden Hippodrome, a large music hall, opened in 1907. Much of High Street, a major shopping centre, was rebuilt in the Edwardian period.

Mainly after World War I, one of Europe's biggest industrial estates was constructed at nearby Park Royal, and large factories there included McVitie & Price (later United Biscuits) from 1910, and Heinz from 1919.

The image of Harlesden today began to take shape in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Continued immigration from Ireland and new immigration from the Caribbean, the Indian sub-continent and Africa changed the racial and cultural make up of the area. More recently the area has now become home to Brazilian and Portuguese communities. Much of the housing is made up of Victorian terraces which have been attracting young professionals unable to afford similar properties in nearby Kensal Green and Queen's Park.

Harlesden station is both a London Underground and Overground station and a railway station. The railway line at this point forms the border of the Harlesden residential area and the Park Royal industrial estate. The first station at the site was called Willesden and opened in 1841 by the London and Birmingham Railway and closed in 1866, replaced by Willesden Junction station, half a mile to the south-east. A new station called Harlesden , opened on 15 June 1912. Bakerloo line services on the same tracks began on 16 April 1917, via a new junction at Queens Park station.

Harlesden:   Harlesden - reggae capital of London
Haycroft Farm:   Haycroft Farm stood on Harlesden Road.
Roundwood Farm:   Roundwood Farm lay between Willesden and Harlesden.
Roundwood Park:   Roundwood Park is a public park in Willesden, London, measuring a total of 10.27 hectares.

Sellon's Farm (garden):   Sellon's Farm, Harlesden from the rear.

Acton Lane, NW10 · Ancona Road, NW10 · Avenue Road, NW10 · Bank Buildings, NW10 · Bolton Road, NW10 · Bramston Road, NW10 · Buckingham Mews, NW10 · Buckingham Road, NW10 · Burns Road, NW10 · Cardinal Hinsley Close, NW10 · Chadwick Road, NW10 · Challenge Close, NW10 · Charlton Road, NW10 · Clifton Road, NW10 · Crownhill Road, NW10 · Dairy Close, NW10 · Design Works Rucklidge Avenue, NW10 · Drayton Road, NW10 · Fawcett Road, NW10 · Fry Road, NW10 · Harlesden Gardens, NW10 · Harlesden High Street, NW10 · High Street Harlesden, NW10 · High Street, NW10 · High Streetharlesdonbrent, NW10 · Honeywood Road, NW10 · Leghorn Road, NW10 · Longstone Avenue, NW10 · Manor Parade, NW10 · Manor Park Road, NW10 · Manor Park Works, NW10 · Maple Walk, SM2 · Nightingale Road, NW10 · Odessa Road, NW10 · Palermo Road, NW10 · Park Parade, NW10 · Radcliffe Avenue, NW10 · Ranelagh Road, NW10 · Ridley Road, NW10 · Rucklidge Avenue, NW10 · Saint John’s Avenue, NW10 · Sellons Avenue, NW10 · Spezia Road, NW10 · Springwell Avenue, NW10 · St Johns Avenue, NW10 · St Marys Road, NW10 · Tavistock Road, NW10 · The Croft, NW10 · Tubbs Road, NW10 · Wendover Road, NW10 ·

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Born in Willesden
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British History Online
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Time Out
Listings magazine


Land ownership in Willesden (1823) FREE DOWNLOAD
Map of land ownership in the Willesden area in 1823
City of London Corporation

John Rocque Map of Wembley, Kingsbury, Willesden and Harlesden (1762)
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers an area from Harrow in the northwest to Harlesden in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

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