Sands End

Neighbourhood in/near Fulham, existing until now

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Neighbourhood · Fulham · SW6 ·
APRIL
14
2018

Sands End was a close knit working class community.


Once a rural backwater called Sandy End, it became the industrial heart of Fulham with its gas works, power station and petrol depot providing work for generations of local families.

A property boom beginning in the 1970s coupled with the advent of oil fueled processing of North Sea oil led to an inexorable process of gentrification with offices and studio businesses and flats on the market for more than £2.4 million.

On the bank of the Thames is Hurlingham Retail Park, which includes Currys and PC World. There is also a business enterprise centre in the Sulivan district. Across the other side of Townmead Road there is a large Sainsbury’s, and Imperial Wharf, a brownfield development of the former Imperial Gasworks which is growing to include a mixture of affordable housing, both private and public, shops, a park and a new railway station.


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Gerry m lee
Gerry m lee   
Added: 10 Feb 2018 17:39 GMT   
IP: 50.64.178.175
2:1:3279
Post by Gerry m lee: Stormont Road, SW4

I lived iin 6 Stormont Road Lavender Hill Battersea from 1939 to 1964. My mother was a widow. I have one brother. The rent in 1939 would have been ten shillings a week. If ant one reads this, I now live in Vancouver Canada and my e-mail address is gerry-lee@shaw.ca and I went on line to try and find out what 6 Stormont sold for when it was built. The houses Nos. 6 4 8 12 etc to the corner where Marney Road starts were in my opinion protected during the war years, by a very large spiral church next door but one to number 4 and I am no religious. I went to school from five years old to Wix?s Lane. If this is read, please send a reply, and thank you.


Mary Harris
Mary Harris   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 17:12 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:2:3279
Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

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LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 8 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:3:3279
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The bridge over the Westbourne at Sloane Square was called Blandel Bridge and was later renamed Grosvenor Bridge.
The bridge over the Westbourne at Sloane Square was called Blandel Bridge and was later renamed Grosvenor Bridge.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=37052

VIEW THE FULHAM AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE FULHAM AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE FULHAM AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE FULHAM AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE FULHAM AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Fulham

Fulham is an area of southwest London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, SW6 (the successor to the Metropolitan Borough of Fulham) located nearly four miles south west of Charing Cross.

Fulham lies on the north bank of the Thames, between Putney and Chelsea. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. It was formerly the seat of the diocese of Fulham and Gibraltar, and Fulham Palace served as the former official home of the Bishop of London (now a museum), the grounds of which are now divided between public allotments and an elegant botanical garden.

The area is home to the Fulham Football Club stadium Craven Cottage and the Chelsea Football Club stadium Stamford Bridge and the various flats and entertainment centres built into it.

Famously exclusive sports club, the Hurlingham Club, is also located within Fulham. With members having included British monarchs, the waiting list for membership currently averages over fifteen years.

Fulham Broadway has undergone considerable pedestrianisation and is home to a number of cafes, bars and salons.

Fulham has several parks and open spaces of which Bishop's Park, Fulham Palace Gardens, Hurlingham Park, South Park, Eel Brook Common and Parsons Green are the largest. Many of the residential roads in Fulham are tree-lined, in some cases by houses painted in different pastel shades.

Fulham has appeared in a number of films, including The Omen and The L-Shaped Room. Fulham Broadway tube station was used in Sliding Doors.

Fulham is home to several schools, including independent pre-preparatory and preparatory schools.
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