Wilkinson Way, W4

Road is in an area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before. Mainly Edwardian housing

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
3.215.182.36 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Road · Chiswick · W4 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Wilkinson Way is a street in Chiswick.



xxx

User unknown/public domain


 

Chiswick

Chiswick: Cheese Farm.

Chiswick is a large suburb of west London. It contains Hogarth's House, the former residence of the 18th century English artist William Hogarth; Chiswick House, a neo-Palladian villa regarded as one of the finest in England; and Fuller's Brewery, London's largest and oldest brewery.

Chiswick is located on a meander of the River Thames which is heavily used for competitive and recreational rowing, and Chiswick itself is home to several clubs. The finishing post for the Boat Race is just downstream of Chiswick Bridge.

The area was historically an ancient parish in the county of Middlesex, with an agrarian and fishing economy. Having good communications with London from an early time Chiswick became a popular country retreat, and as part of the suburban growth of London in the late 19th and early 20th centuries the population significantly expanded. It became the Municipal Borough of Brentford and Chiswick in 1932 and has formed part of Greater London since 1965.

Chiswick was first recorded c.1000 as Ceswican; the name Chiswick is of Old English origin meaning 'Cheese Farm' and originates from the riverside meadows and farms that are thought to have supported an annual cheese fair on Dukes Meadows up until the 18th century.

Chiswick grew up as a fishing village around St Nicholas church on Church Street. The parish included Strand-on-the-Green, Little Sutton and Turnham Green. By the early nineteenth century the fishing industry in and around Chiswick was declining as the growth of industry and the invention of the flush toilet were causing pollution in the river. Fish began to die out and the river became unsuitable as a spawning ground. Locks upstream also made the river impassable by migratory fish such as salmon and shad. From the 18th century onwards the High Road became built up with inns and large houses.

The population of Chiswick grew almost tenfold during the 19th century, reaching 30,000 in 1901, and the area is a mixture of Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian housing. Suburban building began in Gunnersbury in the 1860s and in Bedford Park, on the borders of Chiswick and Acton, in 1875.

The first V-2 rocket to hit London fell on Chiswick on 8 September 1944, killing three people, injuring 22 others and causing extensive damage to surrounding trees and buildings. Six houses were demolished by the rocket and many more suffered damage. There is a memorial where the rocket fell on Staveley Road. There is also a War Memorial at the east end of Turnham Green.
Print-friendly version of this page