Vauxhall Gardens

Gardens in/near Vauxhall, existing until 1859

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
35.170.81.210 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Gardens · Vauxhall · SE11 ·
August
24
2016

Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.

A General Prospect of Vaux Hall Gardens
Credit: Samuel Wale
Originally known as New Spring Gardens, the site was believed to have opened before the Restoration of 1660 with the first mention being made by Samuel Pepys in 1662.

The Gardens consisted of several acres of trees and shrubs with attractive walks. Initially, entrance was free with food and drink being sold to support the venture.

The site became Vauxhall Gardens in 1785 and admission was charged to gain its many attractions. The Gardens drew all manner of men and supported enormous crowds, with its paths being noted for romantic assignations. Tightrope walkers, hot air balloon ascents, concerts and fireworks provided amusement. The rococo Turkish tent became one of the Gardens' structures, the interior of the Rotunda became one of Vauxhall's most viewed attractions, and the chinoiserie style was a feature of several buildings.

Enormous crowds could be accommodated. In 1749 a rehearsal of Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks attracted an audience of 12,000, and in 1786 a fancy dress jubilee to celebrate the proprietor's long ownership was thronged with 61,000 revellers. Many of the best known musicians and singers of the day performed at the Gardens, for example Sophia Baddeley. In 1732, their fashionable status was confirmed by a fancy dress ball attended by Frederick, Prince of Wales. At that time access from the West End was by water, but the opening of Westminster Bridge in the 1740s made access easier though less charming.

A statue depicting George Frederic Handel was erected in the Gardens, which later found its way to Westminster Abbey. In 1817, the Battle of Waterloo was re-enacted with 1000 soldiers participating.

Vauxhall was closed in 1840 after its owners suffered bankruptcy, but re-opened in 1841. It changed hands in 1842, and was permanently closed in 1859. Vauxhall Gardens was located in Kennington on the south bank of the River Thames, which was not part of the built-up area of the metropolis until towards the end of the Gardens' existence. Part of the site is now a small public park called Spring Gardens.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

A General Prospect of Vaux Hall Gardens
Samuel Wale


Christobel Warren-Jones
Christobel Warren-Jones   
Added: 26 Feb 2018 13:50 GMT   
IP: 143.159.49.39
2:1:3318
Post by Christobel Warren-Jones: Hurley Road, SE11

Hurley Road was off Kennington Lane, just west of Renfrew Raod, not where indicated on this map. My Dad was born at number 4 in 1912. It no longer exists but the name is remembered in Hurley House, Hurley Clinic and Hurley Pre-School

KC Alexander
KC Alexander   
Added: 23 Jan 2018 15:07 GMT   
IP: 90.195.148.140
2:2:3318
Post by KC Alexander: Priory Grove, SW8

Lived in a two up two down until the age of 13.
Played on the bombsites (no health and safety then)
A Coal man Mr Bells lived in the road and kept his horse in a stable across the road from where he lived.
Fibre glass factory which made large figures etc for fairgrounds was down a mews which no longer exists.
Prefabs on the bend where Doreen, a friend of my mums lived with her two daughters.
Alan and Alex who?s mum and dad were also friends of my parents lived near the priory pub. the pub is now residential flats.
Alex was another boy who lived just a couple of doors along from me as was Colin.
The house was knocked down in 1964 and the site is now an adventure playground.
The only thing left I recognise is my old sycamore tree which grew in my garden which I could often be found climbing.

Never fell out of it !

Allen Waters
Allen Waters   
Added: 18 Jan 2018 23:19 GMT   
IP: 151.224.33.53
2:3:3318
Post by Allen Waters: Lansdowne Gardens, SW8

I used to live at no. 27 from 1950-1961. My family had the large room on the ground floor a bedroom on the 2nd floor and a room in the attic. There were several other families who came and went over the years, as well as landlords. We had a landlord for a time called ?Gethin?. I used to play with my friends in the road as there were few cars then. We used to use the lamppost next to house as a cricket wicket and it?s still there. I can remember swings in the green and a parkeeper there with a coal brazier in the winter. I was a choirboy at St Barnaby?s, I remember a bagwash near the church when the houses were demolished to build the estate. There used to be a row of shops and I particularly remember one called ?gallies? a sweet shop where you could get a penny drink and they put gas in it for you. Schools I went to were Priory Grove, then Al

Message truncated Show whole message

Pauline jones
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   
IP: 86.136.68.202
2:4:3318
Post by Pauline jones: Bessborough Place, SW1V

I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved L

Message truncated Show whole message

Johnshort
Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   
IP: 10.9.55.126
2:5:3318
Post by Johnshort: Hurley Road, SE11

There were stables in the road mid way also Danny reading had coal delivery lorry.n

peter hiller
peter hiller   
Added: 13 Sep 2017 11:07 GMT   
IP: 81.141.12.149
2:6:3318
Post by peter hiller: Sancroft Street, SE11

what is the history of tresco house 2 sancroft street ,it looks older than a 1990s site

Robert smitherman
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   
IP: 2.220.194.137
2:7:3318
Post by Robert smitherman: Saunders Street, SE11

I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 7 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:8:3318
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=3318

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 26 Nov 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:9:3318
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The Angel Inn, Highgate.
The Angel Inn, Highgate.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=3141

VIEW THE VAUXHALL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE VAUXHALL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE VAUXHALL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE VAUXHALL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE VAUXHALL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 Read blog
We have featured this location on a blog entry.
Please note that our blog will open in a new window.

Vauxhall

Vauxhall is an inner city area of Central London in the London Borough of Lambeth.

It is generally accepted that the etymology of Vauxhall is from the name of Falkes de Breauté, the head of King John's mercenaries, who owned a large house in the area, which was referred to as Faulke's Hall, later Foxhall, and eventually Vauxhall.

There is no mention of Vauxhall in the 1086 Domesday Book. The area formed part of the extensive Manor of South Lambeth. From various accounts three local roads, the South Lambeth Road, Clapham Road (previously called Merton Road) and Wandsworth Road (previously called Kingston Road) were ancient and well known routes to and from London. The area was flat and marshy with parts poorly drained by ditches. The area only started to be developed in the mid 18th century. Prior to this it provided market garden produce for the nearby City of London.

The area only became generally known by this name when the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens opened as a public attraction. Initially most visitors would have approached by river, but crowds of Londoners of all classes came to know the area after the construction of Westminster Bridge in the 1740s.

There are competing theories as to why the Russian word for a central railway station is vokzal, which coincides with the 19th-century transliteration of Vauxhall. It has long been suggested that a Russian delegation visited the area to inspect the construction of the London and South Western Railway in 1840, and mistook the name of the station for the generic name of the building type. The locality of the L&SWR's original railway terminus, Nine Elms Station, was shown boldly and simply as Vauxhall in the 1841 Bradshaw timetable.

Another likely explanation is that the first Russian railway, constructed in 1837, ran from Saint Petersburg via Tsarskoye Selo to Pavlovsk Palace, where extensive Pleasure Gardens had earlier been established. In 1838 a music and entertainment pavilion was constructed at the railway terminus. This pavilion was called the Vokzal in homage to the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens in London. The name soon came to be applied to the station itself, which was the gateway that most visitors used to enter the gardens. It later came to mean any substantial railway station building.

It has also given its name to the Vauxhall Motors car manufacturer, which originated in the area.

Vauxhall station was opened by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) as 'Vauxhall Bridge Station' on 11 July 1848 when the main line was extended from Nine Elms to Waterloo, then 'Waterloo Bridge Station'. It is on a viaduct with eight platforms. The deep tube London Underground station is on the Victoria line, and opened on 23 July 1971.

Vauxhall was located next to a major creamery and milk bottling plant for United Dairies. Milk trains from all over the West Country would stop at Clapham Junction in the evening, and reduce their length by half so that they did not block Vauxhall station while unloading. They would then proceed to Vauxhall, and pull into the down side platform, where a discharge pipe was provided to the creamery on the other side of the road. There was also pedestrian access from below the station, under the road to the depot, in the tunnel where the pipeline ran. Unloaded trains would then proceed to Waterloo, where they would reverse and return to Clapham Junction to pick up the other half of the train. The procedure was then repeated, so that the entire milk train was unloaded between the end of evening peak traffic and the start of the following morning.
Print-friendly version of this page