Shadwell

Rail station, existing between 1876 and now

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Rail station · Shadwell · E1 ·
MARCH
28
2014

Shadwell is a district in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, and located on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping and Ratcliff.

Shadwell Basin Bridge (2006).
Credit: Fin Fahey
In the 13th century, the area was known as Scadflet and Shatfliet – derived from the Anglo-Saxon fleot, meaning a shallow creek or bay – the land was a low lying marsh, until drained (by order of Act of Parliament, after 1587) by Cornelius Vanderdelf. A spring, issuing from near the south wall of the churchyard was dedicated to St Chad, and filled a nearby well. The origin of the name is therefore confused, being associated with both the earlier use and the later well.

In the 17th century, Thomas Neale became a local landowner, and built a mill and established a waterworks on large ponds, left by the draining of the marsh. The area had been virtually uninhabited and he developed the waterfront, with houses behind as a speculation. Shadwell became a maritime hamlet with roperies, tanneries, breweries, wharves, smiths, and numerous taverns, built around the chapel of St Paul's. Seventy-five sea captains are buried in its churchyard; Captain James Cook had his son baptised there.

By the mid-eighteenth century, Shadwell Spa was established, producing sulphurous waters, in Sun Tavern fields. As well as medicinal purposes, salts were extracted from the waters; and used by local calicoprinters to fix their dyes.

In the 19th century, Shadwell was home to a large community of foreign South Asian lascar seamen, brought over from British India by the East India Company. There were also Anglo-Indians, from intermarriage and cohabitation between lascar seamen and local girls. There were also smaller communities of Chinese and Greek seamen, who also intermarried and cohabited with locals.

The modern area is dominated by the enclosed former dock, Shadwell Basin, whose construction destroyed much of the earlier settlement – by this time degenerated into slums. The basin once formed the eastern entrance to the then London Docks, with a channel leading west to St Katharine Docks. It is actually two dock basins - the south basin was constructed in 1828-32 and the north basin in 1854-8.

Unlike nearby Limehouse Basin, few craft larger than canoes can be seen on Shadwell Basin, which is largely used for fishing and watersports - and as a scenic backdrop to the modern residential developments that line it. The basin, however, is still connected to the Thames and the channel is spanned by a bascule bridge.

The original Shadwell station was one of the oldest on the network, and was built over a spring. First opened by the East London Railway on 10 April 1876, it was first served by the Metropolitan District Railway and Metropolitan Railway on 1 October 1884. It was renamed Shadwell & St. George-in-the-East on 1 July 1900 but reverted to its original name in 1918. In 1983, a new ticket hall was built on Cable Street, replacing the original building in Watney Street.

Shadwell DLR station opened on 31 August 1987 as part of the first tranche of DLR stations. Initially designed for one-car DLR trains, Shadwell's platform underwent extension to two-car operation in 1991. The station underwent further refurbishment in 2009, which extended the platforms to accommodate three-car trains, revamped the station entrance at ground level, and added an emergency exit at the east end of the platforms.

Shadwell station closed on 22 December 2007, reopened on 27 April 2010 for a preview service to New Cross and New Cross Gate, and from 23 May 2010, the latter service extended to West Croydon / Crystal Palace operated within the London Overground network.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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Shadwell Basin Bridge (2006).
Fin Fahey

THE STREETS OF SHADWELL
Agatha Close, E1W Agatha Close is a road in the E1W postcode area
Anthony Street, E1 Anthony Street previously ran from Commercial Road through to Cable Street. Just a few metres survive.
Ashfield Street, E1 Ashfield Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Benson Quay, E1W Benson Quay is a road in the E1W postcode area
Bigland Street, E1 Bigland Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Boulcott Street, E1 Boulcott Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Brodlove Lane, E1W Brodlove Lane is a road in the E1W postcode area
Burwell Close, E1 Burwell Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Cable Street, E1W Cable Street is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Cannon St Road, E1 Cannon St Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cannon Street Road, E1 Cannon Street Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cavell Street, E1 Cavell Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Chapman Street, E1 Chapman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Choppins Court, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Clavenue Street, E1W A street within the postcode
Clegg Street, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Cobblestone Square, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Deancross Street, E1 Deancross Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Dunch Street, E1 Dunch Street is a street in
East Cross Centre, E15 East Cross Centre is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Elf Row, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Farthing Fields, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Fenton Street, E1 Fenton Street runs south from Commercial Road.
Ford Square, E1 Ford Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Garnet Street, E1W Garnet Street is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Glamis Place, E1W Glamis Place is a road in the E1W postcode area
Glamis Road, E1W Glamis Road is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Glasshouse Fields, E1W Glasshouse Fields is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Hainton Close, E1 Hainton Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Halcrow Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hessel Street, E1 Hessel Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hilliards Court, E1W Hilliards Court is a road in the E1W postcode area
Inglefield Square, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
James Voller Way, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Jane Street, E1 Jane Street is now only a few yards long, with no houses.
Jewel Square, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
John Rennie Walk, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Kinder Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
King Charles Terrace, E1W King Charles Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
King Henry Terrace, E1W King Henry Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Kingsley Mews, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Martha Street, E1 Martha Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Metropolitan Wharf Building, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Metropolitan Wharf, E1W Metropolitan Wharf is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Milk Yard, E1W Milk Yard is a road in the E1W postcode area
Milward Street, E1 Milward Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Monza Street, E1W Monza Street lies south of the Shadwell Basin.
Morris Street, E1 Morris Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Morton Close, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
Nelson Street, E1 Nelson Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Crane Place, E1W New Crane Place is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
New Crane Stairs, E1W New Crane Stairs is a road in the E1W postcode area
New Crane Wharf, E1W New Crane Wharf is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
New Road, E1 New Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Newark Street, E1 Newark Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Newbold Cottages, E1 Newbold Cottages is a road in the E1 postcode area
Newlands Quay, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Pace Place, E1 Pace Place is a road in the E1 postcode area
Peartree Lane, E1W Peartree Lane is a road in the E1W postcode area
Pelican Stairs, E1W Pelican Stairs is a road in the E1W postcode area
Penang Street, E1W Penang Street is a road in the E1W postcode area
Philpot Street, E1 Philpot Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pique Mews, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Princess Court Business Park, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Prospecourt Place, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Prospect Place, E1W Prospect Place is a road in the E1W postcode area
Prusom Street, E1W Prusom Street is a road in the E1W postcode area
Queen Victoria Terrace, E1W Queen Victoria Terrace is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Railway Arches, E1 Railway Arches is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Raine Street, E1W Raine Street is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Rampart Street, E1 Rampart Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Raven Row, E1 Raven Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Richard Street, E1 Richard Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Riverside Mansions, E1W Riverside Mansions is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Rum Close, E1W A street within the E1W postcode
Schoolhouse Lane, E1W Schoolhouse Lane is a road in the E1W postcode area
Shadwell Gardens, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Shadwell Pierhead, E1W Shadwell Pierhead is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Shadwell Place, E1 Shadwell Place is a road in the E1 postcode area
Sidney Square, E1 Sidney Square is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Sly Street, E1 Sly Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Sovereign Close, E1W Sovereign Close is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Spencer Way, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Sutton Street, E1 Sutton Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Tait Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tarling Street, E1 Tarling Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Tillman Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Timberland Road, E1 Timberland Road is a road in the E1 postcode area
Trafalgar Court, E1W Trafalgar Court is one of the streets of London in the E1W postal area.
Turner Street, E1 Turner Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Varden Street, E1 Varden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Walburgh Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Walden Street, E1 Walden Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wapping New Stairs, E1W Wapping New Stairs is a road in the E1W postcode area
Wapping Wall, E1W Wapping Wall runs parallel to the northern bank of the Thames with many converted warehouses facing the river.
Watney Market, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Watney Street, E1 Watney Street is the location for a famed East End street market.
West Gardens, E1W West Gardens is a road in the E1W postcode area
Wine Close, E1W Wine Close is a road in the E1W postcode area



Brian Bigwood
Brian Bigwood   
Added: 27 Mar 2018 14:53 GMT   
IP: 79.73.72.51
2:1:332
Post by Brian Bigwood: Odessa Street, SE16

My mother Doris Bigwood and her family lived in Odessa Street until they were bombed out and moved to Sidcup. My grandfather worked as lighterman in the local docks and was named Walter Edward Bigwood. I believe there were 13 children and their motherâ??s surname was Hunt.
I would love to know if anyone is related or even knew the family. If so, please get in touch.

Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:39 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:2:332
Post by Jan: Kerbela Street, E2

My grandparents lived in Kerbela Street many years ago when they were terraced houses. My memory of the street is one long street with these strange wrought iron things outside - which I now know as boot scrapers. The house inside was fairly large, but I was a child. Loo was outside. Shame they knocked the terraces down and build a huge housing estate, but that?s progress I suppose. Does anyone know the origin of the name Kerbela?

VIEW THE SHADWELL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SHADWELL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SHADWELL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SHADWELL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SHADWELL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Shadwell

Shadwell is a district in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, and located on the north bank of the Thames between Wapping and Ratcliff.

In the 13th century, the area was known as Scadflet and Shatfliet – derived from the Anglo-Saxon fleot, meaning a shallow creek or bay – the land was a low lying marsh, until drained (by order of Act of Parliament, after 1587) by Cornelius Vanderdelf. A spring, issuing from near the south wall of the churchyard was dedicated to St Chad, and filled a nearby well. The origin of the name is therefore confused, being associated with both the earlier use and the later well.

In the 17th century, Thomas Neale became a local landowner, and built a mill and established a waterworks on large ponds, left by the draining of the marsh. The area had been virtually uninhabited and he developed the waterfront, with houses behind as a speculation. Shadwell became a maritime hamlet with roperies, tanneries, breweries, wharves, smiths, and numerous taverns, built around the chapel of St Paul's. Seventy-five sea captains are buried in its churchyard; Captain James Cook had his son baptised there.

By the mid-eighteenth century, Shadwell Spa was established, producing sulphurous waters, in Sun Tavern fields. As well as medicinal purposes, salts were extracted from the waters; and used by local calicoprinters to fix their dyes.

In the 19th century, Shadwell was home to a large community of foreign South Asian lascar seamen, brought over from British India by the East India Company. There were also Anglo-Indians, from intermarriage and cohabitation between lascar seamen and local girls. There were also smaller communities of Chinese and Greek seamen, who also intermarried and cohabited with locals.

The modern area is dominated by the enclosed former dock, Shadwell Basin, whose construction destroyed much of the earlier settlement – by this time degenerated into slums. The basin once formed the eastern entrance to the then London Docks, with a channel leading west to St Katharine Docks. It is actually two dock basins - the south basin was constructed in 1828-32 and the north basin in 1854-8.

Unlike nearby Limehouse Basin, few craft larger than canoes can be seen on Shadwell Basin, which is largely used for fishing and watersports - and as a scenic backdrop to the modern residential developments that line it. The basin, however, is still connected to the Thames and the channel is spanned by a bascule bridge.

The original Shadwell station was one of the oldest on the network, and was built over a spring. First opened by the East London Railway on 10 April 1876, it was first served by the Metropolitan District Railway and Metropolitan Railway on 1 October 1884. It was renamed Shadwell & St. George-in-the-East on 1 July 1900 but reverted to its original name in 1918. In 1983, a new ticket hall was built on Cable Street, replacing the original building in Watney Street.

Shadwell DLR station opened on 31 August 1987 as part of the first tranche of DLR stations. Initially designed for one-car DLR trains, Shadwell's platform underwent extension to two-car operation in 1991. The station underwent further refurbishment in 2009, which extended the platforms to accommodate three-car trains, revamped the station entrance at ground level, and added an emergency exit at the east end of the platforms.

Shadwell station closed on 22 December 2007, reopened on 27 April 2010 for a preview service to New Cross and New Cross Gate, and from 23 May 2010, the latter service extended to West Croydon / Crystal Palace operated within the London Overground network.
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