Woburn Walk, WC1H

Road in/near St Pancras, existing between 1822 and now

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Road · St Pancras · WC1H ·
FEBRUARY
11
2018

Woburn Walk was also known as Woburn Buildings.


It was developed by Thomas Cubitt in 163' target='_top'>1822, and named after the Bedford family seat. Woburn Walk is situated in the north of Bloomsbury, on the north-eastern edge of the Duke of Bedford’s estate.

It was built as a parade of shops with living accommodation above, which it remains today. No. 1 was the home of radical and reformer George Jacob Holyoake; he is listed there in the 163' target='_top'>181629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>911629' target='_top'>634' target='_top'>51 and 163' target='_top'>181629' target='_top'>61 censuses. No. 1629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>911629' target='_top'>634' target='_top'>5 (now part of the Ambassadors Hotel) was the home of W. B. Yeats from 163' target='_top'>181629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>91629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>911629' target='_top'>634' target='_top'>5 to 11629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>911629' target='_top'>632' target='_top'>9, as commemorated by a blue plaque.

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St Pancras

St Pancras railway station, celebrated for its architecture, is built on the site of the St Pancras suburb of London.

For many centuries the St Pancras name was used for various officially-designated areas, but it is now used mainly for the railway station and for upmarket venues in the immediate locality, having been largely superseded by other place names including Kings Cross, Somers Town, and Camden Town, or simply Camden.

St Pancras was originally a medieval parish, which ran from close to what is now Oxford Street north as far as Highgate, and from what is now Regent’s Park in the west to the road now known as York Way in the east, boundaries which take in much of the current London Borough of Camden, including its central part. However, as the choice of name for the borough suggests, St Pancras has lost its status as the central settlement in the area.

The original focus of the area was the church, now known by the retronym of St Pancras Old Church. The building is in the southern half of the parish, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in Great Britain. However, in the 14th century the population moved en masse to Kentish Town, probably due to flooding by the River Fleet and the availability of better wells at the new location. A chapel of ease was established there, and the old settlement was abandoned, except for a few farms, until the growth of London in the late eighteenth century.

In the 1790s Earl Camden began to develop some fields to the north and west of the old church as Camden Town. About the same time, a residential district was built to the south and east of the church, usually known as Somers Town. In 1822 the new church of St Pancras was dedicated as the parish church. The site was chosen on what was then called the New Road, now Euston Road, which had been built as London’s first bypass, the M25 of its day. The two sites are about a kilometer apart. The new church is Grade I listed for its Greek Revival style; the old church was rebuilt in 1847. In the mid 19th century two major railway stations were built to the south of the Old Church, first Kings Cross and later St Pancras. The new church is closer to Euston Station.

By the end of the nineteenth century the ancient parish had been divided into 37 parishes, including one for the old church. There are currently 17 Church of England parishes completely contained within the boundaries of the ancient parish, all of which benefit from the distributions from the St Pancras Lands Trust, and most of which are in South Camden Deanery in the Edmonton Area of the Diocese of London.

St Pancras railway station was opened in 1868 by the Midland Railway as the southern terminus of its main line, which connected London with the East Midlands and Yorkshire. When inaugurated, the arched train shed by William Henry Barlow was the largest single-span roof in the world. Today, Midland main line services to Corby, Sheffield and Nottingham are operated by East Midlands Trains, and St Pancras is a stop on the Thameslink route as well as being the terminus of Southeastern high-speed trains to Kent.
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