Fortune Green

Park in/near Fortune Green, existing between 1646 and now

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Park · Fortune Green · NW6 ·
JANUARY
20
2015

Fortune Green lies to the north of the ancient village of West End.

Fortune Green
The first recorded mention of the green itself came in 1646 as a small area of manorial 'waste' where local residents had the right to graze animals, dig turf and play sports.

In 1820 about a third of the land in the north east corner was enclosed. Nine cottages were built for labourors and laundresses, who were allowed to keep drying poles on the Green for fourpence a year. At the southern tip of the Green is a fountain erected by the Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain Association. Even as late as 1870 the Green was still surrounded by open fields; however, the expansion of London was beginning to encroach. By the 1880s a local residential building boom was underway after the opening of West Hampstead's underground station (1879) and overground station (1888).

In 1891 the Green was put up for sale for development. But local residents formed the Fortune Green Preservation Society to prevent it being sold, and to maintain the residents' rights of recreation.

Challenging the validity of the sale in court, the Friends provided evidence that the Green had been in regular recreational use: Fortune Green Cricket Club played 'married vs singles' matches; boxing, rounders and trapball were also popular. Despite this, to the horror of local residents, a judge allowed the sale to proceed. Undaunted, the Fortune Green Acquisition Society was set up and managed to persuade the Vestry (Council) and London County Council to pay the bulk of the cost of acquiring the Green, together with smaller contributions from Henry Harben (a local benefactor), the Worshipful Companies of Skinners and Goldsmiths and local residents.

By December 1896 they had raised the asking price of £7000 and Fortune Green was saved. It took several more months to tie up legal details, but in January and February 1898, at a cost of £555, paths were laid out and the Green was properly turfed.

In 1971 ownership of the Green was transferred to the London Borough of Camden.

Text: Friends of Fortune Green


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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Fortune Green
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Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton
Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 22:50 GMT   
IP: 94.3.120.166
2:1:3395
Post by Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton: Netherwood Street, NW6

I was born at 63netherwood street.need to know who else lived there.i think I moved out because of a fire but not sure


VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE FORTUNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Fortune Green

Fortune Green was originally part of the district of Hampstead but became physically separated from it by the building of the new turnpike road (now Finchley Road) in the 1830s.

The name of Fortune Green is derived from foran-tune meaning in front of the tun, probably an inn in the area.

Originally Fortune Green was a patch of manorial waste, now in the north of the ward, where local residents had the right to graze animals, dig turf and play sports. The Green dwindled considerably in the 19th century when the lord of the manor granted enclosure rights for about a third of the area.

Lying on the south-west side of the Finchley Road, Hampstead town council decided to build its overflow cemetery here in the 1840s.

The arrival of the Midland Railway in 1871 brought rapid development and many large houses were demolished in favour of higher density buildings. Victorian residential buildings display considerable variety in their design and detail and there are a number of large distinctive red brick mansion blocks, most of which have remained unaltered.
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