Hyett’s hand-drawn 1807 map

William Hyett produced an amazingly accurate map of the London countryside in 1807, using just pen and paper.

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Article · St John's Wood · NW8 ·
MAY
27
2016

William Hyett produced an amazingly accurate map of the London countryside in 1807, using just pen and paper.

The 1807 Hyatt map
Credit: British Library
An interior decorator with royal patronage, Frederick Crace amassed some 1200 printed and hand-drawn maps charting the development of the city and its immediate vicinity from around 1570 to 1860.

A couple of these maps date from 1807 as William Hyett put pen and ink to paper and draw a remarkable accurate view of the than countryside around north and west London.

The individual settlements that make up this area of London are shown by red blocks, with boundary lines indicating the fields separating them. Shading and soft interlining indicate relief, neatly illustrated at Primrose Hill, the summit of which is left bare. The barracks at the edge of Hyde Park are illustrated at the very bottom of the map.

Please note that this map is only available at this zoom level - i.e. zooming in or out changes to a different set of mapping - this is in our special mapping section. Just in case you think things are acting a little weirdly.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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The 1807 Hyatt map
British Library


West End Lady
West End Lady   
Added: 7 Mar 2018 21:30 GMT   
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Post by West End Lady: Rossmore Road, NW1

Rossmore Road is not in Camden Town, it is in St Marylebone - I should know. I was born and raised there! If anyone wants a further information please post on here.

Alicemary
Alicemary   
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Post by Alicemary: Erskine Road, NW3

I am trying to find any information out about 3 Erskine Road. NW3. I have just come across an old identity card which was my Grandmothers, dated 1946 , this being where she then lived. If anyone can give me any information about this area then, or old photographs, that would be really good.

Alec donaldson
Alec donaldson   
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Post by Alec donaldson: North Wharf Road, W2

Was there a Wellington street there

LDNnews
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The Odeon Marble Arch (known as the Regal 1928-1945) was a cinema located opposite Marble Arch monument at the top of Park Lane, with its main entrance on Edgware Road.
The Odeon Marble Arch (known as the Regal 1928-1945) was a cinema located opposite Marble Arch monument at the top of Park Lane, with its main entrance on Edgware Road.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=2637

LDNnews
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=3011

VIEW THE ST JOHN'S WOOD AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE ST JOHN'S WOOD AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE ST JOHN'S WOOD AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE ST JOHN'S WOOD AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE ST JOHN'S WOOD AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

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St John's Wood

St John's Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent's Park.

St John’s Wood was once part of the Great Forest of Middlesex. The name derives from its mediaeval owners, the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Knights Hospitallers), an Augustinian order, which took over the land from the Knights Templar in 1323. After the Reformation and the Dissolution of monastic orders, St John’s Wood became Crown land, and Henry VIII established Royal Hunting Grounds in what became known as Marylebone Park, to the north of which lay St John’s Wood. Apart from short periods during the reign of Mary Tudor and Cromwell’s Protectorate, the area known as The St John’s Wood Estate remained Crown land until 1688.

Until the end of the eighteenth century, the area remained in agricultural use.

St John's Wood was developed from the early 19th century onwards. It was one of the first London suburbs to be developed with a large amount of low density 'villa' housing, as opposed to the terraced housing which was the norm in London up to the 19th century, even in expensive districts. Parts of St John's Wood have been rebuilt at a higher density, but it remains a highly desirable residential district, and one of the most expensive areas of London.

St John's Wood is the location of Lord's Cricket Ground, home of Middlesex County Cricket Club and the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), and original headquarters of the sport. It is also famous for Abbey Road Studios and the street Abbey Road, where The Beatles recorded, notably the Abbey Road album, the cover of which features the band crossing the road. Sir Paul McCartney has owned a property in the area since the 1960s and is regularly seen strolling along St John's Wood High Street.

The Rolling Stones referenced St John's Wood in their song Play With Fire. Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones lived on Carlton Hill, at the northern edge of St John's Wood, in the 1960s.

St John’s Wood station was opened on 20 November 1939 on a new section of deep-level tunnel constructed between Baker Street and Finchley Road when the Metropolitan Line's services on its Stanmore branch were transferred to the Bakerloo Line. It was transferred along with the rest of the Stanmore branch to the Jubilee Line when it opened in 1979.
With the opening of St John's Wood station, two nearby stations on the Metropolitan Line were closed. These were Lord's (which had originally been opened in 1868 as St John's Wood Road) and Marlborough Road.

The station building is located on the corner of Acacia Road and Finchley Road. The station is the nearest one to Lord's Cricket Ground and Abbey Road Studios. For this reason Beatles memorabilia are sold at the station.

The platform design remains the same as when opened in 1939, and was designed by Harold Stabler.
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