The Grange

Large house in/near Kilburn, existed between 1843 and the 1910s

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Large house · Kilburn · NW6 ·
December
18
2015

The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.

The Grange, from "The Graphic magazine", 1901
Credit: Marianne Colloms
The Peters family lived in the Grange from 1843 until its demolition.

Thomas Peters was a successful and wealthy coach builder who made coaches for Queen Victoria. The final occupant was Mrs Ada Peters, the widow of his son John Winpenny Peters. Ada died in the house on 5 February 1910.

The Grange was the last of Kilburn’s large houses. Suburban building surrounded the property, leaving the house and its extensive grounds marooned in a sea of small streets and tight terrace housing.

After Ada’s death, the land was parcelled out - much of it became Kilbrun Grange Park.

Meantime the house contents were disposed of in a 50 page catalogue, and the sheer volume of goods meant the auction lasted three days.

On 12 April 1910 more than 300 items of furniture went under the hammer, followed by 600 paintings, clocks and bronzes the next day. Finally there were around 1000 items of less valuable plate, china and kitchen equipment plus all the outdoor effects such as statues, six carriages built by Peters and Sons and a Merryweather fire engine. The sale commenced each day at 1pm, and the lots were knocked down at a rapid rate.

The house was earmarked for demolition so where possible, its structural components were sold for salvage. This included the door to the billiard room, purchased by local developer and publican Richard Pincham. He installed it as the new entry to a function hall on the first floor of his Railway Hotel on West End Lane.

xxx

The Grange, from "The Graphic magazine", 1901
Marianne Colloms


Ian Gammons
Ian Gammons   
Added: 3 Apr 2018 08:08 GMT   
IP: 81.131.100.203
2:1:34489
Post by Ian Gammons: Pamber Street, W10

Born in Pamber Street but moved to Harlow, Essex in 1958 when I was three years old. The air wasn?t clean in London and we had to move to cleaner air in Harlow - a new town with very clean air!


Paul Shepherd
Paul Shepherd   
Added: 16 Jan 2018 15:21 GMT   
IP: 90.255.234.91
2:2:34489
Post by Paul Shepherd: Chamberlayne Road, NW10

i lived in Rainham Rd in the 1960?s. my best friends were John McCollough and Rosalind Beevor. it was a good time to be there but local schools were not good and i got out before it went to a real slum. i gather it?s ok now.

Maria Russ
Maria Russ   
Added: 7 Dec 2017 09:46 GMT   
IP: 47.72.255.177
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Post by Maria Russ: Middle Row Bus Garage

My mum worked as a Clippie out from Middle Row Bus Garage and was conductress to George Marsh Driver. They travel the City and out to Ruislip and Acton duiring the 1950’s and 1960’s. We moved to Langley and she joined Windsor Bus Garage and was on the Greenline buses after that. It was a real family of workers from Middle Row and it formed a part of my early years in London. I now live in New Zealand, but have happy memories of the early years of London Transport and Middle Row Garage.
Still have mum’s bus badge.

Happy times they were.

Julia elsdon
Julia elsdon   
Added: 22 Nov 2017 18:19 GMT   
IP: 87.112.95.228
2:4:34489
Post by Julia elsdon: Shirland Mews, W9

I didn’t come from Shirland Mews, but stayed there when my father was visiting friends, sometime in the mid to late forties. As I was only a very young child I don’t remember too much. I seem to think there were the old stables or garages with the living accommodation above. My Mother came from Malvern Road which I think was near Shirland Mews. I remember a little old shop which had a "milk cow outside". So I was told, it was attached to the front of the shop and you put some money in and the milk would be dispensed into your container. Not too sure if it was still in use then. Just wonder if anyone else remembers it.yz5

Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton
Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 22:50 GMT   
IP: 94.3.120.166
2:5:34489
Post by Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton: Netherwood Street, NW6

I was born at 63netherwood street.need to know who else lived there.i think I moved out because of a fire but not sure


David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 3 Oct 2017 13:29 GMT   
IP: 81.156.41.30
2:6:34489
Post by David Jones-Parry: Tavistock Crescent, W11

I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood ,from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Cassandra Green
Cassandra Green   
Added: 19 Sep 2017 21:39 GMT   
IP: 95.149.2.213
2:7:34489
Post by Cassandra Green: Rudall Crescent, NW3

I lived at 2 Rudall Crescent until myself and my family moved out in 1999. I once met a lady in a art fair up the road who was selling old photos of the area and was very knowledgeable about the area history, collecting photos over the years. She told me that before the current houses were built, there was a large manor house , enclosed by a large area of land. She told me there had been a fire there. Im trying to piece together the story and find out what was on the land before the crescent was built. This website is very interesting.

Debbie hobbs
Debbie hobbs    
Added: 19 Sep 2017 09:08 GMT   
IP: 92.40.89.28
2:8:34489
Post by Debbie hobbs : Raymede Street, W10

I SUPPLIED THE PICTURE ABOVE GIVEN TO TOM VAGUE TO PASS ON... ITS DATE IS C1906 ..IN THE DISTANCE IS RACKHAM STREET WITH ITS MISSION HALL, HEWER STREET TO THE RIGHT

David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   
IP: 86.152.78.135
2:9:34489
Post by David Jones-Parry: Mcgregor Road, W11

I lived at 25 Mc Gregor Rd from 1938 my birth until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957.Our house sided onto Ridgeways Laundry All Saints Rd. I had a happy boyhood living there

Brenda Jackson
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   
IP: 94.13.78.193
2:10:34489
Post by Brenda Jackson: Granville Road, NW6

My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.
Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his fwife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

Alec donaldson
Alec donaldson   
Added: 31 Jul 2017 18:02 GMT   
IP: 86.171.222.102
2:11:34489
Post by Alec donaldson: North Wharf Road, W2

Was there a Wellington street there

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 16 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:12:34489
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Rillington Place is a small street with an infamous history.
Rillington Place is a small street with an infamous history.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=33838

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 9 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:13:34489
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=34634

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 5 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:14:34489
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=10027

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE KILBURN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Kilburn

Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).

Kilburn High Road originated as an ancient trackway, part of a Celtic route between the settlements now known as Canterbury and St Albans. Under Roman rule, the route was paved. In Anglo-Saxon times the road became known as Watling Street.

Kilburn grew up on the banks of a stream which has been known variously as Cuneburna, Kelebourne and Cyebourne, which flows from Hampstead down through Hyde Park and into the River Thames. It is suggested the name means either Royal River or Cattle River ('Bourne' being an Anglo-Saxon word for 'river'). That river is known today as the Westbourne.

The name Kilburn was first recorded in 1134 as Cuneburna, referring to the priory which had been built on the site of the cell of a hermit known as Godwyn. Godwyn had built his hermitage by the Kilburn river during the reign of Henry I, and both his hermitage and the priory took their name from the river.

Kilburn Priory was a small community of nuns, probably Augustinian canonesses. It was founded in 1134 at the Kilburn river crossing on Watling Street (the modern-day junction of Kilburn High Road and Belsize Road). Kilburn Priory's position on Watling Street meant that it became a popular resting point for pilgrims heading for the shrines at St Albans and Willesden. The Priory was dissolved in 1536-37 by Henry VIII, and nothing remains of it today. The priory lands included a mansion and a hostium (a guesthouse), which may have been the origin of the Red Lion pub, thought to have been founded in 1444. Opposite, the Bell Inn was opened around 1600, on the site of the old mansion.

The fashion for taking 'medicinal waters' in the 18th century came to Kilburn when a well of chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) was discovered near the Bell Inn in 1714. In an attempt to compete with the nearby Hampstead Well, gardens and a 'great room' were opened to promote the well, and its waters were promoted in journals of the day as cure for 'stomach ailments'.

In the 19th century the wells declined, but the Kilburn Wells remained popular as a tea garden. The Bell was demolished and rebuilt in 1863. The Kilburn stretch of Watling Street, now called Edgware Road and Kilburn High Road, was gradually built up with inns and farm houses. Kilburn did not attract any significant building until around 1819 in the area near St John's Wood.

Much of the area was developed in the last decades of the 19th century by Solomon Barnett, who named many of the streets after places in the West Country (e.g. Torbay) or after popular poets of the day (e.g. Tennyson) in honour of his wife.

There are three railway stations on Kilburn High Road: Kilburn tube station (Jubilee line) at its northern end and a little to the south Brondesbury station (London Overground). Approximately a mile further south is Kilburn High Road station (also London Overground). The name of Ian Dury's first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, refers to this road, as does the Flogging Molly song, "Kilburn High Road" and the Shack song, "Kilburn High Road".

Kilburn tube station opened as Kilburn and Brondesbury on 24 November 1879, as part of the Metropolitan and St. John's Wood Railway run by the Metropolitan Railway. Following the merger of the Metropolitan Railway into London Transport in 1933, it then became part of the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line on 20 November 1939, at which time the station was extensively rebuilt. The station was renamed to its current name on 25 September 1950. It was transferred to the Jubilee line on its opening, on 1 May 1979.
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