Westway, W11

Road in North Kensington, existing between 1970 and now

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Road · North Kensington · W10 · Contributed by The Underground Map
December
8
2015
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Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.

On 28 July 1970 the Westway, A40 Western Avenue Extension flyover between White City and Paddington, at two and half miles, the longest elevated road in Europe at the time, was opened by Michael Heseltine, the parliamentary secretary to the transport minister. The opening ceremony was famously accompanied by a protest over the re-housing of the last residents alongside the road. As demonstrators disrupted the ribbon cutting, a banner was unfurled on Acklam Road, looking on to the flyover, demanding: ‘Get Us Out of this Hell. Re-house Us Now’.

When the Portobello farmhouse was painted in 1864, shortly before its demise, the only other building on the lane north of the newly opened Hammersmith and City railway line was the Notting Barn Lodge at the future junction of Cambridge Gardens. Florence Gladstone wrote in ‘Notting Hill in Bygone Days’: ‘There seems to be a natural break where the railway embankment crosses Portobello Road. At this point the old lane was interrupted by low marshy ground, overgrown with rushes and watercress.’ But within a few years of the painting the last remaining fields of Portobello farm would become the streets of the Golborne ward.

Alongside the railway line boundary of the Golborne and Colville wards, Acklam Road was built in the late 1860s and stood for a hundred years, before being demolished to make way for the Westway flyover in the late 1960s. The road took its name from the Acklam village, now in Middlesborough, which like Rillington and Ruston is close to the Yorkshire country seat of the North Kensington developer Colonel St Quintin.

The old street featured the Duke of Sussex, an HH Finch pub on the corner of Portobello Road, on the site of the open-air market area by the entrance to the Acklam Village farmers market. At the beginning of the 20th century, on Charles Booth’s ‘Life and Labour of the People of London’ map, conditions on Acklam Road were assessed as fairly comfortable. In the 1914 street directory the south side was occupied by a laundry, coal dealer, loan office, greengrocer and general dealer, bootmaker and news vendor. On the north side there was a timber merchant, builders, French polisher, bricklayer, chandler’s shop, confectioner, beer retailer and tobacconist. In the 1930s there was the Pembroke Athletic Club boxing gym by the railway footbridge, and by the 1960s the scrap merchants Acklam Metals were established at number 20.

During the four years of construction work, for the remaining inhabitants of the north side of Acklam Road and the other surviving terraces close to the flyover, ‘continuous noise and dirt from heavy lorries and machinery became a familiar and unwelcome part of life.’ The sound of the Westway being built was described by Eileen Wright in ‘Taking on the Motorway’: “There was a terrible noise for weeks when they were pile-driving. They started at 6 O’clock in the morning – sometimes it went on all night. You think the whole city is being bombarded beneath you.”

From 1968 through the 70s, the wall alongside the Hammersmith and City line beneath the Westway between Portobello Road and Westbourne Park featured graffiti by the Situationist King Mob group that read: ‘Same thing day after day – Tube – Work – Diner (sic) – Work – Tube – Armchair – TV – Sleep – Tube – Work – How much more can you take – One in ten go mad – One in five cracks up.’

At the Westway opening in 1970 Michael Heseltine told the press: “There are two sides to this business. One is the exciting road building side… but there is also the human side of this thing, and how huge roads like this affect people living alongside them. You cannot but have sympathy for these people.” The Standard reported that: ‘the ministerial cavalcade later drove the length of the twin dual-carriageway running from Paddington to White City. On the way it passed Acklam Road, where bedrooms of houses are less than 50 feet from the elevated section of the road. Here the GLC is proposing to spend £250,000 buying 42 houses which have been ‘blighted’, demolish them and turn the land acquired into a buffer state.’
The Acklam Road residents’ representative George Clark protested to the Transport Minister John Peyton (who said he couldn’t attend the opening because he had to be at a cabinet meeting): “I want to make a statement to the minister about the hell on earth in North Kensington. During the 5 years it has taken to construct this engineering marvel, the lives and social conditions of the residents of Acklam Road and Walmer Road have been made hell upon earth. For these people the new urban highway is a social disaster." The Westway opening protest developed into a local dispute between Walmer Road and Acklam Road, as George Clark was blamed for holding up the re-housing of the former tenants in favour of the latter. International Times accused him of ‘diverting justifiable community anger from radical action into harmless words.’

As 47,000 vehicles a day began ‘cruising through the rooftops of North Kensington’, negotiations between the Motorway Development Trust and the Council resulted in the inauguration of a new trust with a half-Council/half-community management committee in 1971. Andrew Duncan wrote in his introduction to ’Taking on the Motorway’: ’Out of a 4-year campaign, North Kensington Amenity Trust was set up in partnership with the local authority in response to two demands: The mile strip of land under the motorway which lay within the borough’s boundaries should be used to compensate the community for the damage and destruction caused by the road; and the 23 acres should be held in trust to ensure that local people would be actively involved in determining its use. The story of the trust is one of conflict, for it was born out of bitter clashes between an angry local community and the two planning authorities that gave consent to the motorway intruder – the GLC and the RBK&C. But it is also a story of hope…’

Anthony Perry, the first director of North Kensington Amenity Trust, was a former film producer who had worked on the Beatles’ ‘Yellow Submarine’. He concluded that developing the Westway land ‘would call for qualities not unlike those needed for producing a film’, went for the job and got it. In his ‘A Tale of Two Kensingtons’ diary of the trust’s first 5 years from 1971 to 76, he pondered: ‘What is the Amenity Trust? In the very simplest terms, it is a charity that has been set up to develop the 23 acres of land under the elevated motorway in North Kensington in the interest of the community. No thought was given to the social implications for this working-class neighbourhood at the time the motorway was planned. The trust was set up in response to the great energy and pressure of a small number of local people.

‘The council wanted me to take an office at the town hall but it was essential I be on the spot so I occupied an empty house waiting for demolition, on the corner of Portobello and Acklam Road, and set up shop on May 28 1971 with the help of Pat Smythe, a tough resourceful member of the management committee who had set up the first adventure playground in Telford Road. 3 Acklam Road was one of a row of houses due to be demolished as being too close to the motorway. I subsequently got them reprieved and we did some repairs and re-wiring and gave rooms to local groups. Our office was the one overlooking the junction with Portobello Road.’

Hawkwind played a series of free gigs under the Westway, pictured on the gatefold sleeve of their 1971 album ‘X In Search of Space’, during which they would merge with the Pink Fairies as Pinkwind. Frendz underground paper (at 305 Portobello Road) made ‘a call to all progressive people; black people smash the racist immigration bill; workers of Britain smash the Industrial Relations bill. All progressive people unite and smash growing fascism. Rally and march July 25, Acklam Road, Ladbroke Grove 2pm. Black Unity and Freedom Party.’
In 1973 the Caribbean Notting Hill Carnival as we know it today was established on Acklam Road, facilitated by Anthony Perry and the Amenity Trust. The Carnival office under the administration of Leslie Palmer was at 3 Acklam Road for two years and then moved to number 9 in the mid 70s, when Selwyn Baptiste became director. At the Carnival 73 ‘Mas in the Ghetto’ Acklam Road was dotted with reggae sound-systems and ‘electric funk/Afro/black music’ bands including Black Slate on the corner of St Ervan’s Road. In his Carnival memoirs

Leslie Palmer recalls his first impressions of the area, Anthony Perry and the trust when he arrived on the scene in 73:

“Going to the North Kensington Amenity Trust at 3 Acklam Road offered me the opportunity to observe the derelict state of the terrace, which had been evacuated as they were close to the flyover and faced it directly. The Amenity Trust occupied the end house of the terrace that had been made functional and just about fit for purpose. Beside Cora, his secretary, there was the light skinned Jamaican worker Dave, who Anthony designated to help settle us in. The trust’s work was challenging as they were the most accessible body that seemingly represented the Council and as such they were the target for occasional grouses from disgruntled residents. Their main brief was to ascertain what amenities could be built on the undeveloped land under the flyover. The bays were empty and rubbish strewn but on the eastern side a small playgroup existed across Acklam from the derelict terrace.”
The photographer/artist Steve Mepsted was inspired by his childhood memories of the Acklam Road adventure playground to create the Orphans 70s street photo blow-up installation in the bays: ‘As a kid of 10 years old in 1973 I would play in the NKPG playground built in the Acklam Road bays – the very site of my installation. I was merely a visitor to the area at that time, travelling each Saturday morning from Redbridge in east London to help my mother on her market stall situated on the land now covered by the market tent. I returned to live here permanently at the age of 22; my decision to do so in no small way informed by my instant love of the area when I was a child.’

Acklam Road in the mid-70s is described in ‘Soft City’ by Jonathan Raban as consisting of: ‘a locked shack with Free Shop spraygunned on it, and old shoes and sofas piled in heaps around it; a makeshift playground under the arches of the motorway with huge crayon faces drawn on the concrete pillars, slogans in whitewash, from Smash the Pigs to Keep Britain White.’ The Free Shop hand sign on the corner of Acklam Road was sprayed with ‘It’s Only Rock’n’Roll’ graffiti, promoting the Rolling Stones’ 1974 single.

Emily Young recalled: “Under the motorway was just dead cats. People dumped rubbish and nobody cleared it. My idea was to have big archetypal figures and a continuing landscape of hills and green fields to bring a sense of space and freedom to the concrete bays.” As Anthony Perry was helping to establish the Notting Hill People’s Carnival, he was attacked in the People’s News (Notting Hill People’s Association’s newsletter) for getting private business funding for the community projects of the Amenity Trust, ‘set up to develop the land under the motorway for the people in the area’, rather than getting the Council to pay.

During the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival riot, the film director Don Letts walked across Portobello Road towards Acklam Road, as Rocco Macaulay began photographing the police charge towards the Westway, where the youths were gathered. Macaulay’s shot of ‘The Clash’ moment when police ran across the Acklam junction became the back cover of the first Clash album and the backdrop of their ‘White Riot’ tour. The Don Letts’ Wild West 10 walk appeared on the sleeve of the ‘Black Market Clash’ album.

As Joe Strummer sang ‘Up and down the Westway, in and out the lights, what a great traffic system’, the Clash were photographed under the flyover by the Free Shop and Bob Marley was on the Acklam corner at the 1977 Carnival, establishing the site as ground zero of the west London punky reggae party. Acklam Road at the time of the 76 riot appears in the gritty detective film ‘The Squeeze’, starring Stacy Keach and Freddie Starr. In 2007 Mick Jones returned to ‘The Clash’ photo location with his Rock’n’Roll Library exhibition and the Strummerville studio at 2 Acklam Road.

Source: It’s Your Colville

VIEW THE NORTH KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
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VIEW THE NORTH KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1800s
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VIEW THE NORTH KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1830s
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VIEW THE NORTH KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1860s
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VIEW THE NORTH KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

 
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Go to North Kensington

North Kensington

North Kensington lies either side of Ladbroke Grove, W10.

North Kensington was rural until the 19th century when it was developed as an suburb with quite large homes. By the 1880s, too many houses had been built for the upper-middle class towards whom the area was aimed. Large houses were divided into low cost flats which often degenerated into slums, as documented in the photographs of Roger Mayne.

During the 1980s, the area started to be gentrified although areas in the north west of the district at Ladbroke Grove and Westbourne Park remain deprived and run down to this day.

Waves of immigrants have arrived for at least a century including, but certainly not limited to, the Spanish, the Irish, the Jews, the West Indians, the Portuguese, the Moroccans and many from the Horn of Africa and Eastern Europe. This constant renewal of the population makes the area one of the most cosmopolitan in London.

The Notting Hill carnival was first staged in 1964 as a way for the local Afro-Caribbean communities to celebrate their own cultures and traditions. After some rough times in the 1970s and 1980s when it became associated with social protest, violence and huge controversy over policing tactics, this is now Europe’s largest carnival/festival event and a major event in the London calendar. It is staged every August over the Bank holiday weekend.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
A seminal gig:   Once upon a time in 1979, Joy Division, OMD and A Certain Ratio were on the same bill - and all for £1.50.
Acklam Hall:   Acklam Hall became a community centre for the post-Westway Acklam Road
Acklam Road Adventure Playground:   Acklam Road Adventure Playground was created in the 1960s.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed):   The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
All Saints Church:   All Saints church was designed by the Victorian Gothic revival pioneer William White, who was also a mountaineer, Swedish gymnastics enthusiast and anti-shaving campaigner.
Barlby Road Primary School:   Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Basing Street (SARM) Studios:   SARM Studios is a recording studio, established by Chris Blackwell, the founder of Island Records.
Bassett House School:   Bassett House School is a preparatory school for children aged 3 to 11 years old based in North Kensington.
Cabaret Voltaire in Acklam Road:   Cabaret Voltaire played one of their classic early gigs under the flyover in Acklam Road.
Carmelite Monastery of The Most Holy Trinity:   Convent in North Kensington
Color Printing Works:   Color (sic) Printing Works featured on the 1900 map of North Kensington.
Dissenters’ Chapel:   The Dissenters’ Chapel is a redundant chapel in Kensal Green Cemetery, recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.
Gas Light and Coke Company:   The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Help us to build a better W10!:   We are after your memories!
I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet:   I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet was a clothing boutique which achieved fame in 1960s "Swinging London" by promoting antique military uniforms as fashion items.
Kensington Hippodrome:   The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Kensington Park Hotel:   The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Grove:   Ladbroke Grove is a road in the North Kensington/Notting Hill. Running from Notting Hill itself in the south to Kensal Green in the north, it straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
North Kensington Library:   North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.
North Kensington:   North Kensington lies either side of Ladbroke Grove, W10.
Notting Hill Barn Farm:   Notting Barns Farm was one of two farms in the North Kensington area.
Portobello Farm:   Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
Princess Louise Hospital:   The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women.
Queen Victoria/Narrow Boat:   The 'Vic' was the first building on the right when crossing the canal going north along Ladbroke Grove.
Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School:   Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School is in St Charles Square.
St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College:   St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College is a Roman Catholic sixth form college.
St Charles Hospital:   The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Martins Mission:   Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin Park & Wormwood Scrubbs:   St Quintin Park & Wormwood Scrubbs - two spellings missing from the modern map.
St. Joseph's Home:   St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Apollo:   The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road:   From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
The Eagle:   The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Mitre:   The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Acklam Road protests:   Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Albert Hotel (1900s):   The Albert Hotel, on the corner of All Saints Road and Cornwall Road (now Westbourne Park Road).
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Exmoor Street (1950):   Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Golborne Road bridge (1960s):   We think that this photo dates from the late 1960s, according to fashions and car registrations.
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s):   Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Kids in Acklam Road:   Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900):   This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1950):   Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge:   Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Political meeting (1920s):   Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950):   A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950):   A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951):   Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Charles’ Square Training College (1908):   St Charles’ Square Training College/Carmelite Convent.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s):   Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
The Victoria (1920s):   The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it ’conveniently burned down’.
Under westway (1977):   Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Acklam Road, W10 · Admiral Mews, W10 · Alba Place, W11 · Albert Court East Block, SW7 · Albert Court West Block, SW7 · Albert Court, SW7 · Albert Hall Mansions, SW7 · All Saints Road, W11 · Archway Close, W10 · Arundel Gardens, W11 · Ashburn Gardens, SW7 · Ashburn Place, SW7 · Astwood Mews, SW7 · Atherstone Mews, SW7 · Balliol Road, W10 · Barlby Gardens, W10 · Barlby Road, W10 · Basing Street, W11 · Bassett Road, W10 · Bevington Road, W10 · Blenheim Crescent, W11 · Bolney Gate, SW7 · Bonchurch Road, W10 · Bracewell Road, W10 · Branstone Street, W10 · Brechin Place, SW7 · Bruce Close, W10 · Calverley Street, W10 · Cambridge Gardens, W10 · Camelford Walk, W11 · Canal Close, W10 · Canal Way, W10 · Chesterton Road, W10 · Clareville Street, SW7 · Claylands Road, SW7 · Clydesdale Road, W11 · Codrington Mews, W11 · Colville Square, W11 · Convent Gardens, W11 · Cornwall Crescent, W11 · Cornwall Gardens, SW7 · Courtfield Road, SW7 · Cromwell Gardens, SW7 · Cromwell Place, SW7 · Cromwell Road, SW7 · Dale Row, W11 · Dalgarno Gardens, W10 · Dulford Street, W11 · Edenham Way, W10 · Elgin Mews, W11 · Elkstone Road, W10 · Elvaston Mews, SW7 · Elvaston Place, SW7 · Emperors Gate, SW7 · Exmoor Street, W10 · Faraday Road, W10 · Finstock Road, W10 · Folly Mews, W11 · Gloucester Arcade, SW7 · Golborne Mews, W10 · Golborne Road, W10 · Golden Mews, W11 · Grenville Place, SW7 · Harrington Gardens, SW7 · Harrington Road, SW7 · Hayden’s Place, W11 · Hayden’s Place, W11 · Hewer Street, W10 · Highlever Road, W10 · Hyde Park Gate, SW7 · Imperial College Road, SW7 · Ivebury Court, W10 · Jay Mews, SW7 · Kelfield Mews, W10 · Kensington Park Mews, W11 · Kensington Park Road, W11 · Kingsbridge Road, W10 · Kynance Mews, SW7 · Kynance Place, SW7 · Ladbroke Crescent, W11 · Ladbroke Grove, W10 · Lancaster Road, W11 · Lavie Mews, W10 · Lionel Mews, W10 · Malton Mews, W10 · Malton Road, W10 · Manchester Road, W10 · Manson Mews, SW7 · Manson Place, SW7 · Matthew Close, W10 · Maxilla Walk, W10 · Mcgregor Road, W11 · Methwold Road, W10 · Mitre Way, W10 · Morgan Road, W10 · Munro Mews, W10 · North Pole Road, W10 · Oakworth Road, W10 · Orchard Close, W10 · Osten Mews, SW7 · Oxford Gardens, W10 · Pamber Street, W10 · Pangbourne Avenue, W10 · Pelham Place, SW7 · Pelham Street, SW7 · Petersham Mews, SW7 · Petersham Place, SW7 · Porlock Street, W10 · Portobello Road, W11 · Powis Gardens, W11 · Prince Consort Road, SW7 · Queens Gate Gardens, SW7 · Queens Gate Mews, SW7 · Queens Gate Place Mews, SW7 · Queens Gate Place, SW7 · Queens Gate Terrace, SW7 · Queens Gate, SW7 · Queensberry Place, SW7 · Rackham Street, W10 · Raddington Road, W10 · Raymede Street, W10 · Reece Mews, SW7 · Rosary Gardens, SW7 · Ruston Mews, W11 · Saint Lawrence Terrace, W10 · Salters Road, W10 · Scampston Mews, W10 · Silchester Street, W10 · Silvester Mews, W11 · South Terrace, SW7 · Southam Street, W10 · Southwell Gardens, SW7 · St Charles Place, W10 · St Charles Square, W10 · St Ervans Road, W10 · St Helens Gardens, W10 · St Johns Terrace, W10 · St Lawrence Terrace, W10 · St Lukes Mews, W11 · St Luke’s Mews, W11 · St Marks Road, W10 · St Mark’s Close, W11 · St Mark’s Place, W11 · St Quintin Avenue, W10 · St Quintin Gardens, W10 · St. Mark’s Road, W11 · Stanhope Gardens, SW7 · Stanhope Mews East, SW7 · Sunbeam Crescent, W10 · Sutton Way, W10 · Tavistock Crescent, W11 · Tavistock Mews, W11 · Tavistock Road, W11 · Telford Road, W10 · Thorpe Close, W10 · Thurloe Place, SW7 · Thurloe Square, SW7 · Treverton Street, W10 · Verdi Crescent, W10 · Vernon Yard, W11 · Victora Road, WD6 · Walmer Road, W10 · Westbourne Park Road, W11 · Westway, W11 · Wetherby Place, SW7 · Wheatstone Road, W10 · Wornington Road, W10 ·


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Links

North Kensington Histories
Recollections of people from North Kensington, London
Old Notting Hill/North Ken History
Facebook group, covering the history of W10 and W11.
RBKC Library Time Machine
Blog from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Library
Latimer Road
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Notting Hill Gate
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Westbourne Park
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Holland Park
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The Notting Hill & North Kensington Photo Archive
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Born in W10
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Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.

Maps


Inner West London (1932) FREE DOWNLOAD
1930s map covering East Acton, Holland Park, Kensington, Notting Hill, Olympia, Shepherds Bush and Westbourne Park,
George Philip & Son, Ltd./London Geographical Society, 1932

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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