Acton Central

Rail station, existing between 1853 and now

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Rail station · Acton Central · W3 ·
October
4
2017

Acton Central railway station is on the North London Line, now part of the London Overground system, between South Acton and Willesden Junction.


The station was opened as Acton on 1 August 1853 by the North and South Western Junction Railway (N&SWJR), but was renamed Acton Central on 1 November 1925.

Between 1875 and 1902 it was connected with St Pancras via the Dudding Hill Line, which branches off the North London Line between Acton Central and Willesden Junction. Harlesden (Midland) railway station was the next stop on the line north. The Dudding Hill Line is still open today, but only carries freight.

Acton Central station was named for closure by the 1963 Beeching Report, also known as the Beeching Axe.

The station is where trains change power supply from overhead line equipment (AC) to Third rail (DC), or vice versa, depending on direction of travel.


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THE STREETS OF ACTON CENTRAL
Goldsmith Road, W3 Goldsmith Road is a street in Acton.



Ian Gammons
Ian Gammons   
Added: 3 Apr 2018 08:08 GMT   
IP: 81.131.100.203
2:1:350
Post by Ian Gammons: Pamber Street, W10

Born in Pamber Street but moved to Harlow, Essex in 1958 when I was three years old. The air wasn?t clean in London and we had to move to cleaner air in Harlow - a new town with very clean air!


Vallie Webster
Vallie Webster   
Added: 16 Mar 2018 03:39 GMT   
IP: 142.114.172.35
2:2:350
Post by Vallie Webster: Tunis Road, W12

I visited my grandmother who lived on Tunis Road from Canada in approximately 1967-68. I remember the Rag and Bone man who came down the road with a horse and milk delivered to the door with cream on the top. I also remember having to use an outhouse in the back of the row house. No indoor plumbing. We had to have a bath in a big metal tub (like a horse trough) in the middle of the kitchen filled with boiled water on the stove. Very different from Canada. My moms madin name was Hardcastle. Interesting to see the maps. Google maps also brings the world closer.


Norman Norrington
Norman Norrington   
Added: 19 Jan 2018 14:49 GMT   
IP: 90.194.159.199
2:3:350
Post by Norman Norrington: Blechynden Street, W10

In the photo of Blechynden St on the right hand side the young man in the doorway could be me. That is the doorway of 40 Blechynden St.

I lived there with My Mum Eileen and Dad Bert and Brothers Ron & Peter. I was Born in Du Cane Rd Hosp. Now Hammersmith Hosp.

Left there with my Wife Margaret and Daughter Helen and moved to Stevenage. Mum and Dad are sadly gone.

I now live on my own in Bedfordshire, Ron in Willesden and Pete in Hayling Island.

Have many happy memories of the area and go back 3/4 times a year now 75 but it pulls back me still.

Paul Shepherd
Paul Shepherd   
Added: 16 Jan 2018 15:21 GMT   
IP: 90.255.234.91
2:4:350
Post by Paul Shepherd: Chamberlayne Road, NW10

i lived in Rainham Rd in the 1960?s. my best friends were John McCollough and Rosalind Beevor. it was a good time to be there but local schools were not good and i got out before it went to a real slum. i gather it?s ok now.

Susan Wright
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   
IP: 120.154.67.244
2:5:350
Post by Susan Wright: Bramley Mews, W10

My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

Patricia Neafsey
Patricia Neafsey   
Added: 4 Sep 2017 15:55 GMT   
IP: 72.200.171.94
2:6:350
Post by Patricia Neafsey: Fishers Lane, W4

My ancestors (Dady) lived in Myrtle Cottage, Fishers Lane in 1900 or so. Do you have any information? Was it associated with a manor house?

jim curtis
jim curtis   
Added: 18 Aug 2017 15:58 GMT   
IP: 92.238.32.194
2:7:350
Post by jim curtis: Shaftesbury Road, TW9

my grandparents lived @ no23 for many years.We used to have christmas dinner there then all walk round to great aunt mabels at 97 lower mortlake road for the great evenings fun & games,all sides of the family maybe 25-30 people.unfortunatley after granddad died it all petered out about 1960.Very sad. dont seem to have good times like those now.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 9 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:8:350
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Stephenson Street was built in 1889 by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) for its employees.
Stephenson Street was built in 1889 by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) for its employees.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=29937

VIEW THE ACTON CENTRAL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE ACTON CENTRAL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE ACTON CENTRAL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE ACTON CENTRAL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE ACTON CENTRAL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Acton Central

Acton Central railway station is on the North London Line, now part of the London Overground system, between South Acton and Willesden Junction.

The station was opened as Acton on 1 August 1853 by the North and South Western Junction Railway (N&SWJR), but was renamed Acton Central on 1 November 1925.

Between 1875 and 1902 it was connected with St Pancras via the Dudding Hill Line, which branches off the North London Line between Acton Central and Willesden Junction. Harlesden (Midland) railway station was the next stop on the line north. The Dudding Hill Line is still open today, but only carries freight.

Acton Central station was named for closure by the 1963 Beeching Report, also known as the Beeching Axe.

The station is where trains change power supply from overhead line equipment (AC) to Third rail (DC), or vice versa, depending on direction of travel.
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