PPP Community School

School in/near Notting Dale, existing between 2011 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG  CONTACT 
3.80.177.176 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302018Fullscreen map
School · Notting Dale · W10 ·
MAY
30
2018


Other independent special school which accepts students between the ages of 13 and 17.

PPP Community School is a mixed school which opened in 2011.

Total school capacity: 52.
Enrolment (2018): 32.
Girls enrolled (2018): 10.
Boys enrolled (2018): 25.
It has a website at: http://www.theppp.org.uk.



Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



Add your own contribution to PPP Community School.
Ensure that contributions are kept civilised and are not abusive.
We store your comment's IP address and reserve the right to apply bans where community standards are violated.
Please enter your name:
Enter the information you wish to add to PPP Community School:
Please prove that you are a human by typing the text that you see in the picture below.
CAPTCHA Image
Refresh Image
You can completely dispense with this CAPTCHA palava by logging onto our Facebook app.
Contribution type:
 

If you authorise our The Undeground Map Facebook app by clicking the Facebook logo at the top right of the screen, you can add stories, photos and more to this location.
Note that the Undeground Map Facebook app does not post to Facebook on your behalf.
musixdek
musixdek   
Added: 2 Dec 2018 22:23 GMT   
IP: 89.28.24.190
2:1:35902
Post by musixdek: The Prince of Wales Cinema

Something new for me;)

musixdek
musixdek   
Added: 30 Nov 2018 16:28 GMT   
IP: 89.28.24.190
2:2:35902
Post by musixdek: The Prince of Wales Cinema

Good:)

Jackie Drinkwater
Jackie Drinkwater   
Added: 15 Nov 2018 09:22 GMT   
IP: 213.205.198.10
2:3:35902
Post by Jackie Drinkwater: Elgin Crescent, W11

My Father Richard Knappe was born at 133 Elgin Crescent in 1923. My Grandfather being a refugee from the Italian border town of Gorizia.

Ian Gammons
Ian Gammons   
Added: 3 Apr 2018 08:08 GMT   
IP: 81.131.100.203
2:4:35902
Post by Ian Gammons: Pamber Street, W10

Born in Pamber Street but moved to Harlow, Essex in 1958 when I was three years old. The air wasn?t clean in London and we had to move to cleaner air in Harlow - a new town with very clean air!


Vallie Webster
Vallie Webster   
Added: 16 Mar 2018 03:39 GMT   
IP: 142.114.172.35
2:5:35902
Post by Vallie Webster: Tunis Road, W12

I visited my grandmother who lived on Tunis Road from Canada in approximately 1967-68. I remember the Rag and Bone man who came down the road with a horse and milk delivered to the door with cream on the top. I also remember having to use an outhouse in the back of the row house. No indoor plumbing. We had to have a bath in a big metal tub (like a horse trough) in the middle of the kitchen filled with boiled water on the stove. Very different from Canada. My moms madin name was Hardcastle. Interesting to see the maps. Google maps also brings the world closer.


Norman Norrington
Norman Norrington   
Added: 19 Jan 2018 14:49 GMT   
IP: 90.194.159.199
2:6:35902
Post by Norman Norrington: Blechynden Street, W10

In the photo of Blechynden St on the right hand side the young man in the doorway could be me. That is the doorway of 40 Blechynden St.

I lived there with My Mum Eileen and Dad Bert and Brothers Ron & Peter. I was Born in Du Cane Rd Hosp. Now Hammersmith Hosp.

Left there with my Wife Margaret and Daughter Helen and moved to Stevenage. Mum and Dad are sadly gone.

I now live on my own in Bedfordshire, Ron in Willesden and Pete in Hayling Island.

Have many happy memories of the area and go back 3/4 times a year now 75 but it pulls back me still.

Mary Harris
Mary Harris   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 17:12 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:7:35902
Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

Message truncated Show whole message

Maria Russ
Maria Russ   
Added: 7 Dec 2017 09:46 GMT   
IP: 47.72.255.177
2:8:35902
Post by Maria Russ: Middle Row Bus Garage

My mum worked as a Clippie out from Middle Row Bus Garage and was conductress to George Marsh Driver. They travel the City and out to Ruislip and Acton duiring the 1950’s and 1960’s. We moved to Langley and she joined Windsor Bus Garage and was on the Greenline buses after that. It was a real family of workers from Middle Row and it formed a part of my early years in London. I now live in New Zealand, but have happy memories of the early years of London Transport and Middle Row Garage.
Still have mum’s bus badge.

Happy times they were.

David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 3 Oct 2017 13:29 GMT   
IP: 81.156.41.30
2:9:35902
Post by David Jones-Parry: Tavistock Crescent, W11

I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood ,from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

Debbie hobbs
Debbie hobbs    
Added: 19 Sep 2017 09:08 GMT   
IP: 92.40.89.28
2:10:35902
Post by Debbie hobbs : Raymede Street, W10

I SUPPLIED THE PICTURE ABOVE GIVEN TO TOM VAGUE TO PASS ON... ITS DATE IS C1906 ..IN THE DISTANCE IS RACKHAM STREET WITH ITS MISSION HALL, HEWER STREET TO THE RIGHT

Susan Wright
Susan Wright   
Added: 16 Sep 2017 22:42 GMT   
IP: 120.154.67.244
2:11:35902
Post by Susan Wright: Bramley Mews, W10

My Great Grandmother Ada Crowe was born in 9 Bramley Mews in 1876.

David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   
IP: 86.152.78.135
2:12:35902
Post by David Jones-Parry: Mcgregor Road, W11

I lived at 25 Mc Gregor Rd from 1938 my birth until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957.Our house sided onto Ridgeways Laundry All Saints Rd. I had a happy boyhood living there

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 11 Dec 2018 06:30 GMT   
IP:
3:13:35902
Post by LDNnews: Willesden Junction
’I was divorced and missed having company’
Rupert Hunt created flat-sharing website SpareRoom - and then ended up needing to use it himself after his marriage ended.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46453516

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 10 Dec 2018 13:30 GMT   
IP:
3:14:35902
Post by LDNnews: Shepherds Bush Market
Two Years in Jail for Hammersmith and Fulham Police Officer
Scott Johnson had an inappropriate relationship with a vulnerable female

http://www.shepherdsbushw12.com/default.asp?section=info&link=http://neighbournet.com/server/common/hfpolice065b.htm

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 10 Dec 2018 11:30 GMT   
IP:
3:15:35902
Post by LDNnews: Goldhawk Road
Book Your Seat at a Festive Treat
Your guide to Christmas shows including Bush Theatre’s Unwrapped

http://www.shepherdsbushw12.com/default.asp?section=info&link=http://neighbournet.com/server/common/hftheatres009.htm

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 10 Dec 2018 05:40 GMT   
IP:
3:16:35902
Post by LDNnews: Willesden Junction
European Rugby Champions Cup: Saracens 51-25 Cardiff Blues
Saracens make it three wins from three in the Champions Cup with a high-scoring comeback victory over Cardiff Blues.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/rugby-union/46444382

VIEW THE NOTTING DALE AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE NOTTING DALE AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE NOTTING DALE AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE NOTTING DALE AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE NOTTING DALE AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Notting Dale

From Pigs and bricks to Posh and Becks...

As houses were springing up all over the rest of northern Kensington, one corner of the borough was developing into a slum whose notoriety was probably unsurpassed throughout London

It lay at the foot of the hill on which the Ladbroke estate was laid out, directly north of Pottery Lane, on badly draining clay soil between the Norland Estate and Notting Barns Farm.

Its first occupants were to give it two infamous names: the brick makers, who seemed to have arrived in the late lath century, and the pig-keepers, who moved there in the early l9th century.

To make bricks and tiles involved large excavations, which soon filled with stagnant water. The keeping of pigs entailed collecting refuse and offal from the kitchens of hotels and private houses, feeding most of it to pigs and boiling down the fat.

The combination of both bricks and pigs spelt disaster for the area.

Samuel Lake of Tottenham Court Road, a scavenger and chimney sweep by occupation was the first to keep pigs here and he was soon joined by the pig keepers of the Marble Arch area who had been forced out of their area by building development. The colony was at first sufficiently isolated to be able to go about their business unfettered; and by the time streets were being built nearby, the piggeries were so well established that developers simply steered clear.

Shacks sprang up wherever convenient for there was no building control in London at that time, and inevitably they were jumbled together with the pigs and the ponds: indeed often the three were combined, with humans sharing their roofs with animals and living directly over stagnant water: the animals at one stage outnumbered people by three to one.

The area’s unsanitary conditions had become so notorious that Charles Dickens ran a special feature on it in the first edition issue of his magazine Household Words.

The Piggeries and Brickyards were far from the sight and concern of the Vestry and its duties were taken up by charities, both religious and secular. But it was Kensington’s first Medical Officer of Health, Dr Francis Goodrich, who was given the formidable task of cleaning up the area. Goodrich stated that it was one of the most deplorable
spots not only in Kensington but in the whole of the metropolis.

Rather than manufacturing bricks, locals started to concentrate more on the making of pottery, mostly drainpipes, tiles and flower pots to supply the local building boom. This trade, however, gradually declined and business ceased by 1863, the same time as when the stagnant ’Ocean’ was filled in.

As far as the Piggeries were concerned strong opposition to a clean up came from the pig keepers themselves, as that was their only livelihood. And perversely the Vestry did not want them to lose the pigs because the families then could become a charge on the poor rate.

By 1878 Goodrich’s successor Dr Dudfield managed, however, to gradually reduce the number of pigs but it was not until the 1890’s that the last pig was banished.

The area nevertheless remained notorious. Instead of pig keeping the men turned to living off what their women could earn as laundresses, initially at home (especially in
the Stoneleigh Street area) and later in small laundries. A local saying in this area declared that ’to marry an ironer is as good as a fortune’

But change was coming.

The 1860s at last witnessed the opening of schools, (such as one in Sirdar Road), the paving of streets and the construction of proper sewers. But it was not until 1888 were public baths and washhouses provided at the junction of Silchester and Lancaster Roads.

In 1889 the Rev C E Roberts of St Clements Church and the Rev Dr Thornton of St Johns appealed in a letter to the Times for an open space for the children of this area. As a result the old brickfield and the area of the ’Ocean’ became the start of Avondale Park opened in 1892 and named in memory of the recently deceased Duke of Clarence and Avondale.

But even then, a year after the park was opened that the Daily News described the area adjacent to the park as ’Avernus’ (the fabled gateway to hell!). The article identified Wilsham Street, Kenley Street, another two streets now replaced by Henry Dickens Court and part of Sirdar Road as ’hopelessly degraded and abandoned’.

The dense rows of artisan houses in these streets were massively over-occupied or else were the most primitive lodging houses in which a bed on the floor cost a few pennies per night. Local residents made a living as best they could but it was a close knit community who seemed to scrape together enough money to pay for visits to the music hall and for summer day trips.

By 1904 new low cost tenements were built and the Improved Tenements Association bought 64 year leases of four houses in Walmer Road in 1900, and these were modernised and divided into two room tenements to accommodate 13 families for rents of 5 shillings a week. Other housing associations followed such as the Wilsham Trust formed by Ladies- in-waiting at Kensington Palace.

The poverty and hardship of the Potteries and Piggeries is very much a thing of the past. Now the neighbourhood is an attractive, leafy, peaceful backwater made up of rows of well kept two and three storey Victorian brick terraced houses and cottages, in the shadow of the graceful golden weather vane and clock of St Clements Church.

The area has come a long way.

Sources:
The Notting Hill & Holland Park Book by Richard Tames
Kensington & Chelsea by Annabel Walker with Peter Jackson
Notting Hill and Holland Park Past by Barbara Denny
Survey of London: Northern Kensington: Vol:XXXVII for the Greater London Council


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Addison Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed):   The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Avondale Park Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Bassett House School:   Bassett House School is a mixed independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Beaumont Arms:   The former Beaumont Arms at 170 Uxbridge Road has been known by later names such as "Edwards" and "The Defectors Weld".
Cape Nursery:   The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.
Carmelite Monastery of The Most Holy Trinity:   Convent in North Kensington
Clayton Arms:   A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Color Printing Works:   Color (sic) Printing Works featured on the 1900 map of North Kensington.
Dissenters’ Chapel:   The Dissenters’ Chapel is a redundant chapel in Kensal Green Cemetery, recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.
Earl of Zetland:   A pub in the Potteries
Gas Light and Coke Company:   The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Goldhawk Road:   Goldhawk Road station lies on the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines.
Kenilworth Castle:   The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Kensal House:   There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Kensington Memorial Park:   
La Petite Ecole Bilingue:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
La Petite Ecole Francaise:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Latimer AP Academy:   Academy alternative provision converter which accepts students between the ages of 5 and 18.
Latimer Road:   A station not named after the road it stands on
Luxurious sewers:   The effluent society
Mary Place Workhouse:   Notting Dale Workhouse stood on the site of what is now Avondale Park Gardens,
Masbro Childrens Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Maxilla Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Notting Dale:   From Pigs and bricks to Posh and Becks...
Notting Hill Barn Farm:   Notting Barns Farm was one of two farms in the North Kensington area.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days: St. Charles’s Ward:   Chapter 10 of the book "Notting Hill in Bygone Days" by Florence Gladstone (1924)
Oxford Gardens Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Princess Louise Hospital:   The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women.
Queen Victoria/Narrow Boat:   The 'Vic' was the first building on the right when crossing the canal going north along Ladbroke Grove.
Saint Francis of Assisi Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Shepherd's Bush Market:   Shepherd’s Bush Market is a station on both the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines.
Shepherd's Bush Market:   Shepherd’s Bush Market is a street market located on the east side of the railway viaduct for the Hammersmith and City Tube line.
Shepherds Bush:   Shepherd's Bush is an area of west London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.
Shepherds Bush Families Project and children’s centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School:   Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School is in St Charles Square.
Sion-Manning Catholic Girls’ School:   Voluntary aided school (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
St Anne’s & Avondale Park Nursery School:   Local authority nursery school (Nursery) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 5.
St Charles Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College:   St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College is a Roman Catholic sixth form college.
St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College:   Further education (16 plus) which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 99.
St Charles Hospital:   The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Martins Mission:   Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin’s Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Tabernacle School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 18. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
The Foresters:   A lost pub of London W10
Thomas Jones Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Western Arms:   The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
Western Iron Works:   The Western Iron Works was the foundry business of James Bartle and Co.
White City:   White City was the place which defined the modern Marathon.
Wood Lane:   Although Wood Lane is on an Underground Line which has been in operation since 1864, the station is newer.
Young Dancers Academy:   The Young Dancers Academy is an independent vocational school specialising in classical ballet which accepts students between the ages of 10 and 16.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Bangor Street:   2015
Bangor Street:   2015
Corner of Bangor and Sirdar Road:   2015
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Exmoor Street (1950):   Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900):   This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge:   Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950):   A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
Ridler's Tyre Yard:   Ridler's Tyres was situated in a part of Blechynden Street which no longer exists
St Charles Square after bombing (1950):   A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles’ Square Training College (1908):   St Charles’ Square Training College/Carmelite Convent.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s):   Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
The Victoria (1920s):   The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it ’conveniently burned down’.
Western Dwellings from below (1960s):   This photo was taken from the bottom of Southern Row steps.
William Miller's Yard:   William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.
Wood Lane (1914) :   Wood Lane - apparently London’s "go-to" station.
Wood Lane cottages (1890):   Old cottages in Wood Lane, c. 1890.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Addison Gardens, W14 · Addison Place, W11 · Admiral Mews, W10 · Aldermaston Street, W10 · Aldine Street, W12 · Anley Road, W14 · Ansleigh Place, W11 · Archway Close, W10 · Ariel Way, W12 · Avondale Park Gardens, W11 · Avondale Park Road, W11 · Balliol Road, W10 · Bamborough Gardens, W12 · Bangor Street, W11 · Bard Road, W10 · Barlby Gardens, W10 · Barlby Road, W10 · Bartle Road, W11 · Bassett Road, W10 · Batoum Gardens, W6 · Blake Close, W10 · Blechynden Mews, W11 · Blechynden Street, W10 · Bolingbroke Road, W14 · Bomore Road, W11 · Bourbon Lane, W12 · Bramley Mews, W10 · Bramley Road, W10 · Bramley Road, W11 · Bramley Street, W10 · Branstone Street, W10 · Brewster Gardens, W10 · Bridge Close, W10 · Bruce Close, W10 · Bulwer Street, W12 · Calderon Place, W10 · Calverley Street, W10 · Camelford Walk, W11 · Canal Close, W10 · Canal Way, W10 · Caxton Road, W12 · Charecroft Way, W12 · Charecroft Way, W14 · Charlotte Mews, W10 · Chesterton Road, W10 · Clarendon Cross, W11 · Cromwell Grove, W6 · Crowthorne Road, W10 · Dalgarno Gardens, W10 · Dalgarno Way, W10 · Darfield Way, W10 · Darfield Way, W10 · Darnley Terrace, W11 · Depot Road, W12 · Dulford Street, W11 · East Mews, W10 · Elsham Road, W14 · Evesham Street, W11 · Exmoor Street, W10 · Eynham Road, W12 · Finstock Road, W10 · Fowell Street, W10 · Freston Road, W10 · Freston Road, W11 · Frog Island, W12 · Gorham Place, W11 · Grenfell Road, W11 · Grenfell Tower, W11 · Hansard Mews, W12 · Hansard Mews, W14 · Hewer Street, W10 · Highlever Road, W10 · Hill Farm Road, W10 · Hippodrome Mews, W11 · Hippodrome Place, W11 · Hofland Road, W14 · Holland Road, W11 · Hopgood Street, W12 · Humber Drive, W10 · Hunt Close, W11 · Hurstway Walk, W11 · Irving Road, W14 · Ivebury Court, W10 · Kelfield Gardens, W10 · Kelfield Mews, W10 · Kenley Walk, W11 · Kensal House, W10 · Kingsbridge Road, W10 · Kingsdale Gardens, W11 · Kingsdown Close, W10 · Ladbroke Crescent, W11 · Lakeside Road, W14 · Latimer Mews, W10 · Latimer Place, W10 · Lockton Street, W10 · Lorne Gardens, W11 · Lower Addison Gardens, W14 · Macfarlane Road, W12 · Malton Road, W10 · Manchester Road, W10 · Martin Street, W10 · Mary Place, W11 · Matthew Close, W10 · Maxilla Gardens, W10 · Maxilla Gardens, W10 · Maxilla Walk, W10 · Melrose Gardens, W6 · Methwold Road, W10 · Millers Way, W6 · Millwood Street, W10 · Milson Road, W14 · Minford Gardens, W14 · Mortimer Square, W11 · Nascot Street, W12 · Netherwood Place, W14 · Netherwood Road, W14 · Nicholas Road, W11 · Norburn Street, W10 · Norland Road, W11 · North Pole Road, W10 · Nursery Lane, W10 · Oakworth Road, W10 · Olaf Street, W11 · Oxford Gardens, W10 · Pamber Street, W10 · Pangbourne Avenue, W10 · Pennard Road, W12 · Poplar Grove, W6 · Porlock Street, W10 · Portland Gate, SW7 · Queensdale Crecent, W11 · Queensdale Crescent, W11 · Queensdale Place, W11 · Queensdale Road, W11 · Rackham Street, W10 · Railway Arches, W10 · Raymede Street, W10 · Relay Road, W12 · Richmond Way, W12 · Richmond Way, W14 · Rifle Place, W11 · Rillington Place, W11 · Rockley Court, W14 · Rockley Road, W14 · Rootes Drive, W10 · Royal Crescent Mews, W11 · Royal Crescent, W11 · Runcorn Place, W11 · Ruston Mews, W11 · Saint Anns Villas, W11 · Saint Charles Square, W10 · Saint Helens Gardens, W10 · Saint Mark’s Road, W10 · Saint Marks Road, W10 · Saint Marks Road, W11 · Saint Quintin Avenue, W10 · Saint Quintin Gardens, W10 · Salters Road, W10 · Samuels Close, W6 · Scampston Mews, W10 · Shalfleet Drive, W10 · Shepherd’s Bush Green, W12 · Shepherds Bush Road, W12 · Shepherd’s Bush Place, W12 · Shinfield Street, W12 · Shrewsbury Court, EC1Y · Shrewsbury Street, W10 · Silchester Mews, W10 · Silchester Road, W10 · Silchester Street, W10 · Silchester Terrace, W10 · Silver Road, W12 · Sinclair Gardens, W14 · Sinclair Road, W14 · Sirdar Road, W11 · Snarsgate Street, W10 · St Andrews Square, W11 · St Anns Villas, W11 · St Charles Square, W10 · St Helens Gardens, W10 · St James Gardens, W11 · St James’s Gardens, W11 · St James’s Gardens, W11 · St Johns Terrace, W10 · St Marks Close, SE10 · St Marks Road, W10 · St Marks Road, W11 · St Mark’s Close, W11 · St Mark’s Road, W10 · St Quintin Avenue, W10 · St Quintin Gardens, W10 · St. Anns Road, W11 · St. Mark’s Road, W10 · St. Mark’s Road, W10 · St. Mark’s Road, W11 · Stable Way, W10 · Station Walk, SE6 · Station Walk, W10 · Station Walk, W11 · Sterne Street, W12 · Stoneleigh Place, W11 · Stoneleigh Street, W11 · Sulgrave Road, W6 · Sunbeam Crescent, W10 · Sutton Way, W10 · Swanscombe House, W11 · Swanscombe Road, W11 · Tadmor Street, W12 · The Grampians, W6 · The Network, W12 · The Trail, W12 · Treadgold Street, W11 · Treverton Street, W10 · Trinity Mews, W10 · Upper Addison Gardens, W14 · Verity Close, W11 · Wallingford Avenue, W10 · Walmer Road, W10 · Waynflete Square, W10 · Waynflete Square, W10 · Webb Close, W10 · Wells Road, W12 · Wells Road, W6 · Wesley Square, W11 · West Cross Route, W11 · West Row, W10 · Western Dwellings · Westfield Way, W12 · Westview Close, W10 · Westwick Gardens, W14 · Whitchurch Road, W11 · White City Close, W12 · White City Road, W12 · Wilsham Street, W11 · Wood Lane, W12 · Woodger Road, W12 · Woodstock Grove, W12 ·
Print-friendly version of this page

Links

White City
Facebook Page
Wood Lane
Facebook Page
Shepherd's Bush Market
Facebook Page
Latimer Road
Facebook Page
Ladbroke Grove
Facebook Page
Goldhawk Road
Facebook Page
Shepherd’s Bush
Facebook Page
The Notting Hill & North Kensington Photo Archive
Facebook group
Born in W10
Facebook group
Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.

Maps


Inner West London (1932) FREE DOWNLOAD
1930s map covering East Acton, Holland Park, Kensington, Notting Hill, Olympia, Shepherds Bush and Westbourne Park,
George Philip & Son, Ltd./London Geographical Society, 1932

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

John Rocque Map of Ealing and Acton (1762)
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers an area from Greenford in the northwest to Hammersmith in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
1 



COPYRIGHT TERMS:
Unless a source is explicitedly stated, text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Articles may be a remixes of various Wikipedia articles plus work by the website authors - original Wikipedia source can generally be accessed under the same name as the main title. This does not affect its Creative Commons attribution.

Maps upon this website are in the public domain because they are mechanical scans of public domain originals, or - from the available evidence - are so similar to such a scan or photocopy that no copyright protection can be expected to arise. The originals themselves are in public domain for the following reason:
Public domain Maps used are in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighbouring rights.

This tag is designed for use where there may be a need to assert that any enhancements (eg brightness, contrast, colour-matching, sharpening) are in themselves insufficiently creative to generate a new copyright. It can be used where it is unknown whether any enhancements have been made, as well as when the enhancements are clear but insufficient. For usage, see Commons:When to use the PD-scan tag.