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Bridge · Uxbridge · W2 ·
JANUARY
5
2017

Bayard’s Bridge took the Uxbridge Road over the River Westbourne.


The origin of the river name Westbourne is not clear and does not appear before the 19th century. The areas named Westbourne such as Westbourne Grove were called that as they lay west of the bourne or river.

The river itself was named Bayswater Brook and named the Westbourne later on.

The name Bayswater is said to have derived from ’Bayard’s Watering Place’, first recorded in 1380, where the River Westbourne passed under the Uxbridge road (now Bayswater Road) , a ‘bayard’ being a horse which would have taken water from the river.

Another explanation is that the land now called Bayswater belonged to the Abbey of Westminster when the Domesday Book was compiled; the most considerable tenant under the abbot was Bainiardus, may therefore be concluded that this ground known for its springs of excellent water, once supplied water to Baynard, his household, or his cattle; that the memory of his name was preserved in the neighbourhood for six centuries; and that his watering-place now takes the abbreviated name Bayswater.


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Ann Fraser
Ann Fraser   
Added: 19 Apr 2018 13:26 GMT   
IP: 88.98.205.32
2:1:37051
Post by Ann Fraser: Broughton Street, SW8

I have been doing some family research and have found 4 plus addresses family lived in from 1901 onwards, 43 Broughton Street 1901 census, Edward P Pritchard, Wife Harriet and children Helen, Frederick, Alice & Albert. Also in 1920 Edward & Harriet Pritchard also registered Alfred & Alice Mantell. 60 Broughton St 1920 Helen Harriet and Alfred De La Porte (Helen Pritchard). Also Alice Pritchard shown born 1888 in Montifore Street and later at No. 40 Broughton Street. Plus 1A Emu Road Emily & Frederick Pritchard and daughter Peggy (Margaret Helen Pritchard). Emily was there until 1977 when she died. The area was known as Park Town. I used to live in North Street, SW4 in the 1980s, now over in Wandsworth.


Ian Gammons
Ian Gammons   
Added: 3 Apr 2018 08:08 GMT   
IP: 81.131.100.203
2:2:37051
Post by Ian Gammons: Pamber Street, W10

Born in Pamber Street but moved to Harlow, Essex in 1958 when I was three years old. The air wasn?t clean in London and we had to move to cleaner air in Harlow - a new town with very clean air!


Vallie Webster
Vallie Webster   
Added: 16 Mar 2018 03:39 GMT   
IP: 142.114.172.35
2:3:37051
Post by Vallie Webster: Tunis Road, W12

I visited my grandmother who lived on Tunis Road from Canada in approximately 1967-68. I remember the Rag and Bone man who came down the road with a horse and milk delivered to the door with cream on the top. I also remember having to use an outhouse in the back of the row house. No indoor plumbing. We had to have a bath in a big metal tub (like a horse trough) in the middle of the kitchen filled with boiled water on the stove. Very different from Canada. My moms madin name was Hardcastle. Interesting to see the maps. Google maps also brings the world closer.


Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:57 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:4:37051
Post by Jan: The Fairway, N14

We lived here from 1991 until 2008. Southgate and Oakwood stations within walking distance - Oakwood the nearest. A lovely, green and spacious area with Trent Country Park a few minutes walk (opposite Oakwood Station). Good transport links to London/Enfield/Hertfordshire. Unfortunately the opening of Asda Supermarket led to a decline of the area with many of the shops closing. When we left in 2008, many of the shops were open and it was a thriving high street. Iconic Art Deco Southgate station is a sight to see. Even Oakwood station has some Art Deco features - the old newsagent kiosk. Southagate is full of history too.

There was a large dairy when we moved there, but overtime this closed and was replaced with houses (where isn?t?). Enfield Town and Gentleman?s Row are worth a visit. First cash machine at the Barclays Bank in Enfield Town

Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:39 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:5:37051
Post by Jan: Kerbela Street, E2

My grandparents lived in Kerbela Street many years ago when they were terraced houses. My memory of the street is one long street with these strange wrought iron things outside - which I now know as boot scrapers. The house inside was fairly large, but I was a child. Loo was outside. Shame they knocked the terraces down and build a huge housing estate, but that?s progress I suppose. Does anyone know the origin of the name Kerbela?

West End Lady
West End Lady   
Added: 7 Mar 2018 21:30 GMT   
IP: 82.11.189.108
2:6:37051
Post by West End Lady: Rossmore Road, NW1

Rossmore Road is not in Camden Town, it is in St Marylebone - I should know. I was born and raised there! If anyone wants a further information please post on here.

Alicemary
Alicemary   
Added: 4 Mar 2018 21:27 GMT   
IP: 86.5.192.251
2:7:37051
Post by Alicemary: Erskine Road, NW3

I am trying to find any information out about 3 Erskine Road. NW3. I have just come across an old identity card which was my Grandmothers, dated 1946 , this being where she then lived. If anyone can give me any information about this area then, or old photographs, that would be really good.

Christobel Warren-Jones
Christobel Warren-Jones   
Added: 26 Feb 2018 13:50 GMT   
IP: 143.159.49.39
2:8:37051
Post by Christobel Warren-Jones: Hurley Road, SE11

Hurley Road was off Kennington Lane, just west of Renfrew Raod, not where indicated on this map. My Dad was born at number 4 in 1912. It no longer exists but the name is remembered in Hurley House, Hurley Clinic and Hurley Pre-School

Glenn Clark
Glenn Clark   
Added: 12 Feb 2018 22:08 GMT   
IP: 86.136.40.237
2:9:37051
Post by Glenn Clark: Burghley Road, N8

Lived with my parents at number 18 from 1963 to 1981, briefly moved back for a while but moved on in 1987. Remember riding my scooter in the 60?s and in my soap box that my grandad made, he lived at number 27 from after WW1 till 1976. Great days playing football against the wall on the corner of Burghley Rd and Lyttleton Rd with my mates from the adjoining road. Now live in North Norfolk but often think back to Hornsey and Stationers Company School.

Lynne Hqapgood
Lynne Hqapgood   
Added: 12 Feb 2018 11:05 GMT   
IP: 213.122.132.80
2:10:37051
Post by Lynne Hqapgood: Hutton Grove, N12

I have a question rather than a comment. When was 80 Hutton Grove built? My parents, Eddie and Margaret Hapgood, lived at 80 Hutton Grove from 1934 until sometime during the war,and I would love to know if they moved into a new-build house during the big suburban expansion in the 1930s. Does anyone out there know?! I visited very recently to see the road and the frontage of the house for the first time.

Gerry m lee
Gerry m lee   
Added: 10 Feb 2018 17:39 GMT   
IP: 50.64.178.175
2:11:37051
Post by Gerry m lee: Stormont Road, SW4

I lived iin 6 Stormont Road Lavender Hill Battersea from 1939 to 1964. My mother was a widow. I have one brother. The rent in 1939 would have been ten shillings a week. If ant one reads this, I now live in Vancouver Canada and my e-mail address is gerry-lee@shaw.ca and I went on line to try and find out what 6 Stormont sold for when it was built. The houses Nos. 6 4 8 12 etc to the corner where Marney Road starts were in my opinion protected during the war years, by a very large spiral church next door but one to number 4 and I am no religious. I went to school from five years old to Wix?s Lane. If this is read, please send a reply, and thank you.


KC Alexander
KC Alexander   
Added: 23 Jan 2018 15:07 GMT   
IP: 90.195.148.140
2:12:37051
Post by KC Alexander: Priory Grove, SW8

Lived in a two up two down until the age of 13.
Played on the bombsites (no health and safety then)
A Coal man Mr Bells lived in the road and kept his horse in a stable across the road from where he lived.
Fibre glass factory which made large figures etc for fairgrounds was down a mews which no longer exists.
Prefabs on the bend where Doreen, a friend of my mums lived with her two daughters.
Alan and Alex who?s mum and dad were also friends of my parents lived near the priory pub. the pub is now residential flats.
Alex was another boy who lived just a couple of doors along from me as was Colin.
The house was knocked down in 1964 and the site is now an adventure playground.
The only thing left I recognise is my old sycamore tree which grew in my garden which I could often be found climbing.

Never fell out of it !

Norman Norrington
Norman Norrington   
Added: 19 Jan 2018 14:49 GMT   
IP: 90.194.159.199
2:13:37051
Post by Norman Norrington: Blechynden Street, W10

In the photo of Blechynden St on the right hand side the young man in the doorway could be me. That is the doorway of 40 Blechynden St.

I lived there with My Mum Eileen and Dad Bert and Brothers Ron & Peter. I was Born in Du Cane Rd Hosp. Now Hammersmith Hosp.

Left there with my Wife Margaret and Daughter Helen and moved to Stevenage. Mum and Dad are sadly gone.

I now live on my own in Bedfordshire, Ron in Willesden and Pete in Hayling Island.

Have many happy memories of the area and go back 3/4 times a year now 75 but it pulls back me still.

Allen Waters
Allen Waters   
Added: 18 Jan 2018 23:19 GMT   
IP: 151.224.33.53
2:14:37051
Post by Allen Waters: Lansdowne Gardens, SW8

I used to live at no. 27 from 1950-1961. My family had the large room on the ground floor a bedroom on the 2nd floor and a room in the attic. There were several other families who came and went over the years, as well as landlords. We had a landlord for a time called ?Gethin?. I used to play with my friends in the road as there were few cars then. We used to use the lamppost next to house as a cricket wicket and it?s still there. I can remember swings in the green and a parkeeper there with a coal brazier in the winter. I was a choirboy at St Barnaby?s, I remember a bagwash near the church when the houses were demolished to build the estate. There used to be a row of shops and I particularly remember one called ?gallies? a sweet shop where you could get a penny drink and they put gas in it for you. Schools I went to were Priory Grove, then Al

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Paul Shepherd
Paul Shepherd   
Added: 16 Jan 2018 15:21 GMT   
IP: 90.255.234.91
2:15:37051
Post by Paul Shepherd: Chamberlayne Road, NW10

i lived in Rainham Rd in the 1960?s. my best friends were John McCollough and Rosalind Beevor. it was a good time to be there but local schools were not good and i got out before it went to a real slum. i gather it?s ok now.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 7 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:16:37051
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=3318

VIEW THE UXBRIDGE AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE UXBRIDGE AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE UXBRIDGE AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE UXBRIDGE AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE UXBRIDGE AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Uxbridge

Uxbridge, a Middlesex market town, lies at the end of the Metropolitan and Piccadilly lines.


The name is derived from "Wuxen Bridge" which was likely to have been near the bottom of Oxford Road where the "Swan and Bottle" now stands. The Wuxen were a seventh-century Saxon tribe.

The town centre today comprises large retail outlets and major office buildings, including the main European offices of several international companies. Uxbridge is also the home of Brunel University and the civic centre of the London Borough of Hillingdon. The civic centre is an award-winning building designed at the peak of the 1980s trend towards a new, postmodernist architectural style. Adjoining the town is RAF Uxbridge, where many Royal Air Force personnel are based. It was from here that much of the Battle of Britain was controlled by 11 Group.

Archaeologists found Bronze age remains (before 700 BC) and medieval remains when the new shopping mall The Chimes was being built. Two miles away at Denham Upper Paleolithic remains have been found.

Uxbridge is not mentioned in the Domesday Book of the 11th century, but a hundred years later the existing church, St Margaret’s, was built. The existing pub, "The Queens Head", has a sign depicting Anne Boleyn, wife of Henry VIII. The pub was previously called "The Axe" and possibly dates from the 1540’s. A tunnel connects the pub to the church. At the bottom of Windsor Street there is a cemetery with an archway. It was here on Lynch Green that three heretics were burned to death in 1555. Foxe’s Book of Martyrs gives the names as John Denley, Robert Smith and Patrick Packingham, but other sources call the last one Patrick Rockingham. He was found guilty of denying the trinity.

Under Elizabeth I, Roman Catholics were subject to severe constraints. Edmund Campion was a Catholic priest, trained in Douai, to give covert support to Catholics. He travelled around England on horseback, giving sermons in secret and pretending to be a diamond merchant. In 1580 he came to Uxbridge and hid for a couple of weeks, in a house owned by William Catesby. In 1581 Campion was caught. He was hanged, drawn and quartered in London. The 40 or so Catholics who died in this period are called the "Douai martyrs" which is also the name of the local Catholic secondary school, in Ickenham.

In 1605 the Gunpowder Plot was uncovered. The flamboyant six-foot leader, Robert Catesby (son of William), escaped and hid in his house in Uxbridge. He was later shot. There were negotiations between Charles I and the Parliamentary side in Uxbridge, January 30 to February 22 1645, commemorated in the name of a local pub and restaurant, the Crown and Treaty. This latter is on the A4020 Oxford Road where it leaves the town, at the canal overbridge.

The covered market was built in 1788, but the previous building was about twice as big, creating big problems for traffic.

The former Grand Junction Canal now Grand Union Canal, which connects London with Birmingham, passes immediately to the west of Uxbridge, and forms the borough boundary. The first stretch was built in the late eighteenth century from Brentford to Uxbridge. Further upsteam is Uxbridge Lock, and nearby is a flour mill belonging to Allied Mills. This was bought in the nineteenth century by a Mister King, who called it "Kingsmill". This brand name is still one of the best-selling bread-makers in the UK.

In the early 19th century, Uxbridge had an unsavoury reputation. The jurist William Arabin said of it residents "They will steal the very teeth out of your mouth as you walk through the streets. I know it from experience."

In the 1930s George Orwell was a teacher at Frays College, now Frays Adult Education Centre. His novel A Clergyman’s Daughter was based on his experiences there.

For about 200 years most of London’s flour was produced in the Uxbridge area. There were also breweries, but the last one was closed down in the 1930s. Near here Ellen Terry the Shakespearean actress spent her final years, as a pub landlady.

There were once three railway stations - Uxbridge Vine Street (originally just Uxbridge Station), Uxbridge High Street, and Uxbridge Belmont Road. All three have now closed. The line formerly to Belmont Road now terminates at the present station, Uxbridge, fronting the pedestrianised High Street, and is served by the Metropolitan and Piccadilly lines from Rayners Lane.
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