River Westbourne outflow

River in/near Chelsea, existing until the 1850s

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River · Chelsea · SW3 ·
JANUARY
12
2017

The River Westbourne flowed into the Thames at this point.


A vestige of the river, a wide quay opens into the river Thames about 300 yards (270 m) west of Chelsea Bridge. An overflow outfall, from a pipe named the Ranelagh Sewer, can still be seen at low tide, as most of the Westbourne’s course has been used as a convenient depression in the land to place the local sewerage system, some of which takes surface water to form a combined sewer which links to two intercept sewers, the Middle Level Sewer and the Northern Low Level Sewer in the London sewerage system.


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Ann Fraser
Ann Fraser   
Added: 19 Apr 2018 13:26 GMT   
IP: 88.98.205.32
2:1:37067
Post by Ann Fraser: Broughton Street, SW8

I have been doing some family research and have found 4 plus addresses family lived in from 1901 onwards, 43 Broughton Street 1901 census, Edward P Pritchard, Wife Harriet and children Helen, Frederick, Alice & Albert. Also in 1920 Edward & Harriet Pritchard also registered Alfred & Alice Mantell. 60 Broughton St 1920 Helen Harriet and Alfred De La Porte (Helen Pritchard). Also Alice Pritchard shown born 1888 in Montifore Street and later at No. 40 Broughton Street. Plus 1A Emu Road Emily & Frederick Pritchard and daughter Peggy (Margaret Helen Pritchard). Emily was there until 1977 when she died. The area was known as Park Town. I used to live in North Street, SW4 in the 1980s, now over in Wandsworth.


LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 8 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The bridge over the Westbourne at Sloane Square was called Blandel Bridge and was later renamed Grosvenor Bridge.
The bridge over the Westbourne at Sloane Square was called Blandel Bridge and was later renamed Grosvenor Bridge.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=37052

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 2 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The Apollo Victoria Theatre is a West End theatre, across from London Victoria Station.
The Apollo Victoria Theatre is a West End theatre, across from London Victoria Station.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=2558

VIEW THE CHELSEA AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHELSEA AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHELSEA AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHELSEA AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHELSEA AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.
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