Northwick Park Hospital

Hospital in/near Sudbury Hill, existing between the 1970s and now

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Hospital · Sudbury Hill · HA1 ·
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Northwick Park Hospital (NPH) is a hospital located on the border of the London boroughs of Brent and Harrow.


Designed by the British architect John Weeks (1921–2005), the hospital was commissioned by the NW Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board in the late 1960s, and was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1970. The design of the hospital was largely inspired by British obsolescence studies, in which a loose-jointed medical complex was created with flexibility to withstand obsolescence’s unpredictable effects.

With a fixed internal street system, the architects referred to the hospital as "an indeterminate architecture" with "no final plan" – free to grow and change over time.

In March 1975, the world’s first body CT Scanner was installed at Northwick Park Hospital.

In 1994, the internationally renowned St Mark’s Hospital, previously located in central London, moved into a wing of the hospital formerly occupied by the Medical Research Council. The hospital retains its research pedigree through its association with Imperial College School of Medicine and its own Northwick Park Institute of Medical Research.

It featured in the opening credits of the episode "The Germans" of the comedy TV series Fawlty Towers and the 1976 horror film The Omen, and has been used as a set for both series of the Channel 4 comedy Green Wing and the seventh series of ITV’s Prime Suspect.

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Scott Hatton
Scott Hatton   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 20:11 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:1:3712
Post by Scott Hatton: 12 Wansford Park, WD6

We moved to 12 Wansford Park during August 1960, moving out during 1967.

My parents had managed to wangle themselves into a house in London W10 which was due to be demolished by the local council. Thus the council moved them into a much better place (inside toilet!) opposite Tempsford Green in Borehamwood.

John Dye
John Dye   
Added: 1 Dec 2017 14:50 GMT   
IP: 86.131.134.236
2:2:3712
Post by John Dye: Cool Oak Lane, NW9

I lived at Queensbury Road, Kingsbury during World War II and used to play regularly along the edge of the Welsh Harp. About halfway along Cool Oak Lane on the south side was a pond we used to call Froggy Pond. It was the only place I ever saw a water scorpion, Nepa cinerea.
At the end of the war, all the street air raid shelters were knocked down and the rubble was piled up on the ground south of the Cool Oak Lane bridge, on the Hendon side. I remember that this heap of rubble became infested with rats and I used to watch them from the bridge. I was told that an old house on the south side of Cool Oak Lane (Woodfield House?) was once owned by the wife of Horatio Nelson. I think it later became the nurseries for plants grown for the Hendon parks.

Lesley carlton
Lesley carlton   
Added: 26 Nov 2017 22:52 GMT   
IP: 81.96.23.80
2:3:3712
Post by Lesley carlton: Embry Drive, HA7

I use to live in embry drive when it was an RAF station with my family and I went to Belmont school.cm

John Morton
John Morton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 14:36 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:4:3712
Post by John Morton: Manor Way, WD6

I remember the following shops along Manor Way: Martins, Bishop’s, the Co Op and Dewhurst.

Ron
Ron   
Added: 24 Sep 2017 22:22 GMT   
IP: 92.6.6.10
2:5:3712
Post by Ron: Colindale

The leather business and ’Leatherville’ was set up by Arthur Garstin, not GARSTON.
:o)

Irene Smith
Irene Smith   
Added: 30 Jun 2017 15:46 GMT   
IP: 217.63.200.50
2:6:3712
Post by Irene Smith: Keystone Passage, WD6

My mother worked at Keystones in the 1940 before she was married.

She later worked at home which a lot of people did. You would often see people walking around Boreham Wood with boxes filled with piecework for the factory.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 13 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:7:3712
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Conway Crescent was a 1930 estate of privately-built homes.
Conway Crescent was a 1930 estate of privately-built homes.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=15542

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 6 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:8:3712
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Deacons Hill Road is a road connecting Barnet Lane and Allum Lane.
Deacons Hill Road is a road connecting Barnet Lane and Allum Lane.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=35328

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 2 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:9:3712
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Woodcock Hill Lane until the 1920s, the road leads south from the crossroads of Kenton Lane and Kenton Road.
Woodcock Hill Lane until the 1920s, the road leads south from the crossroads of Kenton Lane and Kenton Road.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=33482

VIEW THE SUDBURY HILL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SUDBURY HILL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SUDBURY HILL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SUDBURY HILL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SUDBURY HILL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Sudbury Hill

Sudbury Hill is part of the London Borough of Harrow.

Sudbury Hill station was opened on 28 June 1903 by the District Railway on its new extension to South Harrow from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey.

This new extension was, together with the existing tracks back to Acton Town, the first section of the Underground's surface lines to be electrified and operate electric instead of steam trains.

The deep-level tube lines open at that time (City & South London Railway, Waterloo & City Railway and Central London Railway) had been electrically powered from the start.

The original station building was demolished in 1930 and 1931 and replaced by a new station in preparation for the handover of the branch from the District line to the Piccadilly line. The new station was designed by Charles Holden in a modern European style using brick, reinforced concrete and glass. Like the stations at Sudbury Town and Alperton to the south as well as others that Holden designed elsewhere for the east and west Piccadilly line extensions such as Acton Town and Oakwood, Sudbury Hill station features a tall block-like ticket hall rising above a low horizontal structure that contains station facilities and shops. The brick walls of the ticket hall are punctuated with panels of clerestory windows and the structure is capped with a flat concrete slab roof.

On 4 July 1932 the Piccadilly line was extended to run west of its original terminus at Hammersmith sharing the route with the District line to Ealing Common. From Ealing Common to South Harrow, the District line was replaced by the Piccadilly line.

Since 1994 it has been a Grade II Listed Building.
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